Dr. Laura on Mould and Indoor Air Quality

Mould is very important factor in indoor air quality. If you are chronically ill and can’t seem to shake it, test the places you spend time.

Mould Related Health Issues

  • nasal stuffiness
  • throat irritation
  • coughing or wheezing
  • eye irritation
  • skin irritation

The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention  is firm about the removal of any visible mould. Health impacts vary from person to person. Mould, once inhaled, can grow in the lungs and upper respiratory tract. It also has the potential to spread through the rest of the body.

Where is Mould found?

Mould is found where there is moisture, on just about any surface and can be tracked from place to place. Be sure to check basements, bathrooms, laundry room, kitchen, roofs and around leaky pipes. A professional can be hired to investigate anything beyond a visual check. Or if you are up to it, there are some at home kits available. The Amazon DIY Mold kit (Americans spell it without the “u”) or try the Canadian option, which includes air tests at http://www.CanadaMoldTestKits.com‎ (they must sell to Americans!)

What’s the proper indoor humidity?

Too dry and your nasal passages can dry out and make you more susceptible to infection. Too humid and the dampness can be a breeding ground for mould and mildew.

Indoor humidity should be kept around 45-50%.

A humidity reader, also called a hygrometer, is available at any local hardware store. Review and compare some of the best hygrometers evaluated in 2018.

De-humidfiers are helpful in damp spaces. Their filters should be kept clean and collection bins rinsed with white vinegar every couple of weeks. Humidity in Ontario is generally higher spring through fall and drier once the indoor heating starts.

 Health issues persist?

Long term exposure to mould means you need some serious detoxification. If health related mould issues persist, a visit with Dr. Laura may help you clean up the damage and get clear of the problems.

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND