Dr. Laura’s Veggie Wraps

Veggie Wraps: Easy Quick and Simple Lunch

 The collard greens make great wraps, warm or cold.

Ingredients:

Sprouted Mung beans, cooked according to package.

Quinoa, cooked according to package

2 tbsp olive oil.

Collard leaf greens

Cooking Quinoa:

Generally quinoa needs twice the amount of water to cook. You bring it to a boil without the lid, then turn it down to a simmer, add the olive oil, cover the pot and give it 15 min or so.

Quinoa is high in protein and, for most, very easy to digest. Gluten free quinoa grown in Canada is available at Costco and most local grocery stores.

Cooking Mung Beans:

Sprouted mung beans should be rinsed in a sieve with water, placed in the pot and then covered with three times the amount of water than beans. Bring them to a boil with out the lid, then turn down and let simmer for about 30 minutes. Drain and rinse again.

Mung beans are a cooler neutral food with a sweet flavour. Mung beans detoxify, improve digestion and alleviate inflammation in the body. They are also useful in the treatment of edema (swelling) of the lower extremities, high blood pressure, impatience and restlessness. I found sprouted mung beans by the Sasha Bread Co. at Longo’s in Guelph, and they are commonly available at most local grocery stores.

The quinoa and mung beans may be mixed, then placed into small jars like the one pictured above. these can be stored in the fridge for up to 3 days or frozen for up to a month. Easy to grab and go for lunch.

Collard Greens

Collard greens are a part of the cabbage family and therefore are helpful to detoxify. They help both phase I and II liver detoxification and provide a good source of fiber. It’s a dark leafy green so a good source of magnesium as well. Break off the end and eat it or tuck it up into the quinoa and mung bean mix and make your wrap. They can be eaten raw, or lightly steamed. To steam, rinse then place on a plate and put in microwave for 30 seconds.

Plastic Free Beeswax Wrap

I make wraps travel well in a beeswax dipped cotton cloth. It’s a bit sticky so it sticks when you fold it. Mine was a gift. I’ve seen them at Goodness Me! and Stone Store in Guelph, and also found a great recipe to make your own plastic free food wrap.

From the heart and kitchen of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Dr. Laura: Acupuncture- More than pain relief

Acupuncture releases natural painkillers, promotes blood flow, stimulates hormonal balance, relaxes tight muscles, calms anxiety, lifts depression, and promotes digestion.

This ancient Chinese therapy effects every major system of the body, including the cardiac, gastrointestinal, circulatory, cerebral, genitourinary, endocrine and immune systems.

Traditional Chinese medicine

Get to the point…

Some people explain acupuncture in terms of energy and meridians. While this is not wrong, it would be equally right to explain that the energy is based on nerve conduction and proper firing of the nervous system.

Each acupuncture point is a small area about 1cm in diameter. They are where groups of nerves meet below a small opening in the fascia. Needling these points, electronically stimulating or even applying vibrational therapy or direct pressure activates the points. This will help dissipate energy that has built up or, alternatively, stimulate the flow of energy to the area.

Did you catch that? Needles are only one way to stimulate the point. If you don’t like needles and wish to try a needle free way of stimulating the points, there are alternatives.

Acupuncture:

1. Relieves pain.

2. Reduces inflammation.

3. Brings balance in the body.

 

What’s in it for me?

Acupuncture is a drug free way to address:

  • TMJ/ jaw clenching
  • sciatica
  • blood pressure
  • anxiety
  • depression
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • inflammation
  • joint pain
  • acute injuries
  • frozen shoulder
  • PMS
  • bursitis
  • arthritis
  • fatigue
  • common cold
  • headache
  • sinusitis
  • insomnia
  • muscle tension
  • PCOS
  • tinnitus
  • ulcerative colitis
  • vertigo
  • weak immune system
  • fertility

Usually relief is found after the first 30 minute treatment. It typically takes 4-8 treatments to restore balance and heal the body. Sessions can be daily, biweekly, weekly. For maintenance, once a month.

Under Ontario regulation, Naturopathic Doctors are able to perform acupuncture. If claiming under your benefit plan, it will be considered as “naturopathic services”.

From the heart and desk of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Are you ready for an Emotional rEvolution?

Resolving to have more clarity of thought, speech and emotional composure?

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND, a Certified HeartMath Practitioner,

provides a 5 week stress reduction program that will revolutionize the way you experience life.

“Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is a simple phenomenon that has been known for many years. I find it so fascinating that every emotion has a signature heart rate variability. The very fact that we can learn to shift this with focus and practice is so very powerful.  Through a series of step-by-step layered techniques, any one can learn how to engage and increase their HRV.  I loved this so much I became a HeartMath Certified Practitioner so that I can now teach others the techniques.” – Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Imagine being able to turn a bad day around or recover more quickly from an aggravating piece of news or a heated discussion. 

Breakthrough research has found that we can intentionally change our emotional state to find inner balance, and a feeling of ease which increases our resilience and allows us to bounce back more quickly from daily stressors.

The emotional state of inner balance is marked by a smooth heart rhythm pattern, called a coherent waveform.

5 weeks and you will learn:

  • how to retain calmness even in the most difficult times
  •  the power to self-direct and manage response and behaviour
  • how move away from negative and destructive attitudes and behaviours
  • how to move towards more positive and regenerative emotions
  • what heart rate variability is and how it relates to modern diseases
  • how to build and maintain loving relationships
  • HeartMath techniques for achieving optimal performance at home, work & sport
Here is what some folks in the top schools and business have to say: 
 

The [HeartMath] program has been tremendously helpful to me. … creating what I believe will be lifelong changes in how I respond to stressful situations. I am already experiencing better sleep, fewer frustrations at work, and a greater reservoir of patience and appreciation for the present moment. – Freya A. Sommer, Stanford University

 

… it is great learning how to deal with my stress and reduce it to be more productive. I use it every night and I am sleeping great. ..I am very impressed with this program and I would recommend it to anyone. –Margaret Lawrence, Team Lead, Travelocity Business

 

“It’s becoming clear that emotions are the primary drivers of activity in the body’s major systems, including the autonomic nervous and hormonal systems.”
~ HeartMath Institute Director of Research Dr. Rollin McCraty

No extra equipment required. Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND will use the in-clinic emWave pro to monitor your physiological changes and provide live bio-feedback to monitor your progress.

Curious?

Watch a YouTube on The Heart’s Intuitive Intelligence: A path to personal, social and global coherence

I want to get started! 

(Book initial appointment if new to Dr. Laura or a follow up if you are an existing patient)

 

Science of the Heart

Certified HeartMath Practitioner and Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND explains how the heart and brain communicate and how the activity of the heart influences our perceptions, emotions, intuition and health.

How does the heart communicate?

Pulse

The pulse is measured in beats per minute. A normal adult resting heart rate is 60-90 beats per minute. The heart rate is slower in athletes, hypothyroidism, and when taking medications like a beta-blocker.

Pressure

Blood pressure. The top number is the systolic pressure, which is the force the blood pushes on the arteries as it squeezes through. Generally 120mmHg or less is considered healthy. The bottom number in your reading is the diastolic pressure. Diastolic pressure is the force the blood acts on the arteries when the heart is filling with blood. Around 80mmHg is a good number. A visit to your doctor will help you understand how often you should test and what your numbers mean if they are not around 120/80mmHg.

Electrical

Electrocardiogram or EKG measures the electrical impulse that causes the heart to pump blood.  Sometimes people get a pacemaker if the natural electrical system is not working properly.

Hormonal

The heart is hormonal. Two well known hormones are atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP).  ANF and BNP are activated by increased wall stretch due to increased volume and pressure overload – they rise sharply right after a heart attack and can be monitored as an indicator of cardiovascular disease.

Rhythm

Heart rate variability (HRV), or the beat to beat variation of the heart rhythms are the clearest indicator of one’s emotional states, level of stress and cognitive processes. It is also the most consistent measure of cardiovascular health.  The 1994 Framingham Heart Study identified increased Heart Rate Variability (HRV) as the only common factor that was found in all healthy individuals.

 

 

Want to learn more?

Free Seminar on the Science of the Heart

Wednesday February 22, 2017, 6:30-8pm

Goodness Me!

From the mind and heart of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

How Body and Emotional States Relate

Experience the State of Calm Energy

Can you really change your emotional experience by changing the expression on your face or the shape of your body? How does an actor cry on demand?

Is it possible that the very tools you need to bring yourself into a state of calm energy are with you where ever you go?

Emotions and physiology are undeniably linked. We see it when the blood pressure rises in anger, the heart beating rapid before we get on a stage, and muscle tension when we are holding mental anguish.

The ability of the nervous system to engage the metabolic resources in response to external pleasure or pain is crucial to our survival.

From such simple examples to complex paradigms, how can we deny the relationship between body, mind and also the spirit?

How do our body actions and energetic states relate?

emotions_picture

Do you find your shoulders constantly up around the ears, eyes squeezed and darting back and forth, thoughts circulating around being emotionally attacked? You are in a state of fear. Fear can often be paralyzing.

If you take a moment to observe your breath, is it shallow, do you maybe even feel light headed or dizzy from hyperventilating, are your muscles tender and sore from being tense? You are likely in the company of an old friend named anxiety.

Or can you sense your breath to and fro from the abdomen, your body relaxed without being slack, feeling alive without feeling stiff, consciously in touch with the many blessings in your life? You are in the blessed state of gratefulness.

Have you ever been wrapped up tight in a ball and feeling weak and small? Try making your body into the shape a very big star – stand tall, step one foot sideways,  a little wider than shoulder width apart. Reach the hands up and then out to the sides. Ideally you are making your body take up as much physical space as possible. Take a very big breath in and out, then let the breath naturally rise and fall and you look up to the sky – stay here for at least 90 seconds. Do you feel free and strong?

When you visit a naturopathic doctor, your health assessment is medically focused however your emotional, spiritual, cognitive, physical aspects are holistically considered. Learn more about the Physiology of Emotions with Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND on Thursday May 12th at Goodness Me! in Guelph (at the corner of Gordon and Wellington).

Find out  your one of a kind, individualized treatment plan to help bring the paradox of calm energy back into you life by booking an appointment with Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND at Forward Health in Guelph (at the corner of Gordon and Kortright) today.

 

4 Holiday Fitness Myths, Busted

Myth: Americans gain average of 5 pounds between Thanksgiving and January 1st
Fact: Most people don’t plump up during the holidays. The average weight gain is around 1.7 pounds, according to a study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Your move: Don’t obsess about what you eat, but do be strategic about it, says study author Jamie Cooper, Ph.D., an associate professor of food and nutrition at the University of Georgia. If you overindulge during Thanksgiving dinner, don’t sweat it—but also don’t gorge on leftovers for days afterward. Freeze extra food to eat in small portions during the next month or two. “Be careful about how and what you eat at holiday parties as well,” suggests Cooper. “If you’re going to a potluck, bring a healthy dish, because then you’ll know you have at least one nutritious option.” (Our suggestion: Roasted fennel and farro salad.)

Myth: You’re too busy to work out
Fact: “You’re not—especially during the holidays,” says Dale Wagner, Ph.D., an associate professor at Utah State University who studies holiday weight gain. Sure, high-calorie meals make you sluggish, and cold weather makes outdoor workouts unappealing. But if you’re cashing in extra PTO days in November and December, you probably have more hours than usual to sneak in a workout despite an increased demand to play Candy Land and watch The Grinch, says Wagner.
Your move: Get creative about burning calories. “Look at additional free time as an opportunity to do things that you normally wouldn’t do,” says Wagner, who suggests cross-country skiing or snowshoeing with family or friends instead of, say, sitting around the fire or television. Performed a moderate intensity, cross-country skiing torches as many calories as cross-country running (643 calories per hour on average for a 150 pound individual), while snowshoeing is similar to hiking (379 calories per hour on average).

Myth: If you’re already fit, you’re less likely to plump up
Fact: Being in shape doesn’t shield you from the effects of overindulgence and inactivity, according to a recent study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Yes, you have more “metabolically active tissue” (i.e., muscle) than most people. Yes, your metabolism operates in a higher gear if you work out regularly. No, those benefits don’t last long or protect you from a 3,000-calorie meal, like the average Thanksgiving dinner. “Generally, the benefits start to fade after a few days,” says study author Dale Schoeller, Ph.D., a professor emeritus of nutritional sciences at the University of Wisconsin. Stretch that out to two weeks, and your belly fat can rise by 7 percent, according to a meta-analysis in theJournal of Applied Physiology.
Your move: Stay focused. You don’t have to do the workouts you normally do, but do something (like the activities mentioned above). “And if you can, increase your step count to offset the caloric cost of indulgences,” says Schoeller. A brisk 30 minute walk can burn approximately 154 calories. An even better goal is to increase your total daily step count. Shoot for at least 7,500 steps a day, and do at least 3,000 of them at a cadence of 100 steps per minute, suggest researchers at the Walking Behavior Laboratory at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Myth: Whatever weight you gain, you’ll lose in the New Year
Fact: Odds are you won’t. Although most people only gain a pound or two during the holidays, the majority of them never lose it, according to scientists reporting in the New England Journal of Medicine. Not only do most people not follow through with their resolutions, but they also don’t curb their eating habits. Indeed, people tend to buy more calorie’s worth of food between January and March than during any other time in the year, according to a study by Cornell University. Why? Because while they buy more healthy foods, they don’t cut back on the unhealthy ones. “It’s called ‘cognitive bias’,” says study author David Just, Ph.D. “You pick up more veggies than you did last week, feel good about it, and reward yourself with a treat.” The result: A higher net caloric intake.
Your move: Treat grocery shopping like vacation packing: Make a list, determine what’s essential, and leave half the remaining items on the shelf. That should give you enough indulgences to satisfy your cravings without inflating your bottom line (just so we’re clear, that’s a bad thing in the context of weight loss). Also, keep your grocery lists stored on your phone so you can figure out which high-calorie foods you indulge in too often, says Just.

Shared by  Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health

Thanks to the Team at beachbody.com

Five Health Benefits of Standing Desks

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister

Spending more of your day standing could reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer

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There was a time when standing desks were a curiosity—used by eccentrics like Hemingway, Dickens and Kierkegaard, but seldom seen inside a regular office setting.

That’s changed, in large part due to research showing that the cumulative impact of sitting all day for years is associated with a range of health problems, from obesity to diabetes to cancer. Because the average office worker spends 5 hours and 41 minutes sitting each day at his or her desk, some describe the problem with a pithy new phrase that’s undeniably catchy, if somewhat exaggerated: “Sitting is the new smoking.”

Much of this research has been spurred by James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic. “The way we live now is to sit all day, occasionally punctuated by a walk from the parking lot to the office,” he recently said during a phone interview, speaking as he strolled around his living room. “The default has become to sit. We need the default to be standing.”

All this might sound suspiciously like the latest health fad, and nothing more. But a growing body of research—conducted both by Levine and other scientists—confirms that a sedentary lifestyle appears to be detrimental in the long-term.

The solution, they say, isn’t to sit for six hours at work and then head to the gym afterward, because evidence suggests that the negative effects of extended sitting can’t be countered by brief bouts of strenous exercise. The answer is incorporating standing, pacing and other forms of activity into your normal day—and standing at your desk for part of it is the easiest way of doing so. Here’s a list of some of the benefits scientists have found so far.

Reduced Risk of Obesity

Levine’s research began as an investigation into an age-old health question: why some people gain weight and others don’t. He and colleagues recruited a group of office workers who engaged in little routine exercise, put them all on an identical diet that contained about 1000 more calories than they’d been consuming previously and forbid them from changing their exercise habits. But despite the standardized diet and exercise regimens, some participants gained weight, while others stayed slim.

Eventually, using underwear stitched with sensors that measure every subtle movement, the researchers discovered the secret: the participants who weren’t gaining weight were up and walking around, on average, 2.25 more hours per day, even though all of them worked at (sitting) desks, and no one was going to the gym. “During all of our days, there are opportunities to move around substantially more,” Levine says, mentioning things as mundane as walking to a colleague’s office rather than emailing them, or taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

Failing to take advantage of these constant movement opportunities, it turns out, is closely associated with obesity. And research suggests that our conventional exercise strategy—sitting all day at work, then hitting the gym or going for a run—”makes scarcely more sense than the notion that you could counter a pack-a-day smoking habit by jogging,” as James Vlashos puts it in the New York Times. The key to reducing the risk of obesity is consistent, moderate levels of movement throughout the day.

Scientists are still investigating why this might be the case. The reduced amount of calories burned while sitting (a 2013 study found that standers burn, on average, 50 more calories per hour) is clearly involved, but there may also be metabolic changes at play, such as the body’s cells becoming less responsive to insulin, or sedentary muscles releasing lower levels of the enzyme lipoprotein lipase.

Of course, all this specifically points to danger of sitting too much, not exactly the same as the benefit of standing. But Levine believes the two are closely intertwined.

“Step one is get up. Step two is learn to get up more often. Step three is, once you’re up, move,” he says. “And what we’ve discovered is that once you’re up, you do tend to move.” Steps one and two, then, are the most important parts—and a desk that encourages you to stand at least some of the time is one of the most convenient means of doing so.

Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Other Metabolic Problems

The detrimental health impacts of sitting—and the benefits of standing—appear to go beyond simple obesity. Some of the same studies by Levine and others have found that sitting for extended periods of time is correlated with reduced effectiveness in regulating levels of glucose in the bloodstream, part of a condition known as metabolic syndrome that dramatically increases the chance of type 2 diabetes.

A 2008 study, for instance, found that people who sat for longer periods during their day had significantly higher levels of fasting blood glucose, indicating their their cells became less responsive to insulin, with the hormone failing to trigger the absorption of glucose from the blood. A 2013 study [PDF] came to similar findings, and arrived at the conclusion that for people already at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the amount of time spent sitting could be a more important risk factor than the amount of time spent vigorously exercising.

Reduced Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Scientific evidence that sitting is bad for the cardiovascular system goes all the way back to the 1950s, when British researchers compared rates of heart disease in London bus drivers (who sit) and bus conductors (who stand) and found that the former group experienced far more heart attacks and other problems than the latter.

Since, scientists have found that adults who spend two more hours per day sitting have a 125 percent increased risk of health problems related to cardiovascular disease, including chest pain and heart attacks. Other work has found that men who spend more than five hours per day sitting outside of work and get limited exercise were at twice the risk of heart failure as those who exercise often and sit fewer than two hours daily outside of the office. Even when the researchers controlled for the amount of exercise, excessive sitters were still 34 percent more likely to develop heart failure than those who were standing or moving.

Reduced Risk of Cancer

A handful of studies have suggested that extended periods of sitting can be linked with a higher risk of many forms of cancer. Breast and colon cancer appear to be most influenced by physical activity (or lack thereof): a 2011 study found that prolonged sitting could be responsible for as much as 49,000 cases of breast cancer and 43,000 cases of colon cancer annually in the U.S. But the same research found that significant amounts of lung cancer (37,200 cases), prostate cancer (30,600 cases), endometrial cancer (12,000 cases) and ovarian cancer (1,800 cases) could also be related to excessive sitting.

The underlying mechanism by which sitting increases cancer risk is still unclear, but scientists have found a number of biomarkers, such as C-reactive protein, that are present in higher levels in people who sit for long periods of time. These may be tied to the development of cancer.

Lower Long-Term Mortality Risk

Because of the reduced chance of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, a number of studies have found strong correlations between the amount of time a person spends sitting and his or her chance of dying within a given period of time.

A 2010 Australian study, for instance, found that for each extra hour participants spent sitting daily, their overall risk of dying during the study period (seven years) increased by 11 percent. A 2012 study found that if the average American reduced his or her sitting time to three hours per day, life expectancy would climb by two years.

These projects control for other factors such as diet and exercise—indicating that sitting, in isolation, can lead to a variety of health problems and increase the overall risk of death, even if you try to get exercise while you’re not sitting and eat a healthy diet. And though there are many situations besides the office in which we sit for extended periods (driving and watching TV, for instance, are at the top of the list), spending some of your time at work at a standing desk is one of the most direct solutions.

If you’re going to start doing so, most experts recommend splitting your time between standing and sitting, because standing all day can lead to back, knee or foot problems. The easiest ways of accomplishing this are either using a desk that can be raised upward or a tall chair that you can pull up to your desk when you do need to sit. It’s also important to ease into it, they say, by standing for just a few hours a day at first while your body becomes used to the strain, and move around a bit, by shifting your position, pacing, or even dancing as you work.

 

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/five-health-benefits-standing-desks-180950259/#6jGIujw8jDL7ydxe.99

Top 5 Drugs that Raise Blood Pressure

It’s more common that you might think! Over the counter and commonly prescribed drugs can increase your blood pressure. Be aware that when you have your blood pressure taken while these drugs are in your system, you may have a high reading.

  1. NSAIDS – non steroidal anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen, naproxen, Advil & Aleve.
  2. Alcohol- beer, wine, spirits.
  3. Corticosteroids – prednisone, hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone. Topical therapies may still affect blood pressure over a course of time, but to a much lesser effect: bethamethasone, hydrocortisone.
  4. Oral Contraceptive Pills- this is more of an adverse effect that only some people will experience.
  5. Decongestants like Sudafed (pseudoephederine)

If you are prescribed any one of these drugs for an existing medical condition, and your blood pressure is elevated, talk to your health care practitioner about alternatives before being prescribed a new or changed dose of blood pressure medication.

apple steth

There are natural alternatives to lowering blood pressure. I am happy to discuss these with you in your next visit.

Yours in Health,

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

7 Added Benefits For Adults In Guelph Who See A Chiropractor

Shared By kyphotic-spine-webDr. Phil McAllister, from Life Natural Health News

When most of us think about seeing our chiropractor, we think about getting help with back pain or some other kind of musculoskeletal problem. But did you know that chiropractic is also a great way to improve your general health and wellness?

The core concept of chiropractic is to restore the function of your nervous system so that it can do what’s it’s designed to do: keeping your body healthy and active. Chiropractic is truly about prevention. If you keep your nervous system working smoothly and without interference, many health issues become non-issues!

Don’t take our word for it, though. Over the last few years, there’s been a lot of scientific research that shows that chiropractic is good for much more than just aches and pains. Here’s a review of some of this literature.

1 – Boosts Immune Function

A 2010 study1 found that chiropractic adjustments actually boosted blood serum levels of some important natural antibodies in patients. The authors suggested that chiropractic adjustments might “prime” the immune system, making it easier to ward off infection and illness.

2 – Reduces Inflammation

Researchers in a 2011 study2 compared back pain patients to people with no pain and gave both groups chiropractic adjustments. The authors found that the back pain patients who received chiropractic care had dramatically lower levels of a key inflammatory cytokine, known as TNF-α. High levels of TNF-α have been linked to inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis.

3 – Chiropractic Reduces Blood Pressure

Hypertension is a huge public health issue in the US; it’s estimated that about 30% of adults suffer from this serious condition. A 2007 study3 in the Journal of Human Hypertension looked at a group of patients with high blood pressure. Half received received an adjustment of their atlas, and the other half received a sham adjustment.

The decrease in blood pressure was so dramatic in the patients who received real adjustments that the researchers wrote that it “is similar to that seen by giving two different anti-hypertensive agents simultaneously.” In fact, 85% of the study patients had improvement after just one adjustment!

4 – Reduces Stress

An interesting study by a team of Japanese researchers4 in 2011 gave chiropractic adjustments to 12 men and examined PET scan images and blood chemistry to examine the effect that chiropractic has on the autonomic nervous system.

After receiving a chiropractic neck adjustment, patients had altered brain activity in the parts of the brain responsible for pain processing and stress reactions. They also had significantly reduced cortisol levels, indicating decreased stress. Participants also reported lower pain scores and a better quality of life after treatment.

5 – Improves Balance

As we age, sometimes we start to lose some of our balance, strength, and flexibility that we had in our youth. Because of this, older folks are vulnerable to serious injuries from trips and falls. Chiropractic helps keep your body active by restoring the normal, healthy functioning of your spine. One of the important roles of your spine is balance, aided by nerves called proprioceptors. These propriocepters relay information to your brain on the position of your body.

A small study5 from 2009 found that people who received chiropractic adjustments had reduced dizziness and improved balance. A 2015 review of the literature6 suggests that chiropractic care might be an effective, natural way to help prevent falls in elderly patients.

6 – Relieves Colic in Babies

In 2012, researchers7 studied 104 infants who were suffering from colic. One-third of the infants were treated with chiropractic adjustments and the parents were aware of the treatment; one-third were treated and the parents were unaware of the treatment; and one-third were untreated but the parents were anaware.

The authors found that the parents reported a significant decrease in infant crying in the treated babies, compared to the infants who didn’t receive treatment. The knowledge of the parent had no effect on the improvement.

7 – Relieves Asthma Symptoms

A 2013 study8 reported that chiropractic adjustments were effective at increasing lung functioning, and some recent research9 shows that chiropractic care can help reduce the symptoms of asthma in some children.

 

To find a chiropractor in your community who can help you restore your health, use our handyChiropractor Search Directory.

Reference Studies

  1. Teodorczyk-Injeyan JA, McGregor M, Ruegg R, Injeyan HS. Interleukin 2-regulated in vitro antibody production following a single spinal manipulative treatment in normal subjects. Chiropractic & Osteopathy 2010;(18)26.
  2. Teodorczyk-Injeyan JA, Triano JJ, McGregor M, Woodhouse L, Injeyan HS. Elevated production of inflammatory mediators including nociceptive chemokines in patients with neck pain: a cross-sectional evaluation. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 2011;34(8):498-505.
  3. Bakris G, Dickholtz M Sr, Meyer PM, Kravitz G, Avery E, Miller M, Brown J, Woodfield C, Bell B. Atlas vertebra realignment and achievement of arterial pressure goal in hypertensive patients: a pilot study. Journal of Human Hypertension 2007;21(5):347-52.
  4. Ogura, Takeshi and Manabu Tashiro, Mehedi,Shoichi Watanuki, Katsuhiko Shibuya, Keiichiro Yamaguchi, Masatoshi Itoh, Hiroshi Fukuda, Kazuhiko Yanai. Cerebral metabolic changes in men after chiropractic spinal manipulation for neck pain. Alternative Therapies. 2011;17(6):12-17.
  5. Strunk RG, Hawk C. Effects of chiropractic care on dizziness, neck pain, and balance: a single-group, pre-experimental, feasibility study. Journal of Chiropractic Medicine 2009;8(4):156–164.
  6. Kendall JC, Hartvigsen J, French SD, Azari MF. Is there a role for neck manipulation in elderly falls prevention? – An overview. Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association 2015;9(1):53-63.
  7. Miller JE, Newell D, Bolton JE. Efficacy of chiropractic manual therapy on infant colic: a pragmatic single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 2012;35(8):600-7.
  8. Engel RM, Vemulpad SR, Beath K. Short-term effects of a course of manual therapy and exercise in people with moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a preliminary clinical trial. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 2013;36(8):490-6.
  9. Pepino VC, Ribeiro JD, Ribeiro MA, de Noronha M, Mezzacappa MA, Schivinski CI. Manual therapy for childhood respiratory disease: A systematic review. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 2013;36(1):57-65.