Dr. Laura: Dairy and hormone based cancers

There are mixed reviews on dairy consumption in hormone based cancers.  
Fortunate for Canadians, their milk supply is protected from added hormones, where the US supply is not. If you go for organic, is it better? Organic dairy is GMO-free which should technically then be free of hormone mimickers like organophosphate and glyphosate. Is this all we have to worry about?

Insulin growth factor


There’s more to the story of dairy and hormones. Insulin growth factor (IGF-1) is in all dairy products, naturally. Even natural organic milk will have it. IGF-1 both protects aging bones and has the potential to aggravate hormone based cancers. It seems that IGF-1 prevents cells from dying when they should and thus has the potential to promote the spread of existing breast cancer cells. From this we might conclude that less IGF-1 (less dairy) in the diet may reduce the spread of an existing hormone based cancer. Research continues.

“A 3 serving increase in milk consumption per day is associated with an 18.6% (95% CI= 0.9% to 39.3%) increase in free IGF-I levels.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3978780/



For breast cancer survivors research says to reduce dairy. At 1/2 c a day of yogurt, this may be enough to have reduced, but this is a decision you will have to make for yourself, given the facts we know and the ones we may not yet know.

What about the bones?

After estrogen deprivation therapies, the bones are often weakened. For protection, protein (about 1g per kg of body weight per day), weight bearing exercise as well as your mineral matrix is important.

Calcium supplementation should not exceed 500mg. Daily recommended intake of calcium is about 1200-1500mg per day. Many dairy alternatives like almond or cashew milk are supplemented with calcium. Food sources include canned salmon with the bones in it, sesame seeds, broccoli, dark leafy greens, chia seeds and molasses. Although spinach is high in calcium it not easily available as it is also high in oxalates that bind it.

Decisions about health are personal. We make the best decisions we can with the information we know at the time.

Here are some other related links you might like to check out:

Canada protects its milk supply from added hormones: https://albertamilk.com/ask-dairy-farmer/ive-started-buying-organic-milk-based-on-the-assum/

For GMO free: http://organicmeadow.com/ENGLISH-FAQ.htm

“IGF-I is an essential factor for longitudinal bone growth. IGF-I can also exert anabolic effects on bone mass during adulthood.” https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/99/5/1256S/4577510 

Effective inhibition of IGF signal transduction should be included in combinations of targeted drugs designed to treat metastatic oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancers.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4722749/

About the author:Dr. Laura M. Brown ND is a Naturopathic Doctor with a Functional Medicine approach. She is a Certified Gluten Practitioner, A HeartMath Certified Practitioner and is a graduate of Adapt Level 1 at Kresser Institute of Functional Medicine. Essentially, Dr. Brown helps people better digest their food and the word around them. More at www.naturalaura.caand  www.forwardhealth.ca

Dr. Phil Shares: 10 Reasons Why Weight Lifting Is Great for Women

10 Reasons Why Weight Lifting Is Great for Women

10 Benefits of Strength Training for Women

When you’re weight training, you shouldn’t rely exclusively on the scale to gauge your progress. You can use a body fat tester or a tape measure to track how many inches you’re losing.

The size of your body will shrink as you shed fat and build muscle, but your weight may not change as dramatically as you expect. Besides, what’s more important, the number on the scale or how you look in selfies?

If you’re still not convinced that you need to lift weights, here are 10 reasons you should reconsider.

1. Burn More Fat

Researchers at Tufts University found that when overweight women lifted heavy weights twice a week, they lost an average of 14.6 pounds of fat and gained 1.4 pounds of muscle.

The control group, women who dieted but didn’t lift weights, lost only 9.2 pounds of fat and gained no muscle.

When you do an intense weight-training program, your metabolism stays elevated and you continue to burn fat for several hours after working out. During regular cardio exercise, you stop burning fat shortly after the workout.

2. Change Your Body Shape

You may think your genes determine how you look. That’s not necessarily true. Weight training can slim you down, create new curves, and help avoid the “middle-age spread.”

So, no, you won’t bulk up — women don’t have enough muscle-building hormones to gain a lot of mass like men do. If you keep your diet clean and create a calorie deficit, you’ll burn fat.

3. Boost Your Metabolism

The less muscle you have, the slower your metabolism will be. As women age, they lose muscle at increasing rates, especially after the age of 40. When you diet without doing resistance training, up to 25 percent of the weight loss may be muscle loss.

Weight training while dieting can help you preserve and even rebuild muscle fibers. The more lean mass you have, the higher your metabolism will be and the more calories you’ll burn all day long.

4. Get Stronger and More Confident

Lifting weights increases functional fitness, which makes everyday tasks such as carrying children, lifting grocery bags, and picking up heavy suitcases much easier.

According to the Mayo Clinic, regular weight training can make you 50 percent stronger in 6 months. Being strong is also empowering. Not only does it improve your physical activities, it builds emotional strength by boosting self-esteem and confidence.

5. Build Strong Bones

It’s been well documented that women need to do weight-bearing exercise to build and maintain bone mass. Just as muscles get stronger and bigger with use, so do bones when they’re made to bear weight.

Stronger bones and increased muscle mass also lead to better flexibility and balance, which is especially important for women as they age.

6. Improve Mood

You’ve probably heard that cardio and low-impact exercises such as yoga help improve mood; weight lifting has the same effect. The endorphins that are released during aerobic activities are also present during resistance training.

7. Improve Sports Fitness

You don’t have to be an athlete to get the sports benefit of weight training. Improved muscle mass and strength will help you in all physical activities, whether it’s bicycling with the family, swimming, golfing, or skiing… whatever sport you enjoy.

8. Reduce Injuries 

Weightlifting improves joint stability and builds stronger ligaments and tendons. Training safely and with proper form can help decrease the likelihood of injuries in your daily life.

It can also improve physical function in people with arthritis. A study conducted at the University of Wales in Bangor, United Kingdom, found that mildly disabled participants who lifted weights for 12 weeks increased the frequency and intensity at which they could work, with less pain and increased range of movement.

9. Get Heart Healthy

More than 480,000 women die from cardiovascular disease each year, making it the number-one killer of women over the age of 25. Most people don’t realize that pumping iron can also keep your heart pumping.

Lifting weights increases your “good” (HDL) cholesterol and decreases your “bad” (LDL) cholesterol. It also lowers your blood pressure. The Journal of the American Medical Association reports that people who do 30 minutes of weight lifting each week have a 23 percent reduced risk of developing heart disease compared to those who don’t lift weights.

10. Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

In addition to keeping your ticker strong, weight training can improve glucose utilization (the way your body processes sugar) by as much as 23 percent.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 weeks of strength training can improve glucose metabolism in a way that is comparable to taking medication. The more lean mass you have, the more efficient your body is at removing glucose from the blood.

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph