Dr. Laura: PSA Rising? Read This.

Recent research and clinical evidence shows we can slow the doubling time of PSA and reduce the risks of prostate cancer.

What’s so Important About PSA?

The role of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) in the prostate gland is not clear. In addition to a digital rectal exam, the level of PSA is used to screen and monitor risk of prostate cancer.

Overall the PSA specific activity within the prostate gland is relatively low. However, when the amount of this enzyme starts to rise, the activity is significant.

PSA can break apart the Galactin 3 molecule. So, the more the PSA, the more Gal -3 cleaved, the more tumour activity of Gal-3 that occurs.

Experimental data available today demonstrate an association between galectin-3 (Gal-3) levels and numerous pathological conditions such as heart failure, infection with microorganisms, diabetes, and tumour progression- including that of prostate cancer.

  • The cancer-free control patients have lower levels of galectin-3 in the serum.
  • Serum galectin-3 concentrations were uniformly higher in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

A large and fast-growing body of clinical research shows that controlling Gal-3 is an essential strategy for long-term health. Gal-3 is an active biomarker that impacts organ function, normal cell replication, immunity, joint mobility and more.

According to the research, Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) is the only available solution that can successfully block the effects of elevated Gal-3 throughout the body. By providing a safe and effective Gal-3 blockade, MCP is shown to safeguard and support the health of numerous organs and systems. This is the reason independent researchers and health professionals are increasingly interested in this nutritional supplement.

MCP appears to pretend it is Galactin -3 for the Galectin-3 receptor sites, keeping the real Galactin -3 from activating the receptor. In effect it keeps the tumour cells from building up and growing. This is reflected in the slow rate of rise of the PSA marker, and a reduced risk of tumour development.

References available upon request.

From the research of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND