Dr. Laura on Mould and Indoor Air Quality

Mould is very important factor in indoor air quality. If you are chronically ill and can’t seem to shake it, test the places you spend time.

Mould Related Health Issues

  • nasal stuffiness
  • throat irritation
  • coughing or wheezing
  • eye irritation
  • skin irritation

The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention  is firm about the removal of any visible mould. Health impacts vary from person to person. Mould, once inhaled, can grow in the lungs and upper respiratory tract. It also has the potential to spread through the rest of the body.

Where is Mould found?

Mould is found where there is moisture, on just about any surface and can be tracked from place to place. Be sure to check basements, bathrooms, laundry room, kitchen, roofs and around leaky pipes. A professional can be hired to investigate anything beyond a visual check. Or if you are up to it, there are some at home kits available. The Amazon DIY Mold kit (Americans spell it without the “u”) or try the Canadian option, which includes air tests at http://www.CanadaMoldTestKits.com‎ (they must sell to Americans!)

What’s the proper indoor humidity?

Too dry and your nasal passages can dry out and make you more susceptible to infection. Too humid and the dampness can be a breeding ground for mould and mildew.

Indoor humidity should be kept around 45-50%.

A humidity reader, also called a hygrometer, is available at any local hardware store. Review and compare some of the best hygrometers evaluated in 2018.

De-humidfiers are helpful in damp spaces. Their filters should be kept clean and collection bins rinsed with white vinegar every couple of weeks. Humidity in Ontario is generally higher spring through fall and drier once the indoor heating starts.

 Health issues persist?

Long term exposure to mould means you need some serious detoxification. If health related mould issues persist, a visit with Dr. Laura may help you clean up the damage and get clear of the problems.

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Dr. Laura on Cold & Flu

The immune system works over time in the Christmas season.

Sugary treats and poor sleeping habits stress the immune system.

 People share more than good spirits. The furnace keeps us warm, but dries the air and our respiratory passages out, making us more susceptible to incoming invaders.  Cold and flu viruses can live on objects around the house like door knobs, computer keyboards, remote controls and sink handles.

Best prevention is to wash your hands well and often. That means lathering up for at least a few lines of  your favourite Christmas carol. Use your wrist to push down the tap or use the paper towel to turn the knobs off. Keep your hands and fingers away from your eyes, ears, nose and mouth. These are openings of our respiratory tract very susceptible to infection.

More remedies for cold and flu.

Think you might have something coming on? Here is a table that helps you understand if you have the cold or the flu.

Symptoms Cold Flu
Fever Sometimes Usually. Higher in children
Headache Sometimes Usually
Runny Nose Usually Sometimes
Cough Hacking Severe
Sore Throat Early, Often Sometimes
Sneezing Usually Sometimes
Vomiting Never Children
Chest discomfort Mild Usually
Weakness & Fatigue Sometimes Can last up to 2-3 weeks
Muscle Aches and Pains Mild Usually severe
Extreme Exhaustion Never Early and often
Cause One of hundreds of viruses Influenza A, B, (several subtypes and strains) H1N1 (Swine), Enterovirus D68,
Contagious Day 1-3 Day 1-9
Duration 7-10 days 21-28 days
Complications Sinus congestion, Middle Ear Infection Sinusitus, Bronchitis, Ear Infection, Pneumonia
Prevention Wash hands often, avoid close contact with those affected Wash hands often, avoid close contact with those affected