Dr. Laura: Drugs that affect the microbiome

Drugs are one of the major factors that affect the microbiome. The impacts vary depending on the drug and duration of treatment.

The environmentfoodstress and drugs  all contribute to changes in the microbiome. This is why it is important to recognize and address any contributors that cause troubles.

Clinical intake and tests flushes out root causes and provide clarity. 

Why should I care?

Unique patterns in the microbiome link to different diseases. An unhealthy microbiome links to depression, anxiety, autistic disordersvitamin and mineral status (nutrient absorption)hormone production,  eczemadiabetes, obesity, arthritis and inflammatory bowel psoriasis and other autoimmune, conditions, heart healthcholesterolnon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), diseases.  Research continues to expand this list.  

What is the microbiome?

The human microbiome exists in the gastrointestinal/urogenital tract and the skin. The trillions of cells that make up our microbiome actually out number the human cells that we have in our body by tenfold. Are we microbes having a human experience?

Healthy microbiome?

A healthy regular stool is not always indicative of a healthy microbiome. History of autoimmune conditions, food sensitivity, sugar cravings, gas, pain, bloating, bad breath, candidiasis, brain fog, mood changes, weight issues, skin issues, joint pain, trauma, stress, headaches, use of birth control or other hormones, frequent use of antibiotics and certain drugs can all be factors or indicators of microbiome disruption. 

What drugs affect the microbiome?

Your microbiome may be out of balance if you are currently, or have history of taking, any of the following drugs:

  • Antibiotics
  • Cancer Therapies
  • Antihistamines
  • Antidiabetic drugs
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs
  • GI disorder drugs
  • Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Anti-psychotic drugs
  • Anti-coagulants
  • Hormones: estrogen, birth control, thyroid hormone

Find out more…tests available

One helpful test to look at the key players of the microbiome is the comprehensive stool and parasitic analysis. Knowledge of the landscape certainly helps streamline the treatment. 

Food sensitivities often rise when the microbiome is off balance. It is important to recognize the foods that are bothersome. Then remove them for a while and do the work to remove unwanted microbes and replace with healthy ones while repairing the gastrointestinal tract lining. Protocols are patient specific based on the microbiome the lining of gastrointestinal tract and the overall health of the patient. 

Dr. Laura M. Brown ND is a Naturopathic Doctor with a functional medicine approach. She is a Certified Gluten Practitioner, a HeartMath Certified Practitioner and is a graduate of Adapt Level 1 at Kresser Institute of Functional Medicine. Essentially, Dr. Brown helps people better digest their food and the word around them. More at www.naturalaura.ca and  www.forwardhealth.ca

Dr. Laura: Dangers of Proton Pump Inhibitors

Proton Pump Inhibitors, or PPI’s may help gastrointestinal reflux (GERD) in the short term, but they increase risk of many long term negative effects.

Long Term Side Effects of PPIs

When proton pump inhibitors are taken for an extended length of time, they can ™cause a shift in the gut microbiome that –increases risks for:

  • liver disease like alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis
  • increased risk for cardiovascular events, kidney disease and dementia. 
  • Nutritional deficiencies, especially B12 and iron.


GERD

™Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is caused from a faulty lower esophageal sphincter valve. ™Backs up content of stomac acid burns™ the esophageal lining. For many, a trip to the conventional doctor mean a prescription of proton pump inibitors – a drug that often ends in an -prazole. Like omeprazole, pantoprazole, for example.

Causes of GERD

  • bacterial overgrowth
  • lazy sphincter
  • food sensitivity

Interesting fact is the real cause of GERD may be from not enough stomach acid, rather than too much. If this is the case, taking a proton pump inhibitor, which lessens stomach acid can actually make the problem worse. Tests for H. pylori, a bacteria that can sometimes overgrow in the stomach may be necessary. H. pylori likes to reduce the level of stomach acid so it can thrive. Lower stomach acid means food is not properly digested and this can lead to fullness in the stomach and regurgitation or GERD.

The gastric-esophageal sphincter may be lazy and in need of tonification. Proton pump inhibitors won’t address this issue, however botanical medicine can often help.

Another reason to skip the proton pump inhibitor and look for the root cause is that GERD is often a result of food sensitivity. Food sensitivities related to GERD can be more than the typical caffeine, peppermint, spicy foods and citrus that commonly aggravate the issue.

For help with this and more digestive concerns, book online, contact drlaurambrown@forwardhealth.ca or call 519 826 7973 to book your appointment today.


Dr. Laura: Boost your energy

The energy powerhouses of cells are called mitochondria. These tiny organelles are derived solely from our mother’s DNA and are reposible for generating the energy our bodies need to run.

Mity Mitochondria

  • Make up about 10% of our body weight
  • 200-2000 per body cell
  • relies on the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat
  • loves to run on ketones
  • Needs nutrients like calcium, B vitamins, CoQ10, N-Acetyl-Cysteine, Magnesium, Alpha lipoid acid, lysine

Energy Drains

Fatigue comes from drains on the mitochondrial function. This can happen with any type of toxic burden:

  • long term nutrient deficiency
  • poor sleep habits
  • hormonal disruption
  • eating too much in general
  • eating too much sugar
  • excessive exercise
  • heavy metals
  • viruses and spirochetes (Lymes)
  • pesticides
  • plastics, PCB’s
  • drugs
  • mold

Signs of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

Unexplained fatigue, the need for more than 8 hours of sleep on an ongoing basis, poor exercise recovery, impaired sense of smell or taste, headaches, poor motivation, depression, anxiety, brain fog, forgetfulness, extra sensitive to light and noise – are all indicators of poor mitochondrial dysfunction. While other things may be at play like poor thyroid function, hypothalamus, pituitary or adrenal function, it is important to also consider the mitochondria.

Boost Your Energy

Support the mitochondria and reclaim your energy. An initial naturopathic appointment will start the process to understand the source of your energy drain. Together a same day plan could initiate the changes required to boost energy.

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Ditch Depression: 8 factors that chew at your mood

Root Cause Medicine

This isn’t to discount the neurotransmitter deficiencies that may exist in some people. As I learned in my extended pharmaceutical training, research shows that only 50% of the people may be helped with anti-depression meds about 50% of the time. So what about the rest of people the rest of the time? And in any case, doesn’t it make sense to try to support your body’s own natural mechanisms of healing and feeling better?

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND will help you understand the scientific evidence behind the natural remedies used in defying depression in her free session at Goodness Me! on Wednesday November 16th. Register Here.

8 factors that chew at your mood

  1. sleep
  2. food sensitivity
  3. exercise
  4. nutritional deficiencies
  5. inflammation
  6. light exposure
  7. toxin build up
  8. hormonal imbalance
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