Dr. Laura: Strengthen Super Powers of the Immune

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What you’ll learn

Build your immune super powers to stay strong and healthy. Once you get a cold or flu virus, most remedies only lessen the severity of symptoms. The real trick is to build an army of defense and prevent the invading virus or bacteria from taking hold. This is important year-round, but especially as the cold and flu season emerges.  In this one-hour educational seminar meet your 38 trillion partners in health and learn the most important nutrients, medicinal plants and personal habits that will increase your stamina all winter long

Register today!

Call 519.822.8900 to reserve your spot for September 25th at 5:30pm.

About

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND is a registered naturopathic doctor with a functional medicine approach.  She has advanced training in pharmaceuticals, is a certified HeartMath Practitioner and a Certified Gluten Practitioner  and holds the designation of ADAPT Trained Practitioner from Kresser Institute, the only Functional Medicine and ancestral health training company.

Dr. Laura: 5 ways to strengthen your immune system

Immune system need a boost? Support it with one or a combination of these top five natural ways. A strong immune system means less colds and flu, especially through this winter and early spring season.

As a start, be sure to wash your hands regularly with soap and water keep indoor humidity around 45-50%. Then, visit your naturopathic doctor to find what is the best combination of these five following things you need to strengthen your immune system.

1. Probiotics

2. Adaptogens

3. Medicinal Mushrooms

4. Vitamins

5. Minerals

 

Probiotics

We know that 70% of your immune system resides in the gastrointestinal tract, so it makes perfect sense to keep a healthy balance of your microflora. Research in probiotics is very active and there may be new strains available to help you balance yours.

Adaptogens

The adrenal glands are little hat like glands that sit atop the kidneys.  When you think of cold weather, think of hats and think of adrenal support. Resilience to stress can keep illness at bay but when we are constantly under stress at work, at home and toxins build up from pesticides, environmental factors, drugs, allergens – we need help. There are a number of adaptogenic herbs like holy basil, ashwagandha, ginsengs, liquorice, schisandra, codonopsis, astragalus and rhodiola that can be custom blended to support your needs.

Medicinal Mushrooms

Medicinal mushrooms can be an amazing support for the immune system. Helpful are hot water extracts of mushrooms like maitake (Grifola frondosa), reishi (Gandoderma lucidum), Cordyceps, shitake (Lentinus edodes), turkey tail (Coriolus versicolor), and sun mushroom (Agaricus blazei). It is possible to get these in different combinations and even in packets to make a “tea”.

Vitamins

Vitamin A, C, E top the list for immune support. Oranges, citrus and bell pepper provide Vitamin C.    The beta-carotene in orange and red vegetables will convert to Vitamin A in most people. Cod liver oil is a viable direct source of vitamin A.  Wheat germ oil and almonds pack a punch of vitamin E. There are formulas available that combine these vitamins with some minerals and they can often be a sure way of getting the support you need every day.

Minerals

Zinc, Selenium and Magnesium are truly critical for the immune system to function. A varied diet will often provide enough. Bone soup broths are a great, as are pumpkin seeds for the zinc, brazil nuts for the selenium and dark leafy greens for the magnesium.

 

This blog does not constitute medical advice. Natural products can interfere with existing medical conditions and prescription drugs. Be safe and get the knowledge and advice of a naturopathic doctor.

From the heart and mind of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Dr. Laura: Probiotics to Treat Depression

Research strengthens the GUT-Brain axis connection; McMaster University find benefits of probiotics in cases of depression.

Probiotics may relieve symptoms of depression, suggests a new study.
Credit: © WrightStudio / Fotolia

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170523124119.htm

Specific Strains Identified

A number of patients come to me with a history of depression. Some may or may not be medicated at the time. Probiotics are a safe addition to current regimes and there are specific strains which have been researched for helping depression. One of my clinical favourite multi-strain probiotics happens to carry these four strains, in addition to seven others. This together with other forms of supplementation like B-12 injections, fish oil in the proper format and doses can make a big difference in over all mood and productivity.

Are you a candidate?

After a full intake and physical screening, a review of your latest blood work and any imaging, Dr. Laura M. Brown ND can help you build a plan for a happier healthier you.

Book now

Dr. Laura: Micro biome linked to fatigue, insomnia and hormone regulation

Did you know? You can fix your fatigue, insomnia, and hormones by focussing on your flora. Find out how and why your gut affects your biorhythms in the next complimentary seminar with Dr. Laura M. Brown.

The GUT-Circadian Rhythm Connection

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND, is a licensed naturopathic doctor, Certified HeartMath Practitioner, Ceritified Gluten Practitioner and has a Functional Medicine approach in her practice. What she really does is help people better digest their food and the world around them.

Wednesday, July 12th 6:30-8:00pm @ Goodness Me

Register Now!

Flourish Your Flora

When the bacteria and yeasts in the gut, also sometimes referred to as microflora, micro biome or simply “flora”, are imbalanced, it can not only promote gassiness and bloating, it fails to provide the front line defence needed to prevent disease.  A healthy microflora will mean a healthy person! 70-80% of our immune system is in our gastrointestinal tract and the microbes in there play a big part in many aspects of our health.

What affects Flora in a Bad Way?

  • Antibiotic use
  • NSAIDs (non steroidal anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), Aspirin, Celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac and indomethacin)
  • Birth control pills
  • Chronic stress
  • Sleep deprivation—even a single night of significant sleep deprivation can affect intestinal permeability and other aspects of digestion and gut function.
  • Overeating – even overeating in a single meal can affect the micro biome
  • Physical inactivity or excess physical activity
  • Hypothyroidism, (T3 is required for intestinal motility, less T3 leads to constipation)
  • Hyperthyroidism  (Too much T3 leads to diarrhea and loose stools).
  • HPA axis dysfunction -changes in cortisol secretion can lead to flora changes through a number of different mechanisms.
  • Excess alcohol intake (increases intestinal permeability)
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Environmental toxins such as mold, biotoxins, and heavy metals.

Good Flora Provides

Protective, Structural and Metabolic Function.

Protection.

  • Pathogen displacement
  • Nutrient competition
  • Receptor competition
  • Antimicrobial compounds

Structure.

  • Barrier fortification
  • Induction of IgA
  • Apical tightening of tight junctions
  • Immune system development

Metabolic function.

  • Aid in absorption of energy and minerals from food
  • Production of some vitamins
  • Help reduce inflammation. 

Flourish Your Flora

Fermented foods provide naturally occurring probiotics to the human through diet and have a long history of safe use. It is important to feed the gut micro biome with the right microbes every day in order to maintain beneificial protection, structure and function.

Yogurt: Fermented milk product. Slightly tart, varying thickness and creaminess. Yogurt is abundant in calcium, zinc, B vitamins, and probiotics; it is a good source of protein; and it may be supplemented with vitamin D and additional probiotics associated with positive health outcomes. Traditional yogurt contains: Bifidobacterium lactis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii (bulgaricus), and Streptococcus thermophiles. For best nutrition, opt for yogurt with no added sugar or flavours and one that states “live and active cultures”.

Recent studies have shown that yogurt consumption is associated with a healthier diet and metabolic profile in adults. In children, frequent yogurt consumption is associated with a lower fasting insulin level, reduced insulin resistance and increased insulin sensitivity.

Kefir: Fermented milk. Taste is tangy and smooth. Much like a liquid yogurt with about three times the amount of probiotics per serving. Kefir typically contains the following beneficial bacteria: Lactococcus lactis (lactis, cremoris, diacetylactis), Leuconostoc mesenteroides (cremoris), Lactobacillus kefyr (thermophilic)and Saccaromyces unisporus.

Kefir is also a reasonable source of phosphorus and protein, vitamin B12, B1, and Vitamin K. It is an excellent source of biotin, a B Vitamin that aids the body’s assimilation of other B Vitamins, such as folic acid, pantothenic acid, and B12. Kefir can be calming with its calcium, magnesium, and tryptophan.

Also good news for people lacking lactase, the enzyme required to break down lactose (sugar in milk products). Not only does fermentation reduce lactose content in kefir from 5% to 3.6%, the beta-galactosidase in kefir additionally breakdown lactose. For this reason, Kefir is good to help re-build tolerance to lactose, especially those with Candidiasis. Generally, it is suggested to start with two shooter cups of kefir in the morning (about 4oz) on an empty stomach. Every other day increase the amount by an additional shooter cup (2 oz) until you are able to drink a full 8oz (236ml).

Kombucha: Fermented black tea. Look for ones that are raw and do not have sugar listed on the list of ingredients. Gluten free, dairy free and vegan. Craze started 2,000 years ago in the Orient. It’s tart, fizzes and is somewhat acidic: a bit of an acquired taste. Kombucha received some bad rap based on the home preparations fermented in lead-glazed ceramic containers (what were they thinking!). Any fermentation process is best done in clean glass, in conditions away from the risk of possible contaminants. Follow clean fermentation practice if brewing at home. Kombucha tea can contain up to 1.5% alcohol, vinegar (acetic acid), probiotics, B vitamins, and caffeine. If left unrefrigerated, the alcohol will continue to build. If pasteurized, the probiotic content will be killed. Probiotics are grown from a “scoby” which is made of Acetobacter xylinoides, Acetobacter ketogenum a Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Saccharomycodes apiculatus, Zygosaccharomyes species, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Schizosaccharomyces pombe: Brettanomyces, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Gluconacetobacter kombuchae, and Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis. In animal studies, kombucha has been shown to reduce blood sugar levels.

Note: Too much kombucha can be toxic to those with weakened immune systems. A moderate serving is about 4oz a day, more increase risk for metabolic acidosis.

Fermented Vegetables: Pickles, Beets, Kimchi, Sauerkraut…pretty much any vegetable can be fermented. Traditionally, the vegetable is soaked in brine (salt) that kills off harmful bacteria. In the fermentation stage, the naturally remaining Lactobacillus bacteria convert sugars into lactic acid, which preserves the vegetables and gives them their unique, tangy flavor. Think of combining prebiotics in your fermented vegetable recipes for added goodness.

More at: https://chriskresser.com/become-a-fermentation-ninja-without-leaving-your-pajamas/ 

  • Feed the flora! Just like fish in an aquarium, your need to feed your flora. You need prebiotics to feed the colonies of probotics (Lactic Acid producing Bacteria). Prebiotics are non-digestible plant-derived carbohydrates. Not only is it important to supplement with fermented foods that provide beneficial bacteria, it is important to also provide the food that stimulates probiotic growth and further fermentation in the colon. Diets complete with prebiotics and probiotics have shown to reduce reactive oxygen species and markers of inflammation. Prebiotics include fructans like inulin or fructo-oligosaccharides which in English means chicory root powder or as it is labeled, FOS (Fermenting Oxygen Species). Inulin is also naturally found in asparagus, bananas, burdock root, dandelion root, garlic, Jerusalem artichokes, leeks and onions.

From the heart and research of Dr. Laura M. Brown ND. 

Dig into Digestion

First it must be absorbed

How does the body breaks down food?

What helps the nutrients become available?

What does it mean if you experience, pain, bloat, gas, constipation or diarrhea?

digestive_system

Dig into Digestion with Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND and get the facts on optimizing your health by paying attention to the signs and symptoms provided by your gastrointestinal tract.

Free Class! Register here

Goodness Me!

Wednesday, Oct 19th.

6:30-8:00pm

 

 

picture source: archivecnx.org

 

Is Your Pooh Normal?

What does the state of your stool say about your health?

Our bodies are ultimately a manufacturing facility… food, nutrients absorbed and waste out. What our stool (medical term for pooh) tells us about the state of our bodies can be very informative. Take the Bristol Stool Chart, shown below, for example. The seven types of stool can tell us a lot about what’s going on. Lovely you say? Well, it can speak volumes to a naturopathic doctor on what to do to help you uhm.. move on… so to speak.

BristolStoolChart 

Get the SCOOP on your POOP!

If you are mostly a Type 3 or 4, way to go! You are likely getting enough water, fibre, eating a balanced diet and have a strong microflora (good bacteria in the gut). You likely have no underlying factors of disease affecting your intestinal tract.

Type 5? Likely need to pay attention to the right kinds of fibre, maybe some dietary tweaks, a proper probiotic and adequate fluid intake.

If you are Type 1 – 2 OR 6 – 7, then we need to get you more water and the right kinds of fibre and look for any neurological upset, food sensitivities, or medication side effects. Also to be considered are things like thyroid function, diabetes, calcium levels, dietary habits, supplement dosages, Celiac disease, bowel obstruction, endometriosis or even possibly cancer. Stress, depression and anxiety can also be a factor in alternating constipation and diarrhea.

As a naturopathic doctor we look to the root cause of the issue, remove anything that may get in the way of healing, and then look to what needs to be changed or added in order to restore the natural balance of the body, mind and spirit.

Dr. Laura M Brown, ND will find gentle ways to stimulate your healing within and restore your natural equilibrium.

Call now for an appointment at 519.826.7973

 

 

Food or Mood: Which comes first?

Are you an emotional eater? Or have you ever wondered if what you eat can affect how your feel? Discover top 5 digestive links between the food you eat and the way you feel.

withinus
Join Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND to learn about:
1. The Hunger Cues
2. Food Sensitivities
3. Gut Health and Mood Connection
4. Sugar & Dopamine
5. Protein & Neurotransmitters

For example: Did you know the microflora or bacteria that lines your digestive tract can communicate to your hunger centres and trigger cravings to preferentially feed themselves? Learn how to build a healthy flora that will contribute to your mood, your weight and your well being.

This and the four other areas listed above will be covered in Dr. Laura M. Brown’s next complimentary talk entitled Food or Mood at Goodness Me! in Guelph on January 13th, 6:30pm. Register here.

What foods are best for you?

Note current Christmas SPECIAL on your Individualized Koru Food Sensitivity testing

at Forward Health with Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND. No Needles.

$225 for 230 foods.

Dec – sold out

Jan 6 & 27 – call (519) 826-7973 to book

Before Guelph Walks for Memories on Sept. 19th, consider these 5 steps to improve your memory and brain health.

Before Guelph Walks for Memories on Sept. 19th, consider these 5 steps to improve your memory and brain health.

Having a senior’s moment? Forgot where you put the keys? Muddling through the better part of the morning and coffee just doesn’t seem to kick start the engine anymore? Brain fog happens to those of all ages and sometimes there is something definitive we could do to provide clarity on the situation.

5 ways that could improve your memory now.

  1. Diet & Digestion
  2. Detoxify
  3. Boost Cell Power
  4. Control Stress
  5. Exercise

 brain

  1. Diet and Digestion

Did you know good digestion is key to brain function? A diet high in vegetables (6-8 cups daily) with a few fruits (1-3 a day) will provide phytonutrients and antioxidants to reduce inflammation, add fibre to keep your bowels moving & toxins excreted. Natural source of probiotics like kefir, natural sauerkraut, Kimchi, natural yogurt, raw cheese to boost not only digestion so you can better extract the nutrients from your food, but also mood and immune boosting properties. Adequate protein (0.8- 1.0g/kg) serves as the building block for many neurotransmitters-particles that send information across your brain and throughout your body. Healthy fats (fish oil, olive oil, flax seed oil, coconut, avocado), line the nerve sheaths and cell membranes helping information pass more expediently. Nerve transmission is helped with B vitamins found in whole grains and lean meat. Maintaining steady blood glucose helps stream a steady supply of glucose to the brain, its one source of energy.

  1. Detoxify

Heavy metals, pesticides, cosmetic chemicals and environmental pollutants build up in our bodies over time. A gentle detox program with hydrotherapy, botanical medicines, natural cleansing supplements and an anti-inflammatory diet will help the body rid itself of toxic burden.

  1. Boost Cell Power

The cellular powerhouse is the mitochondria. There are more mitochondria in brain cells than any other part of the body. Mitochondria use oxygen so it is important to keep a steady supply of oxygen flowing to the brain. Red blood cells carry the oxygen from our lungs through our body and brain. Great circulation is key (see exercise) and medicinal mushrooms are superb for boosting red blood cell health. Mitochondria are well served with many nutrients, however key ones are B-vitamins, Co-Q10, Acetyl-L-Carnitine, and magnesium malate. Talk to your Naturopathic Doctor about what may be right for you.

  1. Control Stress

Ongoing stress leads to prolonged release of cortisol, which lends itself to insulin dysregulation (poor blood sugar control), chronic inflammation, memory lapses, fatigue and depression. Consider a lifestyle counseling, a soothing massage, a series of acupuncture treatments to reduce stress, or a lovely botanical adaptogen to help regulate the adrenal glands – the producer of cortisol.

  1. Exercise

Regular exercise will help regulate cortisol, improve your capacity to sweat and release toxins through your skin and lungs. It will mobilize and regulate your bowels to excrete the solid toxins.  It will also help you sleep better, a critical function to healing and rejuvenation. Moving your body improves lymphatic circulation so helps your immune function. Another key factor for exercise is the increased transport of oxygen to your brain. A great reason to get out and Walk for Memories in Guelph on September 19th.

If brain fog persists, see your doctor. In serious cases, it can signal an underlying neurological or inflammatory condition, such as Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, food sensitivity or diabetes. Above all, don’t accept brain fog as a simple factor of aging. With the right support, you can stay sharp and protect brain health — at any age.

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Please note that the above is intended for educational purposes only and does not constitute individual medical advice. Please book an appointment for your individualized medical treatment plan.