Simple Tips From Dr. Phil During Uncertain Times

If you’re like myself and my family, we are living moment to moment during this COVID-19 pandemic.    It’s important that we stay well physically, psychologically and emotionally as we adhere to the social distancing.

Here are some simple strategies:

TALK TO YOUR LOVED ONES:    The research illustrates that positive relationships are associated with much better outcomes.

UNPLUG:   All of this constant news and media coverage around the COVID-19 pandemic can create anxiety and fear.  Do your best to limit the time you watch the news on TV, social media and radio.

PRIORITIZE SLEEP:  Try and set up your routine each night that can help get your mind in gear for a restful night.

SWEAT IT OUT:  If have not already, try an at home workout such as resistance training with your body weight, cardiovascular exercise, and/or calming stretches.  A favorite program we use at home is the whole beachbody workout series and for jumping/bouncing, check out cellercise.com.  Walking outside is always a great way to get your exercise in too!

REMEMBER TO HAVE YOUR MINDFUL MOMENTS: It’s important to set some time aside each day to simply focus on your breathing (at least 5 minutes)  I’ve been enjoying a great Free 21 day Meditation Series from Oprah and Deepak Chopra (they’ve gone complimentary to help us all out during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis).

Feel Better – Function Better,

Dr. Phil

Dr. Laura on Potassium Levels

Potassium is a mineral that dissolves in water and carries and electrical charge. Easy to see how it can act as an electrolyte.

Nerve, muscle, and heart function all depend on the appropriate level of potassium.It is absorbed in the small intestine and excreted mostly in the urine, and some in the sweat and stool.

The kidney is the main regulator of potassium levels, so if it is healthy and you are getting regular food sources of it, there likely is no reason to be concerned about the levels of potassium in the body.

Potassium’s role in the body.

  • fluid and electrolyte balance
  • maintains nerve and muscle growth
  • balances pH (acid/base balance)
  • contributes to heart function
  • assists in the use of carbohydrates and proteins
  • interacts with blood pressure
  • supports healthy metabolism and blood sugar regulation.

 

Food sources of potassium

  • acorn squash
  • artichokes
  • bananas
  • citrus
  • dried fruits
  • dark leafy greens
  • dried beans
  • legumes
  • nuts
  • potatoes (white and sweet)
  • soy
  • tomatoes
  • cod
  • salmon

Low levels of potassium

Potassium deficiency, or hypokalemia may be noted by fatigue, weakness, muscle cramps, heart palpitations, cardiac arrhythmia’s, hypertension, and postural hypotension. Trouble is, low potassium looks very much like high potassium, however it is more likely to have low levels

Low serum potassium can be caused by inadequate dietary intake, certain drugs, dialysis, plasmapheresis, increased potassium entry into the cells, decreased potassium exit from cells, and increased losses in the urine, gastrointestinal tract, or sweat.

High levels of potassium

Hyperkalemia rarely produces physical symptoms. Excessive potassium can disturb heart and skeletal muscle function, cause nausea, fatigue, muscle aches and weakness and increased respiratory rate.

Some medications can lead to higher than normal potassium levels:  ACE (angiotensin-converting enzymes), some antibiotics, anticoagulants, ARBS (angiotensin-receptor blockers), beta-blockers, COX-2 inhibitors, cyclosporine, antifungals, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs- Advil, Motrin), and potassium sparing diuretics.

Fasting, high blood sugar, metabolic acidosis, kidney insufficiency are all contributors to high levels of potassium.

Measuring potassium

Unless there is a state of severe deficiency, it can be difficult to assess proper levels of potassium. Blood serum levels may be normal, while blood cellular levels deficient. Beyond this, levels in the muscles may not reflect either the levels of blood cell or serum.

So long as the kidneys are functioning well and no drugs (as mentioned above) interfere,  there is generally no need to worry about higher intakes of potassium, as it will be sufficiently excreted.

References:

Kresser, Chris. 2018 Adapt Level One Blood Chemistry Manual. www.kresserinstitute.com

Lavalle, James. 2013 Your Blood Never Lies. Square One Publishers Garden City Park, NY.

Gaby A. 2011 Nutritional Medicine. Fritz Perl Publishing Concord, NH.