Dr. Laura: The Science of Eating a Rainbow

The colours that our foods employ are very functional and serve a purpose. Phytonutrients are vast and the last time I counted, there were over 5,000 known.

Allow me to introduce Dr. Deana Minich, MD. She has dedicated her career to express why, in scientific means, we should “eat” a rainbow. In the chart below she simplifies how different coloured foods serve our body.

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What makes this even more interesting is that this chart also closely reflects the colours that relate to the energy centres of the body called chakras. This makes eating polyphenol rich foods easy to prescribe!

Eating a variety of vegetables and fruits is critical to good nutrition. Try 6 cups of vegetables a day and 1-3 cups of fruit per day. Choose foods for their vital nutrient function in ways that serve the needs of your body.

Plant Power!

Turns out, mother nature has packed a punch of power in the plant kingdom. Many plants contain one or more of these 5,000 nutritional perks that helps us:

  • Defend against pathogens, parasites, and predators.
  • Protect against chronic disease, including cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration, and cancer.
  • Purify and renew the blood
  • Nourish
  • Cleanse body of toxins
  • Stimulate effects
  • Relaxing effects
  • Anti-inflammatory

So next time you are in the grocery store, hit the fresh produce aisle and think “Eat a Rainbow”! You just might find the gold that exists at the end of it…your good health.

From the heart and research of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

Dr. Laura’s Gingerbread Protein Balls

Love gingerbread? Pack a nutritional punch into this high protein, healthy fat holiday snack!
Having holiday treats doesn’t always have to mean eating poorly. One-two of these gingerbread balls will pack a punch of protein, iron, calcium, fibre, healthy fats and anti-inflammatory spices.

Ingredients:

1/2c Designs for Health Vanilla Pea Protein (available at the clinic)
1Tbsp ground cinnamon
1Tbsp ground ginger
1/8 tsp ground Himalayan Pink sea salt
1/3c coconut butter
1/3c molasses
1/2c shredded unsweetened coconut + 1/4 cup for rolling balls in later
Mix thoroughly. If need more ginger or cinnamon – add to your taste
Roll into little balls
Roll into the extra coconut
Store in fridge. (they will firm up when cold)
Front the heart and kitchen of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

Carb Cravings? 5 easy tips

Craving carbohydrates and don’t know how to get them under control?

Here are 5 easy steps to help put you back in control.

  1. Test your Candida levels.
  2. Eat a meal with protein and healthy fats
  3. Eat within your 30 min glycemic window after exercise
  4. Eliminate processed foods
  5. Deal with your stress.

Candida?

If your Candida abicans levels are out of balance, you will find you have an insatiable sweet tooth, always need something sweet after a meal and suffer from a mix of possible symptoms like brain fog, headaches, sinusitis, join pain, skin rashes, bloating, gas and diarrhea. These crazy critters can actually yank on your nervous system chain, send messages to your brain saying “I want sugar”!! So, don’t blame your self wholly, however it is you who has to take responsibility. Just like saying to a child “no, you can’t have a cookie right now” you have to put your foot down and say the same to yourself. Or those terrible little Candida critters who are running your world right now. How do you know if it’s you or them? How do you get rid of them?

A simple 15 minute test in our clinic will help you get a sense for your levels of Candida. Email drlaura@forwardhealth.ca. Getting your micro biome back in balance will also reduce inflammation and restore nutrient absorption. With scientifically proven therapies, my patients are able to reduce Candida albicans levels and re-set many micro biomes within 1-3 months of therapy.

Boost Nutrient Density

Sometimes when we crave sweets we actually need to eat something with protein and healthy fat to increase nutrient density and satiation. For example, try eating a handful of almonds and an apple or a slice of chicken or turkey with some avocado – then wait 5-10 minutes and see if you still crave the sweets.

30 Minute Glycemic Index

After an intense workout, you have depleted the glycogen stores in the muscles. To optimize energy for your next workout and balance your carb intake later, eat something with carbohydrates in it within thirty minutes of working out. For some this means a quick protein drink with some carbs in it, an orange or a banana or a healthy homemade nutball. Eating a full balanced meal with in two hours of your workout will also help balance your blood sugar and keep you from craving carbohydrates.

Ditch the Processed Foods

Processed foods often have little fibre and a lot of sugar. This means the sugar from the food gets quick access to your blood stream. what results are spikes in your blood sugar levels, triggering an influx of insulin to quickly get the levels under control. Consequently,   your blood sugar quickly drops and you feel like you need to have more to eat. On it goes, the sugar craving roller coaster. Instead, try to eat foods high in fibre, with some proteins and healthy fats so your blood sugar levels are more regulated.

Get Stress Under Control

Serotonin and dopamine are feel good neurotransmitter which get depleted in stress. Eating carbohydrates helps boost these neurotransmitters. This is why, when we feel stressed, we crave comfort foods, which are carbohydrate based. Secondly, elevated cortisol will increased the demand for carbohydrate consumption because it blunts the desire for proteins and vegetables. Learn how to emotionally regulate and manage your stress and you will find it easier to naturally make healthier food choices.

From the heart and mind of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

 

Function of Fibre

 Fibre is a form of carbohydrate found in plants. It plays a major role in softening and bulking the stool, promoting regular elimination of waste.  Fibre feeds and balances the micro biome in our gastrointestinal tract.  A diet high in fibre leads to better blood sugar regular, sustained energy and wellbeing.

Good Fibrations

Okay, Forty Three Eighty Fitness fans, this week’s focus in on fibre. Now I don’t really focus on carbohydrates per se, as you noticed in the 6 Daily Diet Tips you all have now. Most people do better on setting their eyes on good fibre. Why the Beach Boys’ song Good Vibrations  comes to mind just now, makes me laugh. What if we had a song called  Good Fibrations?  What would we sing about then? Yes, fibre can make you sing, but not always the way you’d like. So, if you are used to take out food and a lot of white carbs (sugar, bread, crackers, chips etc.,) don’t go wild on adding the fibre all at once. Increase a little day by day. Otherwise, if you are not rushing out  your fitness class before you are done, your friends may be wishing you did! Build your fibre intake up slowly so the micro biome has time to adjust. This will minimize gas and bloating. Read on to learn why fibre is so fabulous.

Benefits of Fibre

naturopathic services in guelph

  • Softens the stool
  • Bulks the stool
  • Traps and prevent re-circulation and promote removal cholesterol from the body
  • Helps regulate blood sugar as they slow the release of sugars (carbohydrates) into the blood stream
  • Feeds the microflora in your gastrointestinal tract
  • Balances the variety of microflora in the gastrointestinal tract
  • Help with weight management

How much?

While most North Americans get less than 5g of fibre a day, the actual recommended amount is up t0 35 g per day. Increase slowly so your micro biome can adjust. Good fibres promote good bacteria, so a slow increase will naturally help promote a healthy gut flora.

GOAL= 35g per day

 

2 Types of Carbohydrates

At a high level, carbohydrates can be separated into two basic groups based how easily and quickly they are digested. A motto I use in clinic with my patients is:

Slow carbs, not no carbs.”

  1. Simple carbohydrates: starch, simple sugars, and fructans. Simple carbohydrates are easily broken down and absorbed in the small intestine.
  2. Complex carbohydrates: cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, pectin and beta-glucans. Complex carbohydrates are resistant to digestion in the small intestine and once moved further down into the digestive tract into the large intestine will be fermentation by the bacteria located there.

7 Types of Fibre

  • hemicellulose
  • cellulose
  • lignins
  • oligosaccharides
  • pectins
  • gums
  • glucans

Where do you find these fibres?

Hemicellulose -An insoluble fibre found in whole grains. Increases bowel regularity and excretion of cholesterol.Includes:  arabinoxylan, glucans, galantines, xylans, mannans, and pontosans.

Cellulose: an insoluble fibre found in fruits, legumes, vegetables, nuts and seeds. Feeds the micro biome (gut flora) and byproduct is short chain fatty acids.

Lignins- an insoluble fibre found in root vegetables and berry seeds like flax and sesame. Helps feed and balance the natural micro biome.

Pectin is a soluble fibre found in apples, citrus fruits, legumes and nuts. Byproducts include butyrate and other short chain fatty acids. Helps balance the micro biome. Helps heal the gut and may have an effect on cholesterol.

Gums are thickening agents like xanthan, guar, Arabic, acacia, agar-agar, glucomannan and coboxymethyl cellulose. It creates short chain fatty acids in the gastrointestinal tract and promotes a healthy micro biome.

Glucans – Soluble fibre found in oats, barley and rye. Produces short chain fatty acids, stimulates healthy micro biome, reduces LDL cholesterol. Also soluble fibre found in mushrooms like reishi, shiitake, chug, maitake, and cremini. Byproducts include butyrate and other short chain fatty acids. Helps balance the micro biome. Medicinal mushrooms additionally help fight cancer, are antiviral, immuno-modulatory and help reduce inflammation.

Oligo(poly)saccharides: found in root vegetables, onions, garlic, asparagus, banana, chicory artichoke, lentils, beans and peas.  Studies show very helpful in helping you feel fuller longer and reduces intestinal inflammation. Note: FODMAPS (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) These short-chain carbohydrates are not well absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and can be easily fermented by gut bacteria producing pain, gas and bloating.

How can fibre help me loose weight?

Studies show that “increasing dietary fiber significantly reduces the risk of gaining weight and fat in women, independent of several potential confounders, including physical activity, and dietary fat intake.”

  1. As soluble fibre is fermented in the large intestine it produces hormones that tell our brain we are full.  (glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY))
  2. Dietary fibre has the ability to significantly decrease energy intake
  3. Dietary fibre takes energy to digest and therefore reduces the over all sum of caloric intake- digestive energy = energy provided.
References:
Lattimer JM, Haub MD. Effects of Dietary Fiber and Its Components on Metabolic Health. Nutrients. 2010;2(12):1266-1289. doi:10.3390/nu2121266
Tucker LA, Thomas KS. Increasing Total Fiber Intake reduces Risk of Weight and Fat Gains in Women. J Nutr. 2009 Mar;139(3):576-81. doi: 10.3945/jn.108.096685. Epub 2009 Jan 21.

 

Is Your Pooh Normal?

What does the state of your stool say about your health?

Our bodies are ultimately a manufacturing facility… food, nutrients absorbed and waste out. What our stool (medical term for pooh) tells us about the state of our bodies can be very informative. Take the Bristol Stool Chart, shown below, for example. The seven types of stool can tell us a lot about what’s going on. Lovely you say? Well, it can speak volumes to a naturopathic doctor on what to do to help you uhm.. move on… so to speak.

BristolStoolChart 

Get the SCOOP on your POOP!

If you are mostly a Type 3 or 4, way to go! You are likely getting enough water, fibre, eating a balanced diet and have a strong microflora (good bacteria in the gut). You likely have no underlying factors of disease affecting your intestinal tract.

Type 5? Likely need to pay attention to the right kinds of fibre, maybe some dietary tweaks, a proper probiotic and adequate fluid intake.

If you are Type 1 – 2 OR 6 – 7, then we need to get you more water and the right kinds of fibre and look for any neurological upset, food sensitivities, or medication side effects. Also to be considered are things like thyroid function, diabetes, calcium levels, dietary habits, supplement dosages, Celiac disease, bowel obstruction, endometriosis or even possibly cancer. Stress, depression and anxiety can also be a factor in alternating constipation and diarrhea.

As a naturopathic doctor we look to the root cause of the issue, remove anything that may get in the way of healing, and then look to what needs to be changed or added in order to restore the natural balance of the body, mind and spirit.

Dr. Laura M Brown, ND will find gentle ways to stimulate your healing within and restore your natural equilibrium.

Call now for an appointment at 519.826.7973

 

 

Top 10 February Healthy Heart Tips

A healthy lifestyle will make your heart healthier. Here are 10 things you can do to look after your heart.

Give up smoking

If you’re a smoker, quit. It’s the single best thing you can do for your heart health.

Smoking is one of the main causes of coronary heart disease. A year after giving up, your risk of a heart attack falls to about half that of a smoker.

You’re more likely to stop smoking for good if you use NHS stop smoking services. Visit the Smokefree website or ask your GP for help with quitting.

Get active

Getting – and staying – active can reduce your risk of developing heart disease. It can also be a great mood booster and stress buster.

Do 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every week. One way to achieve this target is by doing 30 minutes of activity on five days a week. Fit it in where you can, such as by cycling to work.

Manage your weight

Being overweight can increase your risk of heart disease. Stick to ahealthy, balanced diet low in fat and sugar, with plenty of fruit and vegetables, combined with regular physical activity.

Find out if you are a healthy weight with the BMI calculator. If you’re overweight, try our 12-week weight loss plan.

Eat more fibre

Eat plenty of fibre to help lower your risk of heart disease – aim for at least 30g a day. Eat fibre from a variety of sources, such as wholemeal bread, bran, oats and wholegrain cereals, potatoes with their skins on, and plenty of fruit and veg.

Cut down on saturated fat

Eating too many foods that are high in saturated fat can raise the level of cholesterol in your blood. This increases your risk of heart disease. Choose leaner cuts of meat and lower-fat dairy products like 1% fat milk over full-fat (or whole) milk.

Read the facts about fat.

Get your 5 A DAY

Eat at least five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables a day. They’re a good source of fibre, vitamins and minerals. There are lots of tasty ways to get your 5 A DAY, like adding chopped fruit to cereal or including vegetables in your pasta sauces and curries. Get more 5 A DAY fruit and veg tips.

Cut down on salt

To maintain healthy blood pressure, avoid using salt at the table and try adding less to your cooking. Once you get used to the taste of food without added salt, you can cut it out completely.

Watch out for high salt levels in ready-made foods. Most of the salt we eat is already in the foods we buy. Check the food labels – a food is high in salt if it has more than 1.5g salt (or 0.6g sodium) per 100g. Adults should eat less than 6g of salt a day in total – that’s about one teaspoon.

Eat fish

Eat fish at least twice a week, including a portion of oily fish. Fish such as mackerel, sardines, fresh tuna and salmon are a source of omega-3 fats, which can help protect against heart disease.

Pregnant or breastfeeding women shouldn’t have more than two portions of oily fish a week.

Drink less alcohol

Don’t forget alcohol contains calories. Regularly drinking more than the NHS recommends can have a noticeable impact on your waistline. Try to keep to the recommended daily alcohol limits to reduce the risk of serious problems with your health, including risks to your heart health.

Read the food label

When shopping, it’s a good idea to look at the label on food and drink packaging to see how many calories and how much fat, salt and sugar the product contains. Understanding what is in food and how it fits in with the rest of your diet.

Thanks to http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Healthyhearts/Pages/Healthy-heart-tips.aspx

5 Hidden Secrets of Weight Loss

When diet and exercise aren’t enough… you just can’t shake that extra weight. There may be hidden obstacles that need your attention before you can achieve your healthiest goals.

This Saturday, in a free public health forum, Dr. Laura Brown, ND will discuss ” The 5 Hidden Secrets to Weight Loss” at Guelph’s Goodness Me! Find out what may be the hidden reason for holding you back from your goals.

registernow

Saturday Oct 17th at 10-11:30am. Register Here

What do the following products have to do with weight loss?

Find out this and so much more this Saturday, October 17th at 10am at Goodness Me!

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