Dr. Phil Shares: 6 Must-Dos After Every Walking Workout

6 Must-Dos After Every Walking Workout

While walking is an excellent low to moderately intense workout that’s easy on the joints, you’ll still need to recover properly to improve fitness and avoid injuries. Here, seven steps to include in your post-walk recovery routine:

1

COOL DOWN

Whether you’ve gone for a long endurance walk or thrown in some intervals, it’s important to take time to let your body cool down before you head back inside. This allows you to slowly lower your heart rate and get rid of any lactic acid that could potentially cause soreness and a heavy feeling in your legs. A 10-minute walking cool down or completing a few yoga poses are great options post-workout.

2

REHYDRATE

One of the most important but often overlooked aspects of recovery is hydration. Even during low-to-moderate intensity workouts, the body loses fluid through sweat that needs to be replaced. If you don’t, recovery takes longer and your performance for your next workout will be negatively affected. In the hour that follows your walking workout, drink plenty of water. If you’re doing long distance training for a walking marathon or have completed a particularly intense workout in hot weather, an electrolyte replacement drink might also be needed. If you’re unsure exactly how much fluid you’ve lost during exercise, weighing yourself before and after workouts is one way you can gauge how much fluid you need to drink to rehydrate properly. You can also track your hydration with an app like MyFitnessPal.

3

REPLENISH YOUR ENERGY STORES

Consuming healthy, nutrient-rich food after a walk is a must to allow your muscle tissue to repair and get stronger. Skip processed, sugary foods and load up on leafy greens, lean protein like chicken, fish or even a post-workout protein shake.

4

STRETCH

Stretching as soon as your workout is finished and while your muscles are still warm can help reduce muscle soreness and improve your flexibility — both of which can help you improve your overall fitness and decrease your chances of injury. If you don’t have a ton of time to go through a series of stretches, concentrate on your weak spots. For example, if hamstring tightness is normally an issue, put most of your attention there. When you have the time, try this seated routine that targets many of the common sore spots for walkers.

5

REDUCE MUSCLE SORENESS

While nutrition and stretching are big pieces to this puzzle, there are other things you can do to help prevent soreness so you can feel better and work out more frequently:

  • Massage: This helps improve circulation and relax aching muscles.
  • Recovery tools: If you don’t have money or time for a professional massage, try recovery tools like foam rollers, lacrosse balls or a Theragun to loosen up sore spots.
  • IceTry taking an ice bath or simply icing any sore spots like your knees, lower back or shoulders post-walk.

6

TRACK YOUR PROGRESS

Setting goals and tracking your progress is an important part of the big picture. Instead of waiting and possibly forgetting about it all together, upload your workout info to your favorite fitness app shortly after you’ve finished your walk. This allows you to see the work you’ve put in and can provide a mental boost when you realize how much you’re progressing.

by Marc Lindsay

Shared By Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Dr. Kyle: Building Stronger Bones

When discussing bone health, we often talk about proper nutrition. Adequate vitamin D and calcium intake are usually recommended to enhance bone mineral density (BMD). What is not discussed as often is the role of exercise and weight training for increasing bone strength. A holistic approach looking at what we put IN our body as well as what we DO with our body is the key for building stronger bones.

As we age our body experiences several physiological changes. Our hormone levels change, muscle mass declines, and bones become less dense. Low bone density, otherwise known as osteopenia, increases our risk of fracture. Although we can bounce back from a slip or fall in our early years, a hip fracture in older individuals can have detrimental effects on quality of life. The good news is, there are important steps you can take to prevent or slow down the decline of BMD.

Research has demonstrated that healthy individuals and patients with osteoporosis can improve BMD with high-moderate impact activities and resistance training. A few examples of high impact exercises include step classes, jogging, and jumping jacks. Resistance or weight training on the other hand can include elastic band, pully, and free-weight based exercises. To put it simply, the more force you transmit through the bone, the more the bone will remodel and grow! Clinical judgment is needed to determine the intensity of force that each patient can tolerate.

Recent studies have found that high-intensity resistance training and impact training improves BMD and physical function in postmenopausal women. Low-intensity and light-resistance exercise programs are not enough to stimulate bone remodelling and improve BMD. Heavy multi-joint compound exercises such as squats and deadlifts induce extensive muscle recruitment and transmit greater force through the bones. In particular, these exercises will apply force through the lumbar spine and femoral neck, making them stronger and more resilient to fracture. Proper form and supervision are crucial when performing any high intensity or heavy loading activities.

Talk to a primary health care provider about your BMD and if an exercise program for developing BMD is right for you. Not only will exercise strengthen your bones, but it will have profound impacts on many other systems of the body as well. As always, if you have any question do not hesitate to contact me at drkyle@forwardhealth.ca or visit my Instagram page @drkylearam!

Reference:

Sinaki M. Exercise for patients with established osteoporosis. InNon-Pharmacological Management of Osteoporosis 2017 (pp. 75-96). Springer, Cham.

Mounsey A, Jones A, Tybout C. Does a formal exercise program in postmenopausal women decrease osteoporosis and fracture risk?. Evidence-Based Practice. 2019 Apr 1;22(4):29-31.

Dr. Phil Shares:5 Science-Backed Solutions For a Healthy Lifestyle

 

5 Science-Backed Solutions For a Healthy Lifestyle

If you feel overwhelmed trying to build a healthier life for yourself, stop stressing. You can perform the simplest tasks and still create a more active, flourishing life. Plus, executing such small activities can put you on a path toward accomplishing your larger health and fitness goals.

If you struggle with any of these issues, try incorporating these easy actions into your daily life and you should begin noticing encouraging changes:

If you’re ever feeling unproductive, a power nap could help. In a study published by Sleep, researchers found a nap lasting as little as 10 minutes mitigated short-term performance impairment. “What’s surprising is how little sleep is necessary for better focus,” says Martin Rawls-Meehan, CEO of Reverie, an organization that creates sleep systems. Plus, he says a nap can reduce your body’s levels of cortisol — a stress hormone responsible “for a lot of the negative physiological effects.”

If you’re ever lacked the motivation to work out, spend a moment thinking of friends and family. In a study published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers asked 220 sedentary adults to complete one of two self-transcendence tasks: reflect on what matters most to them (such as friends and family) or make repeated positive wishes for both strangers and people they know. A control group reflected on what mattered least to them. Then, everyone viewed health messages encouraging physical activity. Results showed those who thought of others decreased their overall sedentary behavior versus those who did not think of others.

Researchers looked at data from almost 92,000 middle-aged people and found that those with disturbed sleep patterns were more likely to experience depression or bipolar disorder. Worse yet, one of the culprits of bad sleep was something completely within people’s control: scrolling the internet in the middle of the night on their cellphones, according to a study published in The Lancet Psychiatry. To negate the negative effects of disrupted sleep, Rawls-Meehan suggests using an old-fashioned alarm clock and charging your phone overnight in the kitchen — completely out of reach.

Feeling sluggish and bloated? Dr. Brian Levine, the founding partner and practice director of CCRM New York, says to avoid foods like white rice and white sugar that cause inflammation. Although you might crave these foods, swapping them for a healthier alternative just one meal per week can help you begin a healthy diet transformation — you don’t need to make sweeping food changes right away.

For example, instead of chicken and rice, try chicken with cauliflower. You can pulse the vegetable in a food processor until it resembles the consistency of rice, say Jessica Jones, RD, and Wendy Lopez, RD, of Food Heaven Made Easy. Or, swap one cup of white sugar for a half a cup of honey. According to a review published in Pharmacognosy Research, “honey can act as a natural therapeutic agent for various medicinal purposes” such as diabetes and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.

You don’t need meditation experience to begin a compassionate meditation practice. In fact, all participants in a study published in Frontiers of Human Neuroscience had no background in meditation. But in 20 minutes a day for two months, researchers found people who practiced compassionate meditation increased their social support, felt more purpose in life, decreased illness symptoms and enhanced their life satisfaction. To start such a practice, simply sit with your eyes closed, concentrate on your breathing and think of someone you love. As you get more comfortable, expand your thoughts to more people you know, then on to strangers and on to the world. Although you will still hear bad world news, you should start to achieve a healthier ability to digest negative information.

BY JENNIFER PURDIE JANUARY 5, 2019 NO COMMENTSSHARE IT:

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Dr. Kyle: Why You Should Use The Sauna

Everyone enjoys a day at the spa for some much-needed relaxation, but did you know that time spent in the sauna may actually increase muscle gains?

Originating in Finland, this traditional passive heat therapy is becoming increasing popular world-wide. Saunas are often used for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain as well as headaches. Recent evidence has suggested benefits for high-blood pressure, neurocognitive diseases and pulmonary conditions.

Emerging studies have found a protective effect for cardiovascular disease with regular sauna use for both men and women. It turns out, the more you use the sauna the better. More time spent sweating it out, the more health benefits!

Need any more reasons to hop in the sauna?

Sauna use has also been associated with increased net protein synthesis. This is why amenities such as saunas and steam rooms have become more common place in gym and fitness facilities. After your workout may be the best time to jump in the sauna and here’s why:

1. Intense short-term heat exposure stimulates the production of heat shock proteins that reduce muscle degeneration cause by oxidative stress.
2. Produce Growth hormone for increased lean muscle mass.
3. Increased NO (nitric oxide) availability to promote blood flow and circulation.
4. Decrease inflammatory pathway activity and free radical production.
5. Improve insulin sensitivity, allowing your body to utilize glucose more efficiently.
6. Enhance the production of BDNF (brain derived neurotropic factor) which synthesizes new brain cells.

Essentially, saunas stimulate the bodies autonomic nervous system in order to maintain a constant core body temperature in extreme heat. Short durations of heat stress induces adaptive mechanisms similar to exercise and have profound physiological effects.

It has also been found to help with anxiety, depression and improve parasympathetic function! Who doesn’t want a little extra mental clarity in their life.

For any questions or comments please email me at drkyle@forwardhealth.ca and be sure to follow my Instagram and Facebook page @drkylearam.

References:

Hussain, J., & Cohen, M. (2018). Clinical Effects of Regular Dry Sauna Bathing: A Systematic Review. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2018, 1857413. doi:10.1155/2018/1857413

Laukkanen, T., Kunutsor, S. K., Khan, H., Willeit, P., Zaccardi, F., & Laukkanen, J. A. (2018). Sauna bathing is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality and improves risk prediction in men and women: a prospective cohort study. BMC medicine, 16(1), 219. doi:10.1186/s12916-018-1198-0

Dr. Laura on Cold & Flu

The immune system works over time in the Christmas season.

Sugary treats and poor sleeping habits stress the immune system.

 People share more than good spirits. The furnace keeps us warm, but dries the air and our respiratory passages out, making us more susceptible to incoming invaders.  Cold and flu viruses can live on objects around the house like door knobs, computer keyboards, remote controls and sink handles.

Best prevention is to wash your hands well and often. That means lathering up for at least a few lines of  your favourite Christmas carol. Use your wrist to push down the tap or use the paper towel to turn the knobs off. Keep your hands and fingers away from your eyes, ears, nose and mouth. These are openings of our respiratory tract very susceptible to infection.

More remedies for cold and flu.

Think you might have something coming on? Here is a table that helps you understand if you have the cold or the flu.

Symptoms Cold Flu
Fever Sometimes Usually. Higher in children
Headache Sometimes Usually
Runny Nose Usually Sometimes
Cough Hacking Severe
Sore Throat Early, Often Sometimes
Sneezing Usually Sometimes
Vomiting Never Children
Chest discomfort Mild Usually
Weakness & Fatigue Sometimes Can last up to 2-3 weeks
Muscle Aches and Pains Mild Usually severe
Extreme Exhaustion Never Early and often
Cause One of hundreds of viruses Influenza A, B, (several subtypes and strains) H1N1 (Swine), Enterovirus D68,
Contagious Day 1-3 Day 1-9
Duration 7-10 days 21-28 days
Complications Sinus congestion, Middle Ear Infection Sinusitus, Bronchitis, Ear Infection, Pneumonia
Prevention Wash hands often, avoid close contact with those affected Wash hands often, avoid close contact with those affected

Muscle Cramps or Tension?

magnelevures

Do you experience muscle cramps or tension? This could be a sign of intra-cellular magnesium deficiency. Although there are many forms of magnesium on the market, not all are absorbed or do the same thing. For example, magnesium citrate is very good for loosening up the bowels. Magnesium oxalate is so tightly bound not much is readily absorbed. Magnesium bisglycinate is a pretty good form of capsule based magnesium that is useful for muscle tension.

An interesting and clinically effective product is Magnelevures, the only organically based magnesium on the market. It is procured through the Saccharomyces cerevisae strain of yeast. This is very healthy and uniquely provides the best bio-availability of magnesium on the market. Packaged in a synergistic formula with B vitamins and amino acids to additionally promote intestinal absorption, tissue utilization, and increase of intra-cellular magnesium stores.

Take one sachet of powder and add warm water and stir well.

Best if taken an hour away from other medications.

Magneluevures contains no glucose, fructose, lactose or saccharose.

Magnelevures is beneficial for maintenance of healthy bones and teeth, carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism, menstrual cramps, muscle cramps, and to promote a good night’s rest.

You may find Magnelevures in the naturopathic dispensary at Forward Health.  This information is meant for educational purposes only and does not constitute or replace individual medical advice. If you wish to find out if this product is right and safe for you, please arrange a personalized medical plan with Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

Do you need more vitamins?

What drug should you avoid taking with vitamin C? Why could your feet be tingling? Long term use of Metamucil make you deficient in a what B vitamin? Easy bruising and bleeding could be a sign of what vitamin deficiency?  What vitamin is made by bacteria?

This is Part 2 of 2 on vitamin deficiency. It covers information on vitamins B5, B6, B12, C, D,E, & K.

nutritionbig

Vitamin B5: Pantothenic acid (B5) is used in metabolic cycles is key to the body’s production of energy, cholesterol, heme and acetylcholine. Cholesterol is used as the back bone of many hormones. Heme is used to carry oxygen in your blood. Acetylcholine is controls involuntary functions mediated by the activity of smooth muscle fibers, cardiac muscle fibers, and glands.

Some body signals that you are low in B5: burning, numbness or tingling in the feet, muscle weakness, swollen tongue (glossitis), cracks at the corner of your mouth (chilosis), recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (colds), fatigue, postural hypotension, hypochlohydria, GERD/heartburn, and depression.

Sources of B5:  whole grains, broccoli, kale, cabbage family of vegetables, mushrooms, legumes & lentils, avocado, eggs, milk, poultry and organ meats.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine/pyridoxyl/pyridoxamine) is involved in over 50 enzymatic reactions and potentially effects the function of cardiovascular, skin health, blood production, nerve function, healthy pregnancy, blood sugar regulation and cognitive function. Signs of deficiency include anxiety, depression, insomnia, irritability, confusion, abdominal pain, weakness, seizures, anemia, and poor immune function. There is even a rare form of B6 deficient epilepsy.

B6 requirements increase with diseases that affect absorption such as Celiac disease. The increased prevalence of hydrazine and hydrazide compounds as found in aerospace fuels, anti-toxicants in the petroleum industry, plating materials in metal manufacturing and ripening agents used on plants. B6-zapping hydrazine is also found in tobacco smoke, tartrazine (FD &C yellow food dyes). There are numerous drugs that deplete B6 and lead to common sides effects such as neuralgias, depression and anxiety.  Those with Parkinson’s disease should consult a medical expert before supplementing with B6 as it can interfere with L-dopa when taken without carbidopa.

Food sources of B6 include potatoes, bananas, meat, poultry, fish and whole grains.

Vitamin B12: Methyl or Hydroxyl cobalamin. Measured via B12 serum levels. Falsely elevated B12 levels may exist in those with renal failure or hepatitis. Those with vegan diets are at increased risk of deficiency as major food sources are animal based.

Pernicious anemia is the result of loss of intrinsic factor, a protein that is excreted by the stomach and helps B12 absorption in the small intestine. If the stomach has low acidity as in long term use of proton pump inhibitors (a lot of medications ending in “-prazole”, presence of H.pylori, aging or damaged parietal cells as in autoimmune disease, or the small intestine mucosa is damaged as in Celiac or Crohn’s disease, B12 absorption will be reduced. Additionally those on long term use of psyllium (Metamucil) will be at increased risk of B12 deficiency. Large amounts of orally dosed B12 may help compensate by allowing for absorption by diffusion. Intramuscular injection (IM) of B12 (available with Dr. Laura) by passing the need for intrinsic factor. IM or intravenous B12 is also more helpful than oral supplementation for those with a defect in the transportation system of B12 to the brain or a an accelerated breakdown of B12 in the brain tissue. Signs of B12 dependency are dementia, depression, headaches, insomnia or chronic fatigue.

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is important in immune function, collagen formation (for skin and connective tissue), neurotransmitter formation, plays a role in fighting viruses and bacteria and is a key anti-oxidant. Scurvy is the severe form of vitamin C deficiency. Fatigue, depression and anxiety of health are acute signs preceding the diagnosis of scurvy. Signs are bleeding abnormalities due to poor connective tissue formation and possible vitamin C deficiency include bleeding nose, easy bruising, bleeding gums, bone pain, osteoporosis, arthralgias (pain stiffness and joint swelling), myalgias (muscle aches and pains), edema (swelling), and symptoms of suggestive of cardiovascular disease or mimicking peripheral vasculitis, or venus thrombosis.

Dose limiting symptoms of vitamin C are diarrhea and cramping.  Vitamin C increases the absorption of non-heme iron this is good for those with low levels of iron/anemia. Vitamin C also seems to help the absorption of aluminum, which isn’t so good as it builds up in the bone, brain and liver and may contribute to the development of osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease. Avoid taking vitamin C at the same time as antacids, or aluminum hydroxide compounds. Chewable vitamin C may erode your dental enamel (it is an acid). Vitamin C supplementation can help or hinder the function of various medications; check with your medical practitioner for details.

Good sources of vitamin C include bell peppers, citrus fruits, cantaloupe, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, potatoes. Vitamin C is lost in high temperature and prolonged cooking.

 Vitamin D (cholecalciferol) The body makes vitamin D when the skin is exposed to sunshine or ultraviolet light. About 20 min of unprotected exposure mid day in the summer months in Ontario will produce about 1000IU of vitamin D. Small amounts may be found in food sources such as fish, egg yolk, beef liver, however, when sunlight is inadequate (no exposure or seasonal variance), supplementation is essential.

Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and phosphorous, builds bone mineral matrix, helps the nerves and muscles function, boosts the immune system, and modulates autoimmune diseases. When the supplemental D3 taken with K2, vitamin D helps get calcium out of the blood stream and into the bones. Vitamin D deficiency can be suspect in multiple sclerosis, cancer, pancreatic deficiency, Crohn’s, Colitis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, chronic low back pain, or severe muscle weakness. You may purchase D3+K2 drops at Forward Health.

Vitamin E: There are 8 different kinds of vitamin E – each a different type of tocopherol. Vitamin E is known as an antioxidant and the most potent, bioavailable form is alpha-tocopherol. When supplementing it is best to have a mixed or blend of tocopherols. Vitamin E is also involved in anticoagulation (inhibits platelet aggregation), is anti-inflammatory and stabilizes the cell membrane. Those with fat malabsorption issues at risk for deficiency. Vitamin E is also depleted in those with a high consumption of fatty foods, as thermally oxidized vegetable oil depletes vitamin E status. Good food sources of vitamin E include almond oil, wheat germ oil, nuts and seeds, whole grains, egg yolks and leafy green vegetables.

Vitamin K: There are actually four different kinds of Vitamin K. Vitamin K1 is what is often tracked so closely for those on warfarin because warfarin is an anticoagulant and affects the INR – the measurement we use to factor coagulation, or thickening of blood. Vitamin K1 is found in lots of leafy greens. K1 is also given to newborns to help prevent hemorrhage; a newborns’ intestinal tract is not yet making its own Vitamin K. K2 is made by some bacteria in our gastrointestinal tract, and by bacteria in some foods, like brie cheese. K2 helps Vitamin D3 get Calcium into the bones, so is useful in those suffering with osteoporosis or steroid induced bone loss and also can help lower total cholesterol in people on kidney dialysis. K3 and K4 still have much research pending. Those with Celiac disease not on a gluten free diet, chemotherapy, anticonvulsants or antibiotics may be at risk of vitamin K depletion, most likely due to the disruption in the bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract.

Good food sources of Vitamin K include dark leafy greens and to maximize absorption are best eaten with a source of fat (butter, olive oil, coconut oil, avocados). Olive oil actually is a source of vitamin K1 so it’s on double duty! Cheese, especially brie, egg yolks and fermented soy beans (natto) are also sources of Vitamin K.

Again, emphasize a diet with a full variety of  fresh wholesome foods, rather than supplementation. There are cases however where supplementation for the short term, and sometimes even the long term, is necessary for optimum health status. A naturopathic doctor has the training and resources to help you decide what is best for your individual requirements.

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Source:

Gaby, A. (2011) Nutritional Medicine. Fritz Perlberg Publishing. Concord, NH.

Cholesterol: The New, the Tried and the Natural

Lower Cholesterol

Let’s take a moment to remember what cholesterol is all about, take a look at the traditional statin drugs, some newer medications on the market and talk a little about natural therapies that can provide valuable service to your cardiovascular health.

I want help now

The big push over the last few decades has been to lower cholesterol to lower the risk cardiovascular events such as pulmonary emboli, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Sometimes we get so caught up in lowering one marker, we loose sight of the bigger picture. Cholesterol is only one component to cardiovascular health, however it is one that can be easily targeted with medication and tracked through blood analysis.

Cholesterol is a necessary component and building block for many of our hormones, Vitamin D and substances that help with digestion. We could not survive without it. The trouble comes when excessive cholesterol populates our blood stream, it is easily oxidized and creates deposits called plaques in our arteries.

Excessive cholesterol comes from our diet (cholesterol, trans fat, saturated fats or even if we consume too many carbohydrates) or from hereditary factors that affect cholesterol production. The plaques take up space and narrow the path that our blood flows through. When the plaque builds up enough it can block our blood supply, starving off the tissue it is designed to feed – this is an infarction.

The word infarction means “plug up or cram”.  Sometimes a piece of the plaque can break off (emboli) and float through our blood stream and get caught in areas where the vessels are narrowed like our brain or lung and lead to a restriction of blood supply (another type of infarction).  A myocardial infarction (MI) is when an area of the heart is starved of oxygen and the muscle tissue subsequently dies. A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is where there is temporary interruption of blood flow in the brain. A hemorrhage is where the integrity of the blood vessel wall fails and blood escapes.

Ok, so it makes sense to pay attention to excess cholesterol!

The Stats on Statins

 HMG Co-A Reductase Inhibitors (i.e. atorvastatin/Lipitor, Fluvastatin/Lescol, lovastatin/Mevacor, pravastatin/Pravachol, simvastatin/Zocor, rosuvastatin/Crestor)

Cost at most $300/year CND

Generally: statins reduce LDL by 20-60%, increase HDL by 5-15% and reduce Triglycerides by 7-30% Statins are prescribed more to reduce cardiovascular event risk, rather than to reduce cholesterol levels.

Evidence of being able to treat to target levels doesn’t exist. Research has found that less than half of patients on 80mg per day will achieve at target LDL of <2mmol/L.

Most will find if they have no benefit at 10mg, they will not have any increased benefit at 80mg. Also, on the note of dosage, higher dosed statins affect HbA1c, a factor measuring your blood sugar and risk of type II diabetes. In a pooled analysis of data from 5 statin trials, intensive-dose statin therapy was associated with an increased risk of new-onset diabetes compared with moderate-dose statin therapy.

Women:  For women, unless they have existing cardiovascular disease there is no evidence that lowering their lipids will decrease their risk of coronary heart disease related death.

 Men: For primary prevention in men, the absolute benefit of statins use over 5 years (the reduction of major coronary events) is around 1.5%. That means if their risk of cardiovascular disease was 8 or 9% with no statins, while on statins, their risk is 7%. For secondary prevention in men (meaning they have already had one coronary event) their absolute benefit is 4%. This means if they have had a stroke, heart attack, heart failure, angina, TIA in the past, if they take the statin their risk is 16% where as if they didn’t it would be 20%.

Simvastatin is a first line of therapy. In one study, for every 12 people treated, one life was saved. Another study showed over 5.4 years of therapy for every 31 people treated, 1 death is prevented. Simvastatin will reduce LDL by 35% and usually the prescribed amount is 20-40mg daily.

Most common side effect: Often induces muscle pain (myopathy or at extreme rhabdomylosis).

About 50% of people will stop taking statins after 3 years due to their adverse effects.

Muscle pain aggravated by alcohol, advanced age (>80), chronic renal insufficiency, grapefruit juice, small body frame, liver health, untreated hypothyroidism, gender (women more affected than men), infections, perioperative periods, vigorous exercise, vitamin D deficiency. Drugs that will increase the muscle aches: Amiodarone, Azole antifungals, Calcium channel blockers, Cyclosporine, HIV protease inhibitors, Fibrates, Macrolide antibiotics (clarithromycin, erythromycin), and occasionally Nicotinic acid. If there is potential for drug interaction, the best choice is pravastatin.

 

What about the new drugs?

Alirocumab (Praluent ) about $14,600/yr USD

Evolocumab (Repatha ) about $14,100/yr USD

Benefit is there is no muscle pain however these are at a much higher cost and are self-injected every two to four weeks rather than taken orally. They work by blocking PCSK9 inhibitors, (monoclonal antibodies) and the medication is able to lower the LDL cholesterol circulating in the blood. Research is limited however so far it shows to lower LDL levels by about 60 percent. It also lowers the risk of heart attack and mortality related to heart disease over about a one to two-year follow-up.

What is available naturally?

Limit dietary cholesterol intake to <300mg per day

Restrict transfats and saturated fats

Limit carbohydrate intake

Eat more vegetables and fruit

Increase plant sterol intake to 1g 2x/day

Include up to 40g of fibre per day (most North Americans get <8g per day!)

Limit alcohol to 1 drink per day for women and 2 for men – have some days alcohol free

Regular Exercise

A Good Night Sleep

Supplements to help regulate blood glucose & incorporate healthy fats

There are numerous cardiovascular supplements you may wish to consider with your healthcare practitioner. Too many to mention here and they are specific to an individual’s overall need and one must be careful to have the right dose, duration and be sure there is no interaction with other medications or supplements.

 See Dr. Laura M. Brown ND for your personalized cholesterol lowering treatment plan

Fish Oil

One universal supplement that has been well studied is Fish Oil. Omega 3 and now new to the market Omega 7 has shown to be of benefit for many health factors. Omega 3 is well researched and there are over 20,000 published scientific reports that support its health benefits, including that are cardiovascular health. Fish oil has been shown to reduce serum triglyceride levels. A recent report on Omega 7 shows in a double blind placebo controlled study with 60 subjects and a baseline C Reactive Protein (inflammatory marker) at 2-5mg/L showed a 44% drop in CRP. You can look for Omega 3’s and will find them in most health food stores. On a side note, Metagenics has some serious research behind the Omega 7 and has combined the 3+7 in a formula rightfully called Mega 10. You can find Mega 10 at Forward Health.

 From the heart and mind of your local naturopathic doctor, Dr. Laura M. Brown ND.

References available upon request.