Dr. Kyle: Building Stronger Bones

When discussing bone health, we often talk about proper nutrition. Adequate vitamin D and calcium intake are usually recommended to enhance bone mineral density (BMD). What is not discussed as often is the role of exercise and weight training for increasing bone strength. A holistic approach looking at what we put IN our body as well as what we DO with our body is the key for building stronger bones.

As we age our body experiences several physiological changes. Our hormone levels change, muscle mass declines, and bones become less dense. Low bone density, otherwise known as osteopenia, increases our risk of fracture. Although we can bounce back from a slip or fall in our early years, a hip fracture in older individuals can have detrimental effects on quality of life. The good news is, there are important steps you can take to prevent or slow down the decline of BMD.

Research has demonstrated that healthy individuals and patients with osteoporosis can improve BMD with high-moderate impact activities and resistance training. A few examples of high impact exercises include step classes, jogging, and jumping jacks. Resistance or weight training on the other hand can include elastic band, pully, and free-weight based exercises. To put it simply, the more force you transmit through the bone, the more the bone will remodel and grow! Clinical judgment is needed to determine the intensity of force that each patient can tolerate.

Recent studies have found that high-intensity resistance training and impact training improves BMD and physical function in postmenopausal women. Low-intensity and light-resistance exercise programs are not enough to stimulate bone remodelling and improve BMD. Heavy multi-joint compound exercises such as squats and deadlifts induce extensive muscle recruitment and transmit greater force through the bones. In particular, these exercises will apply force through the lumbar spine and femoral neck, making them stronger and more resilient to fracture. Proper form and supervision are crucial when performing any high intensity or heavy loading activities.

Talk to a primary health care provider about your BMD and if an exercise program for developing BMD is right for you. Not only will exercise strengthen your bones, but it will have profound impacts on many other systems of the body as well. As always, if you have any question do not hesitate to contact me at drkyle@forwardhealth.ca or visit my Instagram page @drkylearam!

Reference:

Sinaki M. Exercise for patients with established osteoporosis. InNon-Pharmacological Management of Osteoporosis 2017 (pp. 75-96). Springer, Cham.

Mounsey A, Jones A, Tybout C. Does a formal exercise program in postmenopausal women decrease osteoporosis and fracture risk?. Evidence-Based Practice. 2019 Apr 1;22(4):29-31.

Dr. Phil Shares: What You Need to Know About Going to a Chiropractor

What You Need to Know About Going to a Chiropractor

The chiropractor. A lot of people swear by chiropractic treatments as the only way they get relief from back pain, neck pain, headaches, and a host of joint problems. Others aren’t so sure about this holistic wellness discipline. Regardless of what camp you’re in, allow us to demystify this type of care for you.

Chiropractors Train as Long as MDs Do

That’s right, a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) studies for four years of undergraduate and four years of chiropractic school, using similar books that MDs use for study, says Scott Bautch, DC, president of the council on occupational health for the American Chiropractic Association. Chiropractors must also pass a licensure test and take continuing education courses to stay abreast of the latest trends in their field and maintain their credentials.

Chiropractors Can Help with Overall Wellness

People mostly see chiropractors for pain relief, but it’s becoming more popular to see a chiropractor for general wellness. “Chiropractors are increasingly becoming overall wellness advisors — advising patients about their eating , exercise, and sleeping habits,” Bautch says. Since chiropractors focus on the health of the nervous system, particularly the spinal cord, they are treating the entire body. Therefore, they are addressing both acute injuries (such as low back pain), as well as general, chronic issues (such as fatigue).

The First Appointment Will be Really Thorough

Chiropractors use comprehensive intake screenings to learn not just about what ails you, but also to get a complete picture of your overall health (hence the “holistic” descriptor). This will include health history questionnaires as well as functional and neurological assessments to see how your body moves, how well you can balance, etc. The doctor may also take x-rays. Finally, there will be a discussion about cost and course of treatment.

This thorough first appointment was experienced by New York City resident Karl Burns. In a tennis game, Burns swung his racket too forcefully and injured his low back. He was referred to chiropractor Cory Gold, DC. “At first, I thought, ‘I’ve never been injured before, I don’t need a voodoo doctor,’” says Burns. “But Dr. Gold and I immediately gelled. After many tests and questions, he told me, ‘Your treatment plan will be three times a week for a couple weeks, then two times a week for a couple weeks, then once a week — this is not a lifetime injury.’”

You’ll Likely Be a Regular, Initially

In most cases, people see chiropractors for acute injuries (like throwing your back out) or chronic conditions (like headaches), so it may take a few of weeks of multiple visits to stabilize the problem. After a few weeks of multiple treatments per week, treatment tapers gradually to once per week, then once per month for maintenance, until the spine is able to stay in alignment without the chiropractor’s adjustments. The course of treatment and length of time until stabilization vary from person to person.

That said, visits are often quite short — an average of 15 to 20 minutes — of hands-on manipulation. “Chiropractors aren’t trying to fight an internal battle against infection the way medical doctors are,” says Burns. “The treatment consists of much smaller movements and adjustments to your body and alignment of the spine.” Burns points out that he experienced pretty significant pain relief from the get-go. “Every time I walked out of there, I felt amazing,” he says. “The benefits are instant and can be perceived better [than with conventional doctors].”

You Won’t Be a Patient Forever

There’s a general belief that chiropractors want to make you reliant on them, but Bautch and Burns believe otherwise. “There are three phase of care,” Bautch says. “Acute — let’s get you functional; corrective — let’s adjust you so that it doesn’t happen again or as frequently; and then maintenance — maybe down to once a month.” Indeed, this is what Burns experienced — but he also learned the hard way the importance of self-maintenance. “Chiropractors take the approach of ‘let me teach you how to fish,’ not ‘let me just give you the fish,’” says Burns. He, like most patients, was given exercises to compliment and maintain his recovery — and he only ran into trouble again once he stopped doing them. “If I skip my exercises, sure enough, my lower back gets tight,” Burns says.

BY: Amy Roberts

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Dr. Kyle: Manipulation and Mobilization for Neck Pain

An estimated 66% of the population will suffer from neck pain in their lifetime (1). Neck pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal conditions treated by healthcare professionals. Often patients will report pain due to sleeping awkwardly, turning their head too fast, or reaching for something overhead. Whatever the mechanism, neck pain accounts for a significant proportion of sick leave, healthcare costs and lost productivity. Chiropractors have been at the forefront of treating neck pain for decades, and the results speak for themselves.

What does the evidence suggest?

Previous systematic reviews on chronic mechanical neck pain have provided substantial evidence for the effectiveness of chiropractic care. Both spinal manipulation and mobilization have been shown to be a viable option of care as compared to other standard treatment methods (2).

A recent systematic review by Coulter et. al. compared spinal manipulation and mobilization to other active modalities such as acupuncture, massage, and exercise to name a few (3). The study looked at patient outcomes such as pain, disability and health related quality of life (HRQol). They found that many previous reviews regarding non-specific neck pain reported evidence in favor of manipulation and mobilization. Other reviews concluded that manual therapies in conjunction with exercise provided superior results as compared to manual therapy alone (4).

As with many musculoskeletal conditions, it appears that a multi-modal approach is best. At this point in time, there is moderate evidence to support manipulation and mobilization for the treatment of chronic nonspecific neck pain in terms of pain and function. It appears that some movement and active rehabilitation is better for patient recovery then complete rest. More studies are still required to look at the benefits of chiropractic manual therapies long term.

To some, these conclusions may not be overwhelming, but research like this is what continues to carry the chiropractic profession in a positive direction. It is exciting to know that chiropractors and researchers alike are looking into the efficacy and safety of chiropractic care so we can better treat our patients and our community.

If you or someone you love is suffering with lingering neck pain, it may be time to schedule a comprehensive chiropractic exam to get to the root of the problem. As always, if you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me at drkyle@forwardhealth.ca or visit my professional Instagram page @drkylearam.

References:

1. Cote P, Cassidy JD, Carroll L; The Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey. The prevalence of neck pain and related disability in Saskatchewan adults. Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 1998; 23:1689-1698

2. Bronfort G, Haas M, Evans RL, Bouter LM. Efficacy of spinal manipulation and mobilization for low back pain and neck pain: A systematic review and best evidence synthesis. Spine J 2004; 4:335-356.

3. Herman, P. M. (2019). Manipulation and Mobilization for Treating Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis for an Appropriateness Panel. Pain Physician, 22, E55-E70.

4. Brison RJ, Hartling L, Dostaler S, LegerA, Rowe BH, Stiell I, Pickett W. A randomized controlled trial of an educational intervention to prevent the chronic pain of whiplash associated disorders following rear-end motor vehicle collisions. Spine 2005; 30:1799-1807.

Dr. Kyle: The Facts On Foam Rolling

Foam rolling or self-myofascial release is a common technique that is used to reduce the sensation of muscle soreness. It is most often performed by placing a foam roller on the ground and rolling a particular muscle out using your bodyweight to compress the tissue. This has been used extensively in the past decade as a form of muscle recovery pre or post workout.

Is foam rolling all its hyped up to be?

I have recently come across some not-so-hot reviews on foam rolling and its effects on muscle recovery and performance. Before coming to any conclusion, I decided to consult the latest research.

Here is a short list of the potential Pros and Cons of foam rolling to help you decide for yourself:

Cons:

• Foam rolling can apply excessive pressure to the tissue. Too much pressure can cause muscle and nerve cells to rupture. Foam rolling with small diameter rollers or lacrosse balls can exceed tolerable cell pressure (1).
• Foam rolling will not break down scar tissue. Scaring is produced by strong fibrotic connections between cells that can withstand forces produced by self-myofascial release techniques.
• Foam rolling has little effect on increasing mobility and may even increase pain in the process.

Pros:

• Rolling can speed up recovery. Extended foam rolling sessions can increase blood flow to the area and enhance nutrient exchange and clearing of cellular debris.
• Reduces inflammation and causes draining of lymphatic pooling.
• Foam rolling may have minimal positive effects on sprint times and overall athletic performance (2).
• May increase proprioception (joint position sense) immediately prior to exercise (3).
• Foam rolling releases tightness. Sustained external pressure stimulates the nervous system to decrease muscle tone.

Remember, this is just the tip of the iceberg. There are tons of information out there on foam rolling, some good and some not so good. Much of the research I read showed conflicting results making it difficult to draw conclusions. Here is a list of my best recommendations:

• Keep it light! Gentle-moderate pressure will generate positive stimulus without causing cell damage.
• Target specific areas of muscle stiffness to enhance recovery and decrease muscle tone.
• Foam roll after your workout to decrease inflammation.
• Supplement foam rolling with stretching, corrective exercises, muscle activation and soft tissue therapy techniques.

Have questions? Visit my Instagram page @drkylearam or email me at drkyle@forwardhealth.ca for more information!

https://www.instagram.com/drkylearam/

References:

1. Gonzalez-Rodriguez, D., Guillou, L., Cornat, F., Lafaurie-Janvore, J., Babataheri, A., de Langre, E., … & Husson, J. (2016). Mechanical criterion for the rupture of a cell membrane under compression. Biophysical journal, 111(12), 2711-2721.

2. Miller, K. L., Costa, P. B., Coburn, J. W., & Brown, L. E. (2019). THE EFFECTS OF FOAM ROLLING ON MAXIMAL SPRINT PERFORMANCE AND RANGE OF MOTION. Journal of Australian Strength & Conditioning, 27(01), 15-26.

3. David, E., Amasay, T., Ludwig, K., & Shapiro, S. (2019). The Effect of Foam Rolling of the Hamstrings on Proprioception at the Knee and Hip Joints. International Journal of Exercise Science, 12(1), 343-354.

Dr. Kyle: 5 Tips To Boost Testosterone

Feeling slowed down? Always tired? Dwindling sex drive? These may be signs that you are suffering from low testosterone.

You may think that supplementing with testosterone is exclusive to hardcore bodybuilders. Social media is often flooded with testosterone boosting supplements that are marketed to increase muscle mass and improve physique.

Whatever the reason, more and more average Joes are turning to testosterone supplementation. According to recent studies, an increasing number of men are being diagnosed with hypogonadism. After discovering that their hormone levels are below average, many turn to their family doctor to start hormone replacement therapy. Others are looking to boost their levels naturally through diet, exercise and lifestyle modifications.

Here are 5 simple tips to naturally boost testosterone:

1. Exercise

• Not only will exercise improve muscle strength, bone density and balance, regular physical activity will boost serum testosterone levels as well. Weight training and high intensity interval training are the most effective forms of exercise to increase testosterone.

2. Diet

• Get a sufficient and healthy balance of proteins, fats and carbs. Eating lots of high-quality proteins will improve testosterone levels and enhance fat loss. Don’t over eat and don’t restrict food intake for too long either. Some testosterone boosting foods include oysters, tuna, almonds, egg yolks and beef.

3. Sleep

• Sufficient hours of sleep will vary person to person. It is recommended that you get 7-9 hours of sleep per night as a young adult. As we age this number will drop. Those that sleep <4 hours per night are often testosterone deficient. Men who sleep 5-6 hours per night have testosterone levels equivalent to men 10 years older! Must I continue? Sleep!

4. Minimize stress

• Research has shown that long periods of stress lead to chronically high cortisol levels. Too much cortisol in the system causes a reduction in testosterone. Stress often leads to over eating and accumulation of fat, thereby lowering testosterone levels further. Consider meditation or finding an activity you really enjoy. Be sure to utilize the strategies above to keep your stress in check.

5. Supplement

• A number of herbal supplements may help reduce symptoms associated with low testosterone. In addition to increasing testosterone levels, the herb “Ashwagandha” is thought to reduce stress, improve brain function, lower blood sugar and reduce inflammation. Ginger extract may produce similar improvements. Prohormones such as Tribulus terrestris, Tinospora cordifolia, and icariin (horny goat weed) have not demonstrated significant improvements in testosterone in human trials.

Have any questions or concerns? Contact me at drkyle@forwardhealth.ca and visit @drkylearam on Instagram and facebook.

References:

Kovac, J. R., Pan, M., Arent, S., & Lipshultz, L. I. (2016). Dietary adjuncts for improving testosterone levels in hypogonadal males. American journal of men’s health, 10(6), NP109-NP117.

Carol S. Johnston, Sherrie L. Tjonn, Pamela D. Swan; High-Protein, Low-Fat Diets Are Effective for Weight Loss and Favorably Alter Biomarkers in Healthy Adults, The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 134, Issue 3, 1 March 2004, Pages 586–591, https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/134.3.586

SamuelMelamed*†UrsulaUgarten‡ArieShirom§LunaKahana∥YehudaLerman†PaulFroom*† Chronic burnout, somatic arousal and elevated salivary cortisol levels Journal of Psychosomatic Research Volume 46, Issue 6, June 1999, Pages 591-598

Walker, M. P. (2017). Why we sleep: Unlocking the power of sleep and dreams.

D. C. Cumming, M. E. Quigley, S. S. C. Yen; Acute Suppression of Circulating Testosterone Levels by Cortisol in Men, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 57, Issue 3, 1 September 1983, Pages 671–673, https://doi.org/10.1210/jcem-57-3-671

Ambiye, V. R., Langade, D., Dongre, S., Aptikar, P., Kulkarni, M., & Dongre, A. (2013). Clinical Evaluation of the Spermatogenic Activity of the Root Extract of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in Oligospermic Males: A Pilot Study. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2013, 571420.

Dr Phil Shares: The Best Exercises You Can’t Do Wrong

The Best Exercises You Can’t Do Wrong

No matter what exercise you do, it’s important to use great technique at all times. Period. You might be able to get away with sloppy form for a little bit, but eventually, it’ll catch up with you. That’s why it’s so valuable to have someone by your side, making sure you’re in the correct position and using the correct muscles.

But if don’t have the luxury of hiring a personal trainer, consider doing exercises that are difficult to do incorrectly. It’s not that these movements are easy — it’s just that they force you to use proper technique, otherwise you can’t do them at all.

Welcome to the world of “self-limiting exercises.”

HOW SELF-LIMITING EXERCISES WORK

Most exercises require you to use strength and power to move weight. Self-limiting exercises, however, focus on correct posture, muscular activation, movement, balance and coordination — the moment you do things incorrectly, you won’t be able to do the exercise.

Suddenly, it takes your strength out of the equation. You can’t muscle your way through an exercise or even cheat; instead, these movements challenge you in different ways and force you to do things correctly.

For example, you might bench 250 pounds, but if you struggle to balance on one knee or one leg, you’ll struggle to move weights in that position.

By using self-limiting exercises, you’ll develop better coordination, balance and total-body muscular control, which helps you build a stronger and more powerful body.

5 SELF-LIMITING EXERCISES TO ADD TO YOUR ROUTINE

SINGLE-ARM, BOTTOMS-UP KETTLEBELL PRESS

By holding a kettlebell “bottoms-up” (with the large part above the handle), it instantly turns an exercise into a self-limiting exercise. That’s because, to keep the kettlebell balanced, your entire body — posture, core, etc. — needs to work in sync, otherwise the kettlebell will fall. (Even if you tried to squeeze the handle as hard as you could, it will still fall if you’re not balanced.)

By doing a press while balancing a kettlebell, you’ll build shoulder strength while targeting your stabilizing muscles.

The move: Stand and hold a kettlebell in the bottoms-up position by your shoulder. Press the kettlebell up without it falling, squeeze your glutes and tighten your abs throughout. Don’t think about pushing the kettlebell away from you; think about driving yourself into the ground.

SINGLE-ARM FARMER’S CARRIES

Farmer’s carries are a simple way to build a strong core and develop endurance. Once your grip gets tired or your posture breaks down, you won’t be able to go any further. (How’s that for self-limiting?

The move: Grab heavy dumbbells or kettlebells, stand tall with your chest up and shoulders back and walk. Try using just one arm for extra core work or varying your grip. For example, wrap a towel around each dumbbell and hold the towels instead of the handles.

SKATER SQUATS

Want to build strong legs and great lower-body stability and balance without worrying about hurting yourself? Skater squats are a great addition to your workout routine. Just go down and come back up. If you lose your balance, you’ll naturally stop; if you lack the strength, you’ll be stuck at the bottom.

The move: Start from standing and bend one foot behind you. Then, squat down while trying to touch your bent knee onto the ground behind you. Lean your torso and reach your arms forward as you descend. If you can’t reach the ground with your knee, that’s fine — just go as low as you can.

SINGLE-LEG ROMANIAN DEADLIFTS

The single-leg Romanian deadlift is one of the best exercises to strengthen your glutes, hamstrings and hip stabilizers. Even better, it encourages great technique, balance, coordination and muscle activation. To perform the exercise, you’ll have to do everything correctly — if something breaks down, you’ll automatically stop and put down your weights.

The move: Grab a dumbbell or kettlebell in your right hand. With your right leg, reach back as far as you can while sitting into your left hip. Keep your shoulders pulled back and imagine crushing your right armpit. Go down as far as you can while maintaining the natural arch in your lower back. Perform all your reps and switch sides.

HALF-KNEELING KETTLEBELL HALO

This is one of the best core exercises you’re (probably) not doing. First, halos hammer your core from many different angles while keeping your body neutral. Second, by getting on just one knee and reducing your “base of support,” it puts all the emphasis on your core, posture and balance — you simply cannot cheat this exercise.

The move: Get on one knee while keeping your feet in-line and hold one kettlebell in both hands with the large part over your hands. Keep your lower back neutral and make big circles around your head with the kettlebell. Do all your reps one way and then switch directions. Then, switch knees.

by Anthony J. Yeung

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

http://www.forwardhealth.ca

Dr. Kyle: Why You Should Use The Sauna

Everyone enjoys a day at the spa for some much-needed relaxation, but did you know that time spent in the sauna may actually increase muscle gains?

Originating in Finland, this traditional passive heat therapy is becoming increasing popular world-wide. Saunas are often used for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain as well as headaches. Recent evidence has suggested benefits for high-blood pressure, neurocognitive diseases and pulmonary conditions.

Emerging studies have found a protective effect for cardiovascular disease with regular sauna use for both men and women. It turns out, the more you use the sauna the better. More time spent sweating it out, the more health benefits!

Need any more reasons to hop in the sauna?

Sauna use has also been associated with increased net protein synthesis. This is why amenities such as saunas and steam rooms have become more common place in gym and fitness facilities. After your workout may be the best time to jump in the sauna and here’s why:

1. Intense short-term heat exposure stimulates the production of heat shock proteins that reduce muscle degeneration cause by oxidative stress.
2. Produce Growth hormone for increased lean muscle mass.
3. Increased NO (nitric oxide) availability to promote blood flow and circulation.
4. Decrease inflammatory pathway activity and free radical production.
5. Improve insulin sensitivity, allowing your body to utilize glucose more efficiently.
6. Enhance the production of BDNF (brain derived neurotropic factor) which synthesizes new brain cells.

Essentially, saunas stimulate the bodies autonomic nervous system in order to maintain a constant core body temperature in extreme heat. Short durations of heat stress induces adaptive mechanisms similar to exercise and have profound physiological effects.

It has also been found to help with anxiety, depression and improve parasympathetic function! Who doesn’t want a little extra mental clarity in their life.

For any questions or comments please email me at drkyle@forwardhealth.ca and be sure to follow my Instagram and Facebook page @drkylearam.

References:

Hussain, J., & Cohen, M. (2018). Clinical Effects of Regular Dry Sauna Bathing: A Systematic Review. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2018, 1857413. doi:10.1155/2018/1857413

Laukkanen, T., Kunutsor, S. K., Khan, H., Willeit, P., Zaccardi, F., & Laukkanen, J. A. (2018). Sauna bathing is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality and improves risk prediction in men and women: a prospective cohort study. BMC medicine, 16(1), 219. doi:10.1186/s12916-018-1198-0

Dr. Kyle: 4 easy steps to get rid of brain fog

For those of you who have ever experienced periods of brain fog, these tips are for you!

Common symptoms of brain fog include lack of focus, clarity, memory, and attention. Patients will often report feelings of anxiety or even confusion. For those of you who are high achievers, these daily lapses in judgment can put a halt on productivity. It’s time to reclaim your brain and boost your mental capacity!

There are a few key lifestyle hacks that will bring back your sharp mind and rid you of brain fog for good:

1. Reduce inflammation in your diet

• Remove food sensitivities (gluten, wheat, lectins, etc)
• Less carbs and plenty of healthy fats (grass-fed butter, coconut oil, animal fats)
• Fasting – upregulate brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) to help grow new brain cells!

2. Increase physical activity

• Lowers risk of developing depression and anxiety.
• Release BDNF and “feel good” neurotransmitters.
• Decrease pain perception and inflammation.
• Increase cerebral blood flow and improves cardiovascular health.
• Try high intensity interval training, sprint training and fast paced sports.

3. Sleep more

• Avoid blue light from computer/phone screens 2 hours before bed.
• Aim for 7-9 hours of sleep for optimal brain recovery.
• Try to sleep on your back, avoid sleeping on your stomach with head kinked to the side.
• Practice proper sleep hygiene: make sure room is pitch black, bed is comfortable, room at appropriate temperature, and noise reduced.

4. Mental detox

• Meditate every morning for 10 minutes (with diaphragmatic breathing).
• Avoid excessive caffeine and alcohol consumption.
• Practice mindfulness, gratitude, affirmation and self-compassion.
• Challenge your mind with puzzles, strategy games and creative projects.
• Take care of your mental health
• READ

For more health and nutrition tips follow me @drkylearam on Instagram and facebook!

Dr. Kyle: Sport Injury Rehabilitation

 

There are many factors to consider before clearing an athlete to return to sport. Time since injury, improvements in range of motion and increases in joint stability are all good metrics to evaluate before giving an athlete the green light.

Many rehabilitation programs focus primarily on enhancing maximal muscle strength. Current research suggests that Rate of Force Development (RFD) may actually be a better predictive factor in determining whether an athlete is ready for sport.

Common athletic maneuvers such as pivoting, jumping and stop-and-starts require rapid stabilization of the joints in the lower limb. This requires almost instantaneous muscle activation to prevent joint displacement and avoid re-injury. Factors such as neural activation, fiber composition and muscle contractile properties influence RFD and the body’s ability to absorb load on the joint. Therefore, it may not matter how strong the muscle is, but rather how fast the muscle can fire.

So how might this change rehabilitation programs?

Most physical rehabilitation protocols help build strength but fail to include an explosive component. Because athletic demands are often variable and unpredictable, it is important for the muscles to be able to react to any situation. Incorporating explosive plyometric exercises and a variation of sport specific drills will improve RFD and prevent future injury.

Take home points for sport-injury rehab:

• Allow sufficient time to for healing process to occur
• Recover full range of motion and flexibility
• Progressively overload the muscle to build strength
• Explosive training to enhance ability of muscle to generate force rapidly.
• Incorporate plyometric and sport specific drills to complement athletic demands.

As always, the best way to stay in the game is to avoid injury in the first place. So don’t wait for the pain to start before implementing an effective strength AND conditioning program.

If you or someone you know is suffering from a sport injury, call and book an appointment today for a complete musculoskeletal assessment!

 

Reference:
Buckthorpe, M., & Roi, G. S. (2018). The time has come to incorporate a greater focus on rate of force development training in the sports injury rehabilitation process. Muscles, ligaments and tendons journal, 7(3), 435-441. doi:10.11138/mltj/2017.7.3.435

Tips to Improve Your Running

Do you want to run farther? Run faster? Or simply run with greater ease? These tips are for you!

 

 

Cadence

• Try to run at a rate of 180steps/min. This will help decrease the force per stride on your knees, reduce risk of injury and minimize wear-and-tear on the joints.

Mid-foot Strike

• Leading foot should land under your center of mass. When you heel strike ahead of your center of mass it creates a backwards “braking force” that makes each stride less efficient and will slow you down.

Hip Stability

• The pelvis needs to be stable and hips should remain at the same level. If the hips are moving up and down with each stride, this may be an indication of glute weakness and poor muscular control.

Rotation

• Core should be stable and prevent rotation through the torso. Arms should swing straight back and forward and not side-to-side across the body.
TIP: your feet will follow the direction you swing your arms.

Bounce

• The force you generate should be propelling you forward and not upward. Reducing vertical oscillation will limit wasted energy.
TIP: less ground contact is optimal.

Hip Extension:

• Hips must be mobile enough to extend the leg back past your body. Proper glute activation will help extend the hip back and save the stress on your low back.

Try to incorporate one tip at a time into your daily or weekly run. If you have any questions on proper running technique feel free to email me at drkyle@forwardhealth.ca!