Dr. Laura’s Microwave Cake

Start your day right.  It takes only 5 minutes to whip up this dairy free, gluten free breakfast cake. It is a good source of fibre and protein and has no added sugar.

 Microwave Mug Cake

In a large mug or small dish, with a fork, combine the following :

1/2c egg whites or 2 eggs

1 small ripe mashed banana

1 tbsp olive, avocado or coconut oil

1/4c ground flax seed

1-2 Tbsp c chia seed OR Quinoa OR unsweetened Cocoa powder

1/8 tsp baking soda

Microwave for about 3min (depends on the strength of your microwave). It is done if the centre bounces back when you touch it. If it is not bouncy in the middle, put it back in for 30 more seconds and test.

For more Paleo mug cake recipes here.

From the kitchen of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

 

 

Dr. Laura: Nutrition for the New Year!

Kick the New Year off right – reset your diet, your health and invigorate your life!

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND offers Naturopathic Medicine with a Functional Medicine approach. She helps people better digest their food and the world around them. She is a Naturopathic Doctor, a Certified Gluten Practitioner, HeartMath Certified Practitioner and is engaged in a year long training module at the Kresser Institute of Functional Medicine.

Achieve Optimum Health

Why wait until disease sets in? A visit to Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND can help you identify nutritional deficiencies before disease sets in. With a physical exam and intake that looks at your hair, skin, nails, sleep, stress and diet, Dr. Laura may identify nutritional deficiencies that, if left alone may lead to a number of common problems:

  • fatigue
  • anxiety
  • dry skin
  • acne
  • depression
  • insomnia
  • weakness
  • dizziness
  • leg cramps
  • peripheral neuropathy
  • poor workout recovery
  • poor memory and concentration
  • brittle, cracked or peeling nails

Food Sensitivity Testing

Sometimes we can be sensitive to foods and not even know it. Testing helps identify what foods may be bothering your system. Using blood or electro dermal screening test will help identify foods that need to be rotated, avoided or eaten occasionally. Knowing your personal food fingerprint may help reduce or even eliminate skin conditions, depression, anxiety, headaches, stomach aches, joint pain and more.

  • Electro Dermal Screening Tests
  • Blood Tests

Nutritional Analysis

Naturopathic Medicine is a comprehensive framework for medicine that looks at the body as a whole and integrated biological web of physiological function. Dietary analysis helps see if you get the ratio of fats, carbs and protein that best suits your individual requirements.

Clinical and laboratory testing is used to evaluate optimum levels for your best health. Most conventional interpretation use metrics that diagnose disease… but why wait until then? Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND can evaluate:

  • Physical evaluation of the health of the hair, skin, nails
  • Dietary analysis helps identify meal timing and preference, macronutrient balance
  • Blood tests are available to evaluate status of nutrients like iron, B12, folic acid, magnesium, calcium, zinc, copper, Vitamin D.
  • Electrodermal screening will help identify an imbalance of a given nutrient.

Kick off the new year with an overview of your nutritional status and find your optimum health. Call 519.826.7973 to book your appointment today.

Friendly Fats

When we talked about fats in the 4380 Fitness Challenge nutrition night, one person asked me if she was eating too much fat. What she actually has found is that, for her, eating more fat actually helps with anxiety. This is a fantastic personal discovery! In the 6 daily diet tips I mention a goal of 6 tablespoons of healthy fat a day. This of course is a general guideline. I cannot tell you how much fat or carbs or protein is exactly right for you. Only you will be able to what is safe and healthy through individual professional guidance and even then, some trial and error.

Also, keep in mind your needs will change with age and season. We all need to eat for the season. When it is cold outside we need heartier, heavier meals. When it is hot and humid, we need light and refreshing sustenance to fuel us without weighing us down. Babes need higher fat as the brain is rapidly developing and different life situations demand different nutrients.

Time  for an Oil Change?

Did you know that the human brain is nearly 60 percent fat? Getting the right fats in your diet is the most crucial way to boost your brain’s integrity and ability to perform. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) are required for optimal message conduction not only in the brain, but across every cellular membrane in the body. 

More of these

If you are sensitive to a food like dairy or nuts, then you need to look at the other alternatives of healthy fats on the list.

  • Fish oil
  • Coconut oil
  • Olive Oil
  • Avocados & their oil
  • Small amounts of real butter or ghee (clarified butter)
  • Oils found in nuts in seeds
  • Fats found naturally in whole dairy
  • Fats found naturally in responsibly raised poultry & meat

Supplemental Fish oil (3rd party tested and cleansed of heavy metals):

  • Reduces cholesterol:
    • reduce triglyceride levels by 20% to 50%
  • In those with coronary artery disease: Heart attacks reduced risk by 20% and sudden death by 30% (better than statins alone)
  • Improves symptoms of depression and increase length of remission
  • Reduces symptoms of psychosis, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias
  • Reduces inflammation and severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoporosis, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, Behcet’s syndrome, and Raynaud’s syndrome
  • Helpful in weight loss
  • Reduces muscular soreness after exercise

Are saturated fats bad for you?

Yes and no. Too much of anything is not good for you. So, yes trim excess fat off your meat and avoid too much chicken skin, however, eating marbled meats and full fat dairy, coconut products and egg yolks will help  incorporate calcium into the bones, protect the liver from damage by alcohol and medications like acetaminophen, has beneficial effects on cardiovascular function, deliver fat soluble vitamins.

Less of these

  • Sunflower oil
  • Canola oil
  • Peanuts, and peanut oil
  • Safflower Oil

Not all fats are created equal.

Industry seed oils are those made from the seeds of corn, cotton, sunflower, safflower or a hybrid called canola. A small amount of these oils is not an issue, as we do need some omega 6 fats in our diet. Problem is with the North American tendency to eat fast food, restaurant food, processed and packaged foods, we tend to get way too many of these and not enough omega 3 fats. This tips the scale towards inflammation. Industry seed oils are easily oxidized and oxidized fats is a leading contributor to modern inflammatory diseases such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimers, non alcoholic fatty liver disease and fibromyalgia.

 

Never these

  • Transfats
  • Super heat vegetable oil (fried foods)
  • Rancid oils

Trans fats that are manufactured by hydrolyzing an natural fat tends to do all the wrong things to cholesterol. Trans fats raise LDL and triglycerides and lower HDL.  Not good.

Rancid oils, or fats that are past their shelf life will contribute to oxidative stress in your body. This means aging!

Anything eaten in excess can be converted and stored in the body as fat. That includes protein and carbohydrates. Did you know one of the main reasons for young people today being diagnosed with non alcoholic fatty liver is the excessive sugars in their diet?

Friendly Fat Facts

  1. Essential Fatty Acids (EFA’s) must be taken in the diet as they can not synthesized by the body. It is often necessary to supplement. Fish oil that is third party tested and cleansed of heavy metals in either a gel cap or, more economically, liquid, is best.
  2. Fats are required to help us absorb fat soluble vitamins  (A, D, E & K)
  3. Healthy fats consumed earlier in the day (breakfast) will help curb afternoon cravings.
  4.  Naturally occurring saturated fats that marble meat or as a part of dairy have benefits when consumed in moderation

This means

  1. Breakfast: could include your dose of fish oil (EFA’s) and vitamin D, a handful of nuts, or simply a tablespoon of coconut oil in your cup of coffee.
  2.  Lunch & Supper: Salad or vegetables could be complimented with either 2 TBSP of olive oil, 1/4 avocado or  some omega-3 rich fish like sardines, salmon, herring. Even lamb or chicken – light or dark meat or strips of steak will help get the most out of all your nutrients.

From the research and mind of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

 Reference:
Kresser, Chris. 2014. The Paleo Cure. Eat Right for Your Genes, Body Type, and Personal Health Needs — Prevent and Reverse Disease, Lose Weight Effortlessly, and Look and Feel Better than Ever. Little, Brown & Company. New York.
Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Fish Oil monograph accessed Dec 30, 2014. Full monograph available upon request.

 

5,000 Reasons to Eat Vegetables

I was only looking for 6 key reasons to eat vegetables.

I found five thousand. How can this be? PHYTOCHEMICALS. There are more than 5,000 phytochemicals identified plus many we suspect still remain unknown. Turns out, mother nature has packed a punch of power in the plant kingdom. Many plants contain one or more of these 5,000 nutritional perks that helps us:

  • Defend against pathogens, parasites, and predators.
  • Protect against chronic disease, including cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration, and cancer.
  • Purify and renew the blood
  • Nourish
  • Cleanse body of toxins
  • Stimulate effects
  • Relaxing effects
  • Anti-inflammatory

Food for …

As a part of the Forty-three Eighty Fitness challenge, for the next six weeks we are going to cover the elementary need for food. Function. That doesn’t mean it has to boring and mundane. It just means we are going to get back to providing our body with the building blocks it needs for life. It is about food for sports performance, energy, mental clarity, good digestion, glowing skin and good sleep. It is not all-inclusive, as they are general dietary guidelines. Each week we will dig a little deeper into the 6 daily tips. If you are not a part of the program and not a patient of mine, don’t worry, there is still lots right here in the Forward Health Journal and on the Naturalaura site.

In our society we relate to one another so much through food. It is really a part of our heritage, our culture and our social connection. This is partly what makes it so difficult to make changes. It’s not just a little corner of your life. Eating is something we do everyday. Every time we eat we make a choice. What drives that choice? Taste? Texture? Atmosphere? Experience? Promise to make you happy? If you suspect you might make choices driven by emotion, you might like to join me next Wednesday, March 15th at Goodness Me! in Guelph from 6:30-8pm for a free educational session on Food or Mood, Which Comes First? Register here.

Evolution, Not Revolution!

It won’t work if you try to make all the changes at once. As I say to my patients, it’s about evolution, not revolution. Did you learn to ski by jumping on the black diamond hills first? Not likely. You needed to build some strength, add some skills, practice them in safe small ways and build your confidence. Ditto for making changes in diet. Start somewhere. Carve out an area and make some attempt for small changes. This week we are going to start with vegetable awareness! Goal is 6 cups of vegetables a day. Many people struggle to get one. If you are the one cup a day kind of person right now, then maybe you aim to get two or three cups a day as a place to start. What’s in it for you?

Guideline Goal: 6 cups of Vegetables a Day

3 Cups of Cabbages

The cabbage also known as cruciferous or brassica family helps support phase 1 and phase 2 detoxification of the liver. This means eating more of this family of vegetables provides support for your natural detoxification process. Your liver is in charge of over 300 jobs. Not a bad thought to give your liver a hand.

Interesting to note: broccoli contains abundant B vitamins, vitamin A, has more vitamin C than citrus and is rich in chlorophyll.

  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Swiss chard
  • Collard greens
  • Kale
  • Arugula
  • Bok Choy
  • Turnip
  • Kohlrabi
  • Radish/ radish greens

3 Cups Leafy Greens

Bitter greens help stimulate digestion. Good digestion means good energy! Some cultures find this helpful before a meal, others after. Leafy greens also provide fibre, vitamin K, chlorophyll, vitamin A and C. Lettuce leafs contain the sedative lactucarium, which relaxes the nerves, helping the rest and digest nervous system do its thing.

  • Dandelion greens
  • Carrot tops
  • Romaine
  • Red leaf lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Endive
  • Radicchio
  • Watercress
  • Chicory
  • Beet greens

1 Cup – Mix of Orange and Red

Red and orange means a rich source of beta carotene / vitamin A. Carrots and beets are blood purifying and anti-inflammatory for mucus membranes. Bell peppers are additionally an excellent source of vitamin C. Sweet potato and squash have great fibre and help reduce inflammation.

  • Carrot
  • Bell pepper – red/orange
  • Squash
  • Sweet potato
  • Beet

1 Cup Other

For appetite control, celery can be eaten between and during meals. Celery root is excellent sliced thin and baked on parchment paper. Fennel root has a mild licorice flavor and is an excellent add to soups. Parsnips slow cooked with carrots marinated in a little olive oil and sea salt is delectable. Peel them and cook them whole! Cucumber is very cooling and better eaten in the hot and dry times of the year. A couple slices of cucumber and maybe a sprig of mint in water is a very refreshing. summer drink.

  • Celery
  • Celery root
  • Fennel
  • Parsnip
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumber
  • Turnip

Preparation

Ideally more cooked in the fall and winter and start introducing more raw in the spring. Cooking vegetables will destroy some of the nutrients, however softens the fibres and makes them easier to digest. Digestive fire is stronger in the hotter months, so lots of raw in summer is just fine. Fall, winter and early spring we are better to eat more slow cooked, lightly steamed vegetables. I often preserve the water I steam my veggies in and use it in stir fry to add moisture or add it to soup. Eat your cooked veg or broth within 24 hours to obtain the maximum nutrition. Don’t forget an easy way to add up the vegetable tally is to throw a stick or two of celery, and a handful of greens into your smoothie. My favourite energy-boosting green smoothie has 2 sticks of celery, a handful of leafy greens- whatever is in the fridge, a bunch of dried mint from the garden and a little ground ginger with my pea protein.

Cornerstones of daily eating.

Jessica Cosby and Brett Milton’s Forty-three Eighty Fitness six week challenge kicks off in Guelph this month. My part is to provide some education for the nutritional aspect of good health. Thanks to Carrie and Mark Godman we set up at the prestigious Granite Homes showroom this Friday and delved into the general aspects of the 6-Daily Diet Tips. 

For the next six weeks, there will be weekly posts to provide a little more information in each of the areas of:

Week 1 – Value of Vegetables
Week 2 – Power of Protein
Week 3 – Friendly Fats
Week 4 – Function of Fibre
Week 5 – Controlling your Carbs
Week 6-  Flourish Your Flora

Oh, I almost forgot! 

To find your personalized “food fingerprint I often encourage people to have their food sensitivities evaluated. Then we map this with the six daily diet tips to maximize your results. To have this test done, call 519. 826-7973 and ask about the KORU food testing.

From the heart, mind and research of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

More about naturopathic medicine here.

References:
Del Rio D, Rodriguez-Mateos A, Spencer JPE, Tognolini M, Borges G, Crozier A. Dietary (Poly)phenolics in Human Health: Structures, Bioavailability, and Evidence of Protective Effects Against Chronic Diseases. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling. 2013;18(14):1818-1892. doi:10.1089/ars.2012.4581.
Pitchford, P. 2002. Healing with whole foods. Asian traditions and modern nutrition. 3rd ed., North Atlantic Books, Berkely, California.
Temple N, Wilson T, Jacobs DR. 2006. Nutritional Health—Strategies for Disease Prevention 2nd ed, , Humana Press, Totowa, NJ.

Dr. Phil Shares The Most Popular Apple Varieties For Fall

 

Beachbody-Blog-10-apple-popular-varieties

Summer has fallen, giving way to… well, fall. But it’s not just the air that’s getting crisper. It’s apple season and, while most varieties are available year-round, now is the time when the sugary, tangy, crunchy fruit is harvested. There are over 100 apple varieties grown commercially in the North America representing a whole host of shapes, color schemes, textures and flavor profiles. With so much choice, picking can be paralyzing.

So here are 10 of the most common varieties so whether you’re picking them from the orchard or the produce aisle, you’ll know what to expect in terms of taste as well as how best to enjoy them.

 

Red Delicious
Originally known as the Hawkeye, this is the most popular, most maligned, most ironically named of all apple varieties in the US.
Flavor profile: After generations of breeding for longer shelf life and cosmetic stability—call it vanity ripeness—the flavor has largely been cultivated out of the Red Delicious. It now has thick skin, a one-note sweet flavor, and an often crumbly texture.
Where it’s grown: Just about everywhere.
Best enjoyed: Straight out of the silo. Red Delicious apples are not regarded for their use in baking.
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples Red Delicious

 

McIntosh
This is what you expect to get when you bite into a Red Delicious.
Flavor profile: With a soft skin and softer flesh, the McIntosh strikes a level balance between sweet and acidic.
Where it’s grown: Throughout the northeastern and upper Great Lakes states and eastern Canada.
Best enjoyed: Raw, in fruit salad, or sauced. McIntosh apples typically collapse when baked.
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples McIntosh

 

Golden (or Yellow) Delicious
Considered an all-purpose apple, the Golden Delicious—along with Red Delicious (no relation)—is the one most commonly found in 42-pound bags sold for five dollars at the grocery store.
Flavor profile: Mild and sweet, the flesh is juicy, but taste-wise isn’t all that different from the Red Delicious.
Where it’s grown: In most regions of the country.
Best enjoyed: Pick your poison. It works whole, chopped into salad, or baked into desserts.
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples Golden Yellow Delicious

 

Gala
This New Zealand breed has gained popularity in the last 15 years. It’s a cross between a Kidd’s Orange Red and a Golden Delicious apple (assuming you’re up on apple husbandry).
Flavor profile: With pinkish-orange striping over a gold base, its skin is thin, concealing a crisp and juicy flesh that’s fragrant and fairly sweet.
Where it’s grown: All but the southernmost points of the lower 48.
Best enjoyed: Raw, juiced, or in salads.
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples Gala

 

Granny Smith
Neon green and as squat as a five-foot bodybuilder, this is probably the most readily-recognized of all apple varieties.
Flavor profile: If you’re into tartness, this bitter old bird is your go-to. Its crisp, juicy flesh, however, does sweeten with storage.
Where it’s grown: Originally cultivated in Australia, it’s harvested stateside below the Mason-Dixon Line, and is available year-round.
Best enjoyed: Raw, in pies, or in salads where its tartness can be offset. Granny Smiths work especially well with nut butters.
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples Granny Smith

 

Fuji
The Fuji was created in Japan (where it’s still the most popular variety) and is a cross between two American varieties (Red Delicious and Ralls Genet).
Flavor profile: Dense, crisp and generally regarded the sweetest of all varieties.
Where it’s grown: It wasn’t introduced here until the 1980s, but there are now more Fuji apples produced in all but the northern- and southernmost parts of the US than in Japan.
Best enjoyed: Raw, chopped into salads, or baked into pie.
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples Fuji

 

Braeburn
Apple snobs can’t gush enough about how this variety was discovered—as opposed to bred—in New Zealand. Its probable parents are the Lady Hamilton and Granny Smith.
Flavor profile: Thin-skinned Braeburns boast textbook apple flavor and balance sweet and tart along with faint notes of nutmeg and cinnamon.
Where it’s grown: Just about anywhere on the mainland except the northernmost parts of the Midwest and New England.
Best enjoyed: Raw, but it’s also known to juice very little during baking.
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples Braeburn

 

Pink Lady
This brand name for the Cripps Pink variety applies to apples grown under specific license, dictating a rigid sugar-to-acid ratio, among other traits. Those that don’t qualify are sold as Cripps.
Flavor profile: A cross between the Golden Delicious and Lady Williams, the Pink Lady is firm and crunchy with a tart flavor that finishes sweetly.
Where it’s grown: In America, it’s primarily grown in Washington and California.
Best enjoyed: Raw, in salads, baked in pies, and sliced onto cheeseboards.
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples Cripps Pink Lady

 

Honeycrisp
The product of efforts to develop cold-weather apples, the honeycrisp is the official state fruit of Minnesota.
Flavor profile: Keeps things simple with a light overall flavor profile that’s more sweet than tart. It’s also juicy and moderately crunchy.
Where it’s grown: The northern Great Lakes and New England. They’re actually better a week or so after removal from cold storage, making the time when you buy them the time that’s best to enjoy them.
Best enjoyed: Hardy and versatile, honeycrisps are up to any task you put them up against
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples Honeycrisp

And by the way, this is one of my favorite treats during this time of year.  They’re more expensive than all of the others, however, well worth it

Empire
Introduced in—where else—New York in the 1960s, it takes a lot to bruise this cross between Red Delicious and McIntosh varieties despite its thin skin.
Flavor profile: Retaining the sweetness of the Red Delicious and the tartness of the Mac, this is a crisp, juicy everyman’s apple.
Where it’s grown: Mostly in the Northeast and upper Midwestern states.
Best enjoyed: Raw, cooked (it’s better for this than most), chopped into salads, and in lunchboxes.
Beachbody Blog Guide to Apples Empire

Thanks for sharing the content Beachbody.com

Flush Out Fatigue

Fatigue?

Chronic Fatigue?

Fibromyalgia?

 

fatigue
Feeling Run Down with Fatigue?

 

Do you know there is a spectrum of root causes of fatigue, chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia?

Are you aware of the classic deep central pain processing that affects the brain’s pattern for dealing with sensory information?

Did you know that the mood, digestive and sleep issues that can go along with fatigue may be keys to resolving your issue?

Learn how to flush out fatigue and optimize the body’s energy producing capacity in this free session at Goodness Me! in Guelph on Thursday September 22, 2016 with Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

Feeling Stuck?

If we miss or get stuck at a point in our life, there is potential for emotional buildup that may present as sickness in the body.

When a person is “stuck” at a certain level, a homeopathic remedy, acupuncture, a Chakra clearing, yoga exercises, focused breathing, or other therapeutic efforts may “lift” the person and help them better perceive and move on from their current situation.

Understanding the Stages of Life

Whether we look at Erikson’s Stages of development, Scholten’s Homeopathic Table of Elements, Maslow’s Hierarchy, the Chinese Five Elements or the Chakra system, we can see the natural progression of development we embark on through our journey of life.

Erikson_Stages
Please click for bigger image

 

Often, it is a combination of acupuncture, a Chakra clearing, yoga exercises, focused breathing, massage homeopathy or talk therapies that gets us on our way and eventually to the top of the mountain. What is most important is to enjoy some sights on the path along your journey.

Chakras

The common thread of our personal development is woven from ancient yogis, Chinese Medicine, psychologists and psychotherapists. We all need to have our basic needs of life met before we can develop an element of safety. We need to know who we are as individuals and how we belong into our society before we can further develop the area of our heart and be able to share it interdependently with others.

It is when we can be comfortable with ourselves, we can then withstand the swell of the tide of outside influences.

Keeping the mind steady and calm while the world swells around us, is the first stage of actualization.

Once we have mastered the space of a calm and equitable mind, we can then practice the ability to let all the world go and connect with and allow our spiritual self to unfold.

Balancing the “fight or flight” (sympathetic) and the “rest and digest” (parasympathetic) nervous systems helps gain access to this blissful balanced state of what Heart Math people call “coherence”. It is not only reserved for yogis, meditation artists, super-energetic or “smart” people. It is for us all to climb mountain, at our own pace, with our own challenges and with our own set of earthly and heavenly guides.

The fact is we are all able to achieve this pinnacle of self-actualization, however we are all also susceptible to fall and crumble back down to the basic needs of life. We may actually experience many rises and falls over the course of a lifetime. In each rise and fall, it is like a breath in and out, so long as we live, our breath will rise and we will too again. Hopefully, overall, we are making steady progression up the mountain.

Sometimes it takes intense focus in one area of our life, while the others lay dormant for some time. That is, we can invest heavily in school or career while putting family life or personal relationships on hold. If we excel strongly in one area of our life, without giving time for balance in others, we miss out on the cross-training type of personal development that we need in order to rise to our greatest potential. It is important to loop back and catch ourselves to keep a steady progress in all areas of our life. Sometimes we need the chance to develop one aspect of our being before we are ready and hold the wisdom to get on to the next.
Wisdom is more precious than gold, as we learn from Soloman in the Book of Proverbs and if we do not learn from our mistakes and move forward, then this is the greatest crime.

5elementshealingtherapist

In Chinese Medicine the circles of life go on a 7 year cycle for women and an 8 year cycle for men. At age 7 the vitality of the young girl is vibrant, 14 she begins to menstruate and the governing and conception vessel are primed. Age 21, a woman’s essence peaks, she has reached her physical limit of growth and the wisdom teeth come in. Age 28 the tendons and bones of a woman are strongest and the hair flourishes. Age 35 the Yang channels weaken and the woman’s complexion withers and hair begins to fall. This progresses and the hair grays at age 42. Age 49 the conception and governing vessels are empty and the uterus closes and infertility sets in. This is a time now for more creativity and personal embarkment of growth as the energy is no longer needed to tend the womb. Menopause offers a later life fire that is more than just about hot flushes!

Later Life Fire

™Time to get moving on what you have put off:
–Careers
–Fitness goals
–Relationships
–Talents
–Travel
–Personal development

For males, the Chinese Medicine 8 year cycle begins similarly with abundance of energy at age 8, mounting at age 16 when the sperm arrives and Yin and Yang are harmonized in the male making him capable of producing a child. At age 24, the male’s physical energy peaks and the wisdom teeth arrive. At age 32 his  tendons and bones are strongest and by age 40 the hair begins to fall and teeth become loose. At 48 year old man’s Yang Qi is exhausted and his face darkens as his hair turns gray. At age 56 the male’s liver energy (testosterone) is weakened and tendons stiffen and the sperm dries up. At age 64, from the ancient Chinese circles of life, the hair and teeth are gone.

We can calm the storm within and age more gracefully

Eat well
Sleep well
Control stress
Limit excessive sexual activity.
Thai Qi, Qi Gong and Yoga and HeartMath incorporate breathing exercises that help increase the vitality and essence of our aging being.

From the heart and mind of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND. Dr. Laura offers personalize lifestyle coaching and professional means to help you Move Forward in Your Health.

Picture credits: pinterest.com, healingtherapist.com

5 minute no-bake chocolate avocado mousse

This easy dessert whips up in 5 minutes. A fun, delicious and healthy treat even a kid could make (hint: Mom might like it on Mother’s day). Garnish with fresh mint leaves, dip fresh strawberries or sprinkle some coconut on top.

mousse

Here’s what you’ll need:

2 ripe avocados, peeled and pitted.

1 TBSP coconut oil

3 TBSP almond (or other) milk

4 TBSP maple syrup

1 tsp vanilla

1/2 c cocoa powder

1/8 tsp Himalayan pink salt (other salt is OK too)

ingredients for avocado mousse

How do I tell when the avocado is ripe?

Avocados are ready to eat when they are firm but impressionable. Like a peach. If hard, they are not ready.  If you place a couple of ripe bananas beside your avocados on the counter, they will ripen with in a day or two, and then you can conveniently store them in fridge until you are ready to eat them.

How do I mix this up?

Place all ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Use hand mixer first on low speed to keep the cocoa from flying everywhere, then move up the speed as things start to get smooth.

You will need to stop the mixer every once in a while and use a spatula to clear the sides and be sure all is getting mixed in.

It will take about 3-5 min of mixing.

All the lumps should be gone and the mousse should take on a thick, creamy texture that peaks. whipped mousse

Store in the fridge for up to 24 hours or eat right away.

What’s good about the ingredients:

All natural whole foods with no artificial colours or flavours.

Cocoa: equivalent of 2 squares of dark chocolate a few days a week can boost your energy and mood.

Avocado: High in healthy fats, fibre and packed with over 20 minerals and vitamins. In moderation can help lower LDL (the “bad” cholesterol).

Coconut Oil: Cholesterol neutral so better than using butter!

Maple Syrup: Tasty local and seasonal treat. 

 

From the heart and kitchen of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

 

 

 

Food Sensitivity Testing

What are the Signs of Food Sensitivities?

People with long-term complaints who have tried many treatments and dietary interventions, with limited or no success may find it beneficial to investigate their individual food intolerance.

Do you experience any of the following?

WEIGHT: difficulties losing or gaining weight.

SKIN: eczema, skin rashes, psoriasis, dermatitis.

JOINTS: pain, inflammation, difficulties moving.

BRAIN: difficulty concentrating, fatigue.

Gastro Intestinal: “IBS”, pain, bloating, gas, diarrhea, constipation, damage to the mucosal lining, perforation & “leaky gut”. This can make it difficult for nutrients and vitamins to absorb into the body and the person over time can become deficient in things like iron, zinc, and B12.

How it works

Here’s how it works. Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND will see you for a brief 15min appointment to setup your profile, and collect your medical history prior to your food sensitivity testing. If you prefer, a regular 1 hour upfront full Naturopathic intake, is highly recommended.  In a separate (or following) 45min appointment, The Electro Dermal Screening (EDS) KORU testing will be done. No needles are involved. The testing is based on physics, rather than blood chemistry. Sometime in the following week, you will meet again for about 30 min with Dr. Laura M. Brown to receive your personalized guidance and food sensitivity report. This testing is open to any age. Unfortunately we cannot test people who have pacemakers. Call the clinic at (519) 826-7973 to arrange your KORU package and appointments. You are welcome to see Dr. Laura beyond the KORU package for further guidance on diet, lifestyle, B12 injections, acupuncture, medications and supplements however you are under no obligation to do so.

If you prefer blood chemistry analysis, Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND can line you up with this as well. In this case, please setup a regular initial assessment with Dr. Laura and she will provide you with the lab requisition that best suits your needs.

Are Food Sensitivities Real?

Food sensitivities are real. Often sensitivities go undiagnosed because the reaction is gradual and will happen 24hours- 3 days of consuming the food irritant; this makes it more difficult to pinpoint which food is the trigger. The body’s immune system can respond to food like an enemy. This stimulates inflammation, pain, bowel changes, headaches, and sometimes skin reactions. Being sensitive to a food may mean the person needs to avoid it completely, or be able to have a small amount occasionally. Sometimes after months of abstinence, a food may be reintroduced without an issue.

Who is at risk?

  • Often affiliated with autoimmune disease (SLE/lupus, thyroiditis, Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), toxic exposure to heavy metals, molds & family history.
  • Aggravated by alcohol, extended periods of stress, strenuous exercise and NSAIDs (Advil, Ibuprofen)

What foods typically cause IgG reactions?

  • Dairy, Wheat, Egg, Corn, Sugar & Soy
  • Some with Rheumatoid Arthritis find the nightshade family harmful: (potatoes, tomatoes, bell peppers, eggplant)

How do I learn if I have an allergy or sensitivity?

IgG testing can be accessed through Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.  Options for food sensitivity testing include electrodermal screening or blood spot or full blood draw.

 

From the heart and mind of your local Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Laura M. Brown ND.

 

Is Your Pooh Normal?

What does the state of your stool say about your health?

Our bodies are ultimately a manufacturing facility… food, nutrients absorbed and waste out. What our stool (medical term for pooh) tells us about the state of our bodies can be very informative. Take the Bristol Stool Chart, shown below, for example. The seven types of stool can tell us a lot about what’s going on. Lovely you say? Well, it can speak volumes to a naturopathic doctor on what to do to help you uhm.. move on… so to speak.

BristolStoolChart 

Get the SCOOP on your POOP!

If you are mostly a Type 3 or 4, way to go! You are likely getting enough water, fibre, eating a balanced diet and have a strong microflora (good bacteria in the gut). You likely have no underlying factors of disease affecting your intestinal tract.

Type 5? Likely need to pay attention to the right kinds of fibre, maybe some dietary tweaks, a proper probiotic and adequate fluid intake.

If you are Type 1 – 2 OR 6 – 7, then we need to get you more water and the right kinds of fibre and look for any neurological upset, food sensitivities, or medication side effects. Also to be considered are things like thyroid function, diabetes, calcium levels, dietary habits, supplement dosages, Celiac disease, bowel obstruction, endometriosis or even possibly cancer. Stress, depression and anxiety can also be a factor in alternating constipation and diarrhea.

As a naturopathic doctor we look to the root cause of the issue, remove anything that may get in the way of healing, and then look to what needs to be changed or added in order to restore the natural balance of the body, mind and spirit.

Dr. Laura M Brown, ND will find gentle ways to stimulate your healing within and restore your natural equilibrium.

Call now for an appointment at 519.826.7973