Dr. Laura: Can Fasting Heal Auto Immune Disease?

Fasting is known to initiate cellular clean-up, reduce inflammation, heal leaky gut and reset the immune system. What better formula could we ask for when it comes to autoimmune disease?

Can Fasting Really Help AutoImmune Suffering?

After a recent talk at Goodness Me! I did on the safety of fasting, I was left with more questions on how fasting could help those suffering with autoimmune conditions like multiple sclerosis, Sjogren’s, celiac, diabetes type I, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis.

In the interim I have played with intermittent fasting over the past couple of months and my body says “thank you!” My digestion has not been this good for years and the persistent scalp psoriasis has all but disappeared. Even when I eat tomatoes, a common trigger for me. It seems anacdotal, however fellow colleagues in the the functional medicine industry like Mark Hyman, Amy Myers, and Courtney Sperlazza all agree.

What Kind of Fasting?

There are many kinds of fasting. We fast when we exclude a single food or types of foods from our diet. So the 30-day reset with no grains, sugar or dairy is a type of fast. This is a good start. The Ketogenic diet is a type of fast too. A Keto diet for a while may be helpful because it switches the body from a carb burning engine to a fat burning engine. But here I am talking about intermittent and more extended fasts to give complete
digestive rest
. When the body is not busy digesting and sorting out where to use or store the blood sugar, it can focus on cellular clean up and repair. Of course when you do eat, nutrient dense foods are a must because you are eating less overall and will need to pack the nutrients you need into less meals. If you are sensitive to foods, like tomatoes, dairy, wheat and sugar for me, that doesn’t mean I go back to eating them all the time. If at all. My excuse was I was in beautiful Italy and learning to make a succulent Bolognese sauce.

Can Anyone Fast?

No. Fasting isn’t for everyone. Not for children or pregnant mothers, those who are malnourished or those with anorexia or bulimia – that’s just playing with fire. Fasting also has to be monitored if you are on medications or have certain medical conditions. Medical complications include gout, cardiac arrhythmia, and postural hypotension.

How Long to Fast?

There is nothing written in stone about the perfect length of fast. And if you ever feel nauseous, dizzy or unwell you should eat. This isn’t about starvation. It’s about digestive rest. It’s about resetting insulin sensitivity and the immune system. Also, we know where the food is and have access to it if we need it. So it’s not starvation.

What Foods are Allowed?

As I mentioned above there are no real rules and there are many different  types and lengths of fasts. If you are on the thinner side and can’t stand to loose some weight, then you better consider bone broth fasts, where there are some nutrients and fat going in. If you have a little loving around that waist line, you likely can feed off that for a while and have coffee, tea and of course LOTS OF WATER.

For more information on whether fasting is right for you, and how to do it, book an appointment with Dr. Laura M. Brown ND. 519.826.7973.

 

Dr. Laura: Cough and Cold Relief, Naturally.

Naturopathic medicine offers much in line with cough and cold relief. The common cold and sinusitis are classic respiratory tract illnesses.

Respiratory Tract

The respiratory tract can be affected by many different cold viruses which  cause coughs due to inflammation, pain, and irritating mucous. The typical respiratory virus lasts 7-10 days.

Prevention

  • wash hands
  • avoid cross contamination
  • strengthen immune

First line is prevention. Washing hands regularly with soap and water is key. Also keep unwashed hands away from common sites of viral and bacterial entry: the nose, eyes, ears and mouth. Medicinal mushrooms, herbal formulas geared to the immune system, garlic, vitamin C may all be used to help strengthen the immune system.

Early signs

At early signs of throat tickles or glandular reactions, there are homoepathics and essential oils, mineral and botanical sprays that can nip things before they take off. Wet socks can also be helpful to boost white blood cells.

Naturopathic Treatments for Cough and Cold

Relieve blocked sinuses

There are acupuncture points to help balance heat and cold in the body, as well as ones that activate and release the sinuses. Even a single treatment can provide significant relief. At home hydrotherapy is always useful. A nasal saline rinse, wet socks or steam inhalation can all help you breath and sleep better at night and breathe better through the day. Steam inhalation with essential oils of thyme, lavender or eucalyptus allows antimicrobials to come in direct contact with the respiratory tract mucosa and the heat will help loosen the mucous. Herbal remedies blended to suit the symptoms of the cold and cough are very helpful to reduce the severity and duration. They offer antimicrobial factors, reduce inflammation and soothe irritated tissues. Mucolytics are neutracueticals which help break up mucous. Dr. Laura will work with you to find the best combination of remedies for you.

Relieve cough

  • Herbal remedies to soothe and reduce inflammation of mucous membranes
  • Homeopathic remedies prescribed for the specific nature

As mentioned above, custom blended herbal and homeopathic remedies can reduce the intensity and duration of the respiratory virus. Often, in upper respiratory tract infections, it is the post nasal drip of mucous from the sinuses that produces the cough. In lower respiratory tract infections, there is also irritating mucous involved. In both cases, it is important to treat the mucous congestion as mentioned above and soothe the tissues.

Treat lingering cough

  • Nebulized Glutathione

Nebulized or inhaled glutathione may be helpful to nourish and restore respiratory tract tissue. It is useful in any trauma to respiratory tract including smoke and fume inhalation and treatment can reduce and even avoid the post viral cough. Glutathione offers antioxidant protection and immune support while avoiding influence on plasma levels.

Alterations in the levels of glutathione in the lung and alveoli are widely recognized in many inflammatory lung diseases. Glutathione in the lining fluid of the lower respiratory tract is the first line of defence against oxidative stress.

 

Dr. Laura M. Brown ND

 

References:

The treatment of pulmonary diseases and respiratory-related conditions with inhaled (nebulized or aerosolized) glutathione. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2007;5(1):27-35.

https://ndnr.com/bacterialviral-infections/post-viral-cough-clinical-considerations/

Dr. Phil Shares: Should You Work Out With a Cold?

Should You Work Out With a Cold?

When you’re feeling under the weather, does activity help or hinder?

Most experts agree you can still work out when you’re sick — as long as you listen to your body and not push it.

Keep in mind, everyone’s tolerance level for colds and sniffles varies — one person feels like they can sustain a normal workout routine, while another feels too draggy to even consider it.

“Studies show that exercise is beneficial because it can boost your immune system before, during and after sickness,” says Nicola Finely, M.D., integrative medicine specialist at Canyon Ranch in Tucson.

Note: If you have a chronic health condition, such as asthma, you may want to consult your doctor first before exerting yourself.

Does Exercise Boost the Immune System?

“Exercise allows your white blood cells to circulate faster throughout the body, and white blood cells are the immune warriors that fight off infections,” explains Finely.

The American College of Sports Medicine backs that up, too, stating that regular and moderate exercise lowers the risk for respiratory infections and that consistent exercise can enhance health and help prevent disease.

In one study in the American Journal of Medicine, women who walked for 30 minutes every day for a year had only half the number of colds as those who didn’t bust a move.

Working out almost daily at a moderate pace can help keep your immune system strong.

But overtraining and pushing yourself too hard for too long can decrease the levels of IgA, which are antibodies on the mucosal membranes, such as the respiratory tract. These antibodies are needed to battle bacteria and viruses.

According to The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), moderate physical activity done every day, such as yoga or jogging, is the most effective way to keep the immune system strong.

Should-You-Work-Out-With-a-Cold

Experts Recommend Exercising With a Cold If:

  •  You have a garden-variety cold but no fever. Exercise can help relieve you from stuffiness by opening up your nasal passages, says the Mayo Clinic.
  •  Your symptoms are above the neck like a runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing or a slight sore throat.

“Keep the intensity at a moderate-to-low pace,” cautions Finely.

For example, if you typically go for a 30-minute run every day, take a brisk walk instead. And if you start to feel worse with exercising, then you should stop, she says.

Skip Exercise With a Cold If:

  •  You have a fever, discomfort in your chest, or difficulty breathing.
  • Your symptoms are below the neck, such as chest congestion, a hacking cough or an upset stomach.
  • You’re tired, you’re running a fever, or you’re especially achy. “I’d suggest any patient refrain from exercise if fever is higher than 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit,” says Finely, who points out that a fever is considered any temperature over 100 F. Exercising during this time increases the risk of dehydration, and can worsen or lengthen the duration of your cold, she explains.

A 2014 study in the journal Sports Health found that fever can have harmful effects on muscular strength and endurance.

There’s no great advantage in tiring yourself out when you’re feeling ill. After all, you don’t want to risk making yourself sicker, and taking a few days off shouldn’t affect your overall performance. “When you get back to exercise, make sure to gradually increase your level as you begin to feel better,” Finely advises.

Exercising during a cold can be beneficial, but don’t push it.

Remember, it can help flush bacteria out of your lungs and airways and reduce your overall chances of getting a cold in the first place.

The important thing is to listen to your body.

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Dr. Phil Shares: 5 Quick + Easy Ways To Incorporate Wellness Into Your Week

With all of the go, go, go that comes with being a busy, working woman, sometimes our own health falls to the wayside. We get it, not everyone has the time to hit a two-hour Pilates class every day…we certainly don’t! We’re all about striking a balance here and figuring out simple ways to improve our health on the daily. Let’s keep it simple and dive right into our five quick and easy wellness tips to improve your week.

easy wellness tips

Increase Your Intake of Hydrating Foods

Every wellness article you read is going to tell you to drink your body weight in water, and you should! But just in case you’re not the best at guzzling gallons of water in one sitting, try snacking on it! Foods like cucumbers, watermelon, strawberries, tomatoes and zucchinis are about 95 percent water. Increase your intake of these tasty snacks and you’ll kill two birds with one stone. We also love mixing in a shot of this hydrating inner beauty boost into our water!

Micro-Dose Your Vitamin D

Set a timer on your phone, write it on your to-do list, do whatever you need to do to incorporate fresh air into your day. Before lunch each day, head outside for a 15-minute walk and soak up the sunshine. Fifteen minutes may not sound like much, but it’s enough to get your blood pumping and also shift your mindset. Pencil in a minimum of one walk per day, but if you can swing more, do it!

Eat Mindfully

So many of us (*guilty hand raised*) eat like it’s just something else to check off our to-do list. We often eat our lunch at our desk in front of a computer, or at home in front of the television. This often leads to overeating or mindless snacking! When it’s time to eat a meal, choose somewhere intentional to sit that doesn’t involve devices with screens. This will help you feel mindful as you eat, breathing between bites, and taking note of when your body is satisfied.

Try Dry Brushing

Never heard of dry brushing? It has a surprising number of benefits, including lymphatic system stimulation. The lymphatic system is responsible for collecting and transporting waste to the blood. Dry brushing can stimulate the lymphatic system as it stimulates and invigorates the skin. It helps with everything from improving the appearance of skin to supporting digestion. Try our favorite brush here

Do Bedtime Yoga

This is one of our favorite ways to end the day. You literally do yoga in your bed, what could be more relaxing? We follow this routine, but feel free to find one that you look forward to doing each night!

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Rick Shares: “The Difference Between Deep Tissue Massage and a Firm Pressure Massage”

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE AND A FIRM PRESSURE MASSAGE?

There is often a misconception by clients that “firm pressure” is the same as “deep tissue massage.” To help clear up the confusion, we’d like to give you a clear explanation of what true deep tissue massage is and how its purpose is quite different than that of a Swedish-style massage delivered with firm pressure.To understand this difference, it’s helpful to first think of the body’s fascia and muscles in layers. Notice in this image the many overlappingMuscle layers layers of these tissues. Fascia is a connective tissue which permeates the entire body – literally holding the body together, wrapping around every muscle, nerve, organ, blood vessel, and bone. These wrappings are all interconnected in a three-dimensional maze. The muscle layers run superficial to deep in the body.

Learn about the growing interest in fascia

The significant difference in the two approaches is their effect on these layers. A Swedish technique uses lubricant to glide over the layers – whether that be on a superficial layer (light pressure) or a deeper layer (firm pressure). There may also be kneading of the muscles, vibration or percussion to stimulate the muscles, and passive and/or active joint movements. All of these techniques serve to increase circulation of blood and lymph, soften and relax the tissues, reduce cortisol levels in the body (the stress hormone), and provide a generalized sense of relaxation for the client.

Deep tissue technique uses very little to no lubricant so that the muscles can be hooked or grabbed, thereby stretching and lengthening them, and to separate adhered muscle compartments. Strokes will be considerably slower and possibly shorter as the therapist waits for a slow release of tension. Some areas may be skipped so more time can be spent on specific areas of need. Doing this provides better alignment of the muscles and less restriction in the joints, thereby improving their movement and function. It is a massage in which the primary goal is less about general relaxation and more about promoting change in the actual structure of the body.

Does Deep Tissue massage have to be painful to be effective?

Some believe that Deep Tissue Massage means that the therapist pushes as hard as possible with their elbow into the client’s muscles. The more it hurts, the more effective the work.

This is not only an inaccurate and potentially harmful picture of this type of therapy, but such misguided practices can bruise muscles, elicit a defensive reaction in a client’s body, and worsen pain cycles. Properly executed deep tissue work should not cause the client to grit their teeth in agony as the therapist coerces the body into submission! If you find yourself clenching, shortening or holding your breath, or gritting your teeth, then it’s TOO DEEP. Even when it gets intense, it should not go above about a 7 on the pain scale: enough to “hurt so good,” but not enough that you want to leap off the table (and never come back).

So What Should Deep Tissue Massage Feel Like?

By working with the layers – softening the superficial layers first and moving slowly into the deeper layers – deep tissue massage can allow the client’s body to deeply relax.

The therapist may utilize some Swedish techniques to warm up the tissues (kneading, friction, percussion), softening the superficial layers so that he or she can access the deeper ones more easily. Then, with little or no lotion, the therapist utilizes the hard surfaces of their hands and arms — surfaces such as fingers, knuckles, forearms, and elbows — and employs a very slow, sustained type of stroke.

With no lotion or oil to cause sliding, it becomes possible to fully get a hold of the shortened fascia; this is necessary in order to lengthen it. Slow, sustained strokes are what can change this tissue from a short, hardened state to a lengthened, fluid state. The process is not unlike stretching salt water taffy. You’ve got to get a hold of it, warm it up, and work it very slowly. The work may sometimes be intense, eliciting moderate discomfort as old adhesions and chronic dysfunctional patterns are altered. But that leads to a much more fluid, easy sense in the body.

How Do I Know Which One to Choose?

There is not necessarily a hard line between these two techniques, and many sessions often incorporate both depending on your needs. It is usually the case that not all the muscles in your body need deep tissue techniques applied. Rather than being overly concerned with choosing the “right” session, make sure you communicate to your therapist the goals for your session so that he or she can customize the right blend of techniques for you. One massage style is often the foundation of the session, with other techniques used as needed. Due to the slow pace of deep tissue massage it is necessary to schedule a 90-minute session if you would like your full body addressed. Use these guidelines for communication based on your primary goal for the session:

If your goal is to relax, reduce stress, and have a full body massage with firm pressure, a Swedish massage would be the best foundation.

If your goal is to have all of the above, but with some focused “fix-it” work on some of those minor nagging spots, a 50/50 massage is right for you, where deep tissue techniques will be used only where needed.

If you have an area of chronic or acute pain and limited mobility that needs focused work; if you are recovering from an athletic event and have a specific group of muscles needing attention, a Deep Tissue massage would be right for you to free those tight, sticky tissues.

Tips For After the Session

After the session and sometimes into the next day you may feel some tenderness or mild soreness. Your therapist might suggest ice or heat for pain relief and/or some gentle stretching.

Epsom salt bath: Although there is not much in the way of scientific evidence to prove the efficacy of an Epsom salt bath for reducing muscle soreness, plenty of people report that their aches and pains are alleviated significantly after a good salt soak. Pour 1 cup of epsom salt and 1 cup of baking soda into a warm bath and soak to your heart’s content.

Avoid strenuous activity for 24 hours, but a mellow walk may help to adjust your body to the changes in the tissue and joints. The result of a good deep tissue massage is often significant pain relief, greater freedom of movement, and a more fluid sense of balance in the body.

Stay hydrated and get a good night’s rest!

Communication is Key

A skilled therapist will tailor your session exactly as you need it based on your needs. As in all bodywork, the key to a gratifying experience is largely a function of good communication and clarification of objectives. We promise, we WANT you to speak up if there is anything we can do to make your session more comfortable so that you have a positive experience.

The Back Squat: Tips from Dr. Kyle

Advanced Squatting Technique

 

 

The back squat is one of the most popular and important exercises in the development of lower body strength. Maximal back squat performance shows strong correlations with improved athletic ability.

Although this is one of the most common exercises in strength and conditioning programs there is still variation in coaching styles for the classic back squat. Over the last decade there has been an ongoing debate over what techniques produce the best back squat.

So what does the evidence show?

First I must point out that techniques that work for some people may not work for everyone. Each individual has slight variations in the structure of their hips. Some people are born with more shallow hip joints while others present with a much deeper ball and socket structure.

Contrary to popular belief, the back squat does not produce excessive strain on the ACL. As squat depth and knee flexion increases, the force through the ACL increases as well. However, there is significantly less shearing force on the ACL during the squat as compared to open chain exercises such as knee extensions.

What about depth?

As knee flexion increases, so do the forces on the patella-femoral joint and tibio-femoral joint. Training in a progressive-overload fashion and allowing proper time for recovery will help avoid injury to the quadriceps tendon.

Deeper squats have been reported to result in greater jump performance in controlled trials. A combination of both deep and shallow squats (of greater intensity) demonstrated the greatest improvement in 1 rep max strength in a recent study.

Should the knees go beyond the toes?

Current research shows that when the knees pass beyond the toes while squatting there is an increase in anterior displacement of the tibia in relation to the femur. This may lead to a greater risk of sprain or strain in the knee. Research also showed that when the squat was restricted (knees did not pass beyond the toes) there was a noticeable increase in the shearing forces in the low back. Therefore it is not recommended to restrict the knees from going beyond the toes in and effort to reduce knee strain, as this will disproportionately increase the shearing forces in the lumbar spine.

What is the ideal trunk position?

Positioning of the trunk is directly related to the range of dorsiflexion in the ankle. When the range of motion in the ankle is restricted, the body tends to lean forward during the descent phase of the squat. When full range of motion is achieved in the ankles, the knees can shift forward and the torso remains more upright. Stretching and soft tissue therapy of the posterior calf muscles prior to squat training will therefore improve ankle mobility and prevent excessive forward lean.

Where should I be looking?

Downward gaze while squatting is associated with a greater forward lean. Maintaining a more upward gaze will keep the torso upright and prevent excessive shearing forces in the low back.

Last but not least: Foot position

Foot position will be slightly different for each lifter. A “natural” foot placement is recommended. This means roughly shoulder width apart with the toes pointing slightly outward. As mentioned before, everyone has different anatomical structure of the hips, ankles and knees. Foot placement will therefore be dependent on the natural rotation of the hips.

So what is the optimal back squat technique?

• Heels remain in contact with the floor
• Gaze forwards and upwards
• Natural stance width and foot positioning
• Full depth (115-125 degrees)
• Knees tracking over toes
• Chest up, relatively upright posture, neutral spine

As always, these are just recommendations and each individual should use precaution when beginning a new exercise. Please refer to a qualified strength and conditioning coach or a licensed health care professional for a complete movement assessment. Call 519-826-7973 or visit www.forwardhealth.ca to set up an appointment with Dr. Kyle today!

Visit https://www.facebook.com/drkylearam/ for video demonstrations and more!

Dr. Phil Shares: 8 Great Things About Exercising at Lunch

8 Great Things About Exercising at Lunch

Between work, social obligations and general life responsibilities, it can be difficult to fit everything into one day. That often leads to healthy activities like working out being relegated to extracurricular status and never becoming part of your routine.

Given all that, squeezing in a lunchtime workout might seem impossible. And yet … below we’ve got eight reasons to do exactly that. Once you start reaping the physical and mental benefits of midday exercise, you might never go back.

1
IT WILL DE-STRESS YOUR DAY

Nothing wards off stress quicker than a good sweat session. Per Harvard Medical School, exercise “has a unique capacity to exhilarate and relax, to provide stimulation and calm, to counter depression and dissipate stress.” It’s been successfully used to treat anxiety disorders and even clinical depression, so it can help you cope with a day full of meetings or that big presentation.

2
YOUR WORKOUTS WILL BE MORE EFFICIENT

If you’ve got nowhere to be, it’s easy to move slowly through a workout, taking time to check your phone, scroll through your playlist or just sit and relax on a weight bench. But when you’re due back in the office, you’ve got extra incentive to make the most of your time. And fortunately, between cardio, weight circuits and HIIT classes, you don’t need more than 30–40 minutes to get in a great workout.

3
YOU’LL UNDO DESK-RELATED DAMAGE

It’s just not healthy to sit all day. Over the years, studies have shown sedentary behavior is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, heart disease and poor circulation. In fact, research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed a 61% increase in mortality rates in those who sit and watch TV for seven hours or more per day. So getting up from your desk to stretch or walk around is a great start. Getting up from your desk to exercise for 30–45 minutes is even better.

4
IT FREES UP YOUR EVENINGS

If you’re tired of choosing between the gym and dinner with friends, well, now you won’t have to. Exercise during lunch and your night will be free to spend as you please, without the guilt of knowing you’ve missed yet another workout.

5
YOU’LL BEAT THE CROWDS

Sure, this article could cause everyone to make a mad dash to the gym. But the reality is that, on weekdays, most people work out in the morning or in the evening. That leaves the gym less crowded for lunchtime exercisers like you, so you can nab a coveted bike in that popular spin class or knock out a quick gym session without waiting on machines.

6
YOU’LL MAKE BETTER FOOD CHOICES

Even though you may feel hungry after working out, studies show exercise can help to regulate appetite and even promote satiety. It does this by releasing hormones that help the body better recognize when it’s full. So if you work out during the day, you’re not only getting the healthy benefits of exercise, but you’re more likely to make smart choices at lunch and dinner.

7
YOU’LL FEEL MORE ENERGIZED

A good workout gets the endorphins flowing, and endorphins contribute to that feeling of euphoria, often referred to as a “runner’s high.” That good feeling doesn’t stop the second you stop moving. Instead, the increased heart rate and blood flow can be accompanied by improved mood and energy for several hours after a workout, which means you’ll have the energy you need to tackle the rest of your afternoon.

8
IT’LL BOOST YOUR PRODUCTIVITY

In addition to improving your physical energy, exercise can also increase mental alertness and creative thinking. According to British researchers, workers who spent 30–60 minutes exercising at lunch reported an average performance boost of 15%. And 60% of workers saw improved time management skills, mental performance and ability to meet deadlines on days they exercised.

With all those reasons to work out during lunch, you might as well give it a try. And if your boss gives you a hard time about leaving in the middle of the day, just say (diplomatically) that you’re exercising because you care about your job and want to perform at your best.

 

by Kevin Gray

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Dr. Phil Shares: 10 Keto Recipes to Satisfy Your Cravings

Livin’ La Keto Loca

Creative cooking for the keto lifestyle

When it comes to a ketogenic diet, it’s no surprise that many of your favorite foods are off limits (e.g., sugary treats, carb-filled breads and pastas, etc.). And for most people, that’s enough of a deterrent to stay away from keto altogether. Don’t write it off just yet—you can enjoy delicious savory and even sweet foods even when following the strict keto macronutrient profile. These amazing recipes will prove it.

Egg-citing Breakfasts

Delicious Dinners

Savory Snacks

California Sunrise Bowl
Blueberry Scones
Ketolicious Chicken Empañadas
Fat Pizza
La Keto Loca Quesadillas
Bacon-Wrapped Asparagus
Cheesy Chicken Casserole
Taco ’Bout It Keto Skillet
Jalapeño Parm Crisps
Keto-Style Pigs in a Blanket

 

Egg-citing Breakfasts

California Sunrise Bowl

Makes 1 Serving

INGREDIENTS:
  • 2 large eggs
  • ½ link chorizo sausage (4″ long)
  • ½ ripe California avocado
  • 2 Tbsp. sour cream
  • ¼ cup cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 2 Tbsp. salsa
  • ⅛ cup cilantro

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Cook chorizo over medium-high heat in a skillet.
  2. Place chorizo on a paper towel and pour out some of the grease, setting some aside for the eggs.
  3. In a skillet over medium heat, add leftover chorizo grease, then break in eggs and scramble. For extra fluffiness, add milk (optional). Once cooked, add eggs to the bottom of a bowl.
  4. Top eggs with chorizo and layer on avocado, cheese, tomato, sour cream, and cilantro.
    Serve warm and enjoy!
Per Serving: 530 calories, 13 g carbs, 43 g fat, 26 g protein

 

Blueberry Scones

Makes 12 Servings

INGREDIENTS:
  • 2 cups almond flour
  • ¼ tsp. stevia
  • ¼ cup coconut flour
  • 1 Tbsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 Tbsp. coconut oil
  • ¼ cup heavy whipping cream
  • ½ tsp. vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup fresh blueberries

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together almond flour, stevia, coconut flour, baking powder, and salt.
  3. Stir in eggs, whipping cream, oil, and vanilla and mix until a dough forms. Add blueberries; carefully mix through.
  4. On the baking sheet, pat dough into a rectangle, about 10” x 8” in size.
  5. Cut dough into 6 squares, then cut each square diagonally to form two triangles. Gently lift scones and distribute them around the pan.
  6. Bake 20 to 25 minutes, until golden brown and slightly firm. Remove and allow to cool. Serve and enjoy!
Per Serving: 150 calories, 6 g carbs, 12 g fat, 5 g protein

Delicious Dinners

Ketolicious Chicken Empañadas

Makes 3 Servings

INGREDIENTS:
Crust:
  • 1 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • ½ cup almond flour
  • 1 oz. cream cheese
  • 1 large egg

Filling:

  • 6 oz. ground chicken
  • 1¼ tsp. Metagenics MCT oil
  • Salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS:
Crust:

  1. Cut cream cheese into 4-5 pieces and add to a bowl along with mozzarella cheese. Microwave for 30 seconds. Stir, then microwave for another 30 seconds. While cheese is still hot, mix in almond flour. Add egg and mix well.
  2. On a nonstick sheet, roll out dough into a flat circle.
  3. Using a cookie cutter, create 6-8 circles, approximately 5″ in diameter.

Filling:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Place dough circles onto a nonstick baking pan. Layer filling on one side of the circle.
  2. Fold and press down the edges, creating a half-moon shape.
  3. Bake for 18-20 minutes, until puffed and golden brown. Serve and enjoy!
Per Serving: 370 calories, 4 g carbs, 27 g fat, 26 g protein

 

Fat Pizza

Makes 4 Servings

INGREDIENTS:
Crust:
  • 4 large eggs
  • 6 oz. shredded mozzarella cheese
  • ½ cup almond flour
  • ½ Tbsp. psyllium husk powder

Topping:

  • 3 Tbsp. tomato paste
  • 1 tsp. dried oregano
  • 5 oz. shredded cheese
  • 1½ oz. pepperoni

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. For crust, melt cheese in a bowl and add eggs to combine. Add flour and husk powder to mixture and knead dough into a ball.
  2. Apply some olive oil to the bottom of the baking pan to keep from sticking. Flatten the ball of dough directly over oil, then bake for 10-15 minutes or until golden. Remove and allow to cool.
  3. Increase oven temperature to 450°. Spread tomato paste on crust and sprinkle oregano on top. Top with cheese and pepperoni.
  4. Bake for another 5-10 minutes or until golden brown. Serve and enjoy!
Per Serving: 355 calories, 8.4 g carbs, 26 g fat, 23 g protein

 

La Keto Loca Quesadillas

Makes 3 Servings

INGREDIENTS:
Low-Carb Tortillas:
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 large egg whites
  • 6 oz. cream cheese
  • 1½ tsp. ground psyllium husk powder
  • 1 Tbsp. almond flour
  • ½ tsp. salt

Filling:

  • 5 oz. shredded Mexican cheese
  • 1 oz. spinach
  • 1 Tbsp. avocado oil

DIRECTIONS:
Tortillas:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Beat eggs and egg whites together until fluffy, then add cream cheese and continue to beat until smooth.
  2. Combine salt, psyllium husk powder, and almond flour in a small bowl and mix well. Beat flour mixture into batter until combined; ensure batter is thick and allow to rest. (If needed, add more husk powder to increase thickness.)
  3. Using a spatula, spread batter over parchment paper-lined baking sheet and bake 5-7 minutes until edges brown, then cut into pieces; alternatively, you may fry batter in rounds on the stove.

Quesadillas:

  1. Heat oil (or butter) in a small, non-stick skillet. Add tortilla to pan, top with a handful of spinach and sprinkle with cheese, then fold in half; fry for a couple minutes on eat side until cheese is melted. Alternatively, you may leave tortilla open and add a second tortilla on top to close. Serve warm and enjoy!
Per Serving: 410 calories, 6 g carbs, 36 g fat, 17 g protein

 

Bacon-Wrapped Asparagus

Makes 4 Servings

INGREDIENTS:
  • 16 slices bacon
  • 16 medium spears asparagus
  • 1 tsp. garlic powder
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. pepper

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Wrap each slice of bacon tightly around each asparagus spear, then season with garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Bake for 15 minutes.
  2. Use tongs to turn each piece around, then bake for an additional 10-15 minutes until bacon is crispy. Serve and enjoy!
Per Serving: 233 calories, 5 g carbs, 16 g fat, 18 g protein

 

Cheesy Chicken Casserole

Makes 4 Servings

INGREDIENTS:
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 Tbsp. green pesto
  • ½ lemon juice
  • 1½ lb. chicken breasts
  • 7 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 lb. cauliflower
  • 1 leek
  • 4 oz. cherry tomatoes
  • 7 oz. shredded cheese
  • Salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Mix cream with pesto and lemon juice. Salt and pepper to taste.
  2. Season chicken breasts with salt and pepper and fry in oil until golden brown.
  3. Place chicken in a greased 9” x 13” baking dish, then pour in cream mixture.
  4. Chop leek, cherry tomatoes, and cauliflower into small florets and add to dish to top chicken.
  5. Sprinkle cheese on top and bake for at least 30 minutes or until chicken is fully cooked. Serve and enjoy!
Per Serving: 355 calories, 11 g carbs, 25 g fat, 29 g protein

 

Taco ’Bout It Keto Skillet

Makes 4 Servings

INGREDIENTS:
  • 1 Tbsp. avocado oil
  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • ½ medium white onion, diced
  • ½ large bell pepper, diced
  • 1 can green chilies
  • 3 Tbsp. taco seasoning
  • 2 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • 12 oz. cauliflower rice
  • 4 sprigs cilantro
  • 1 cup shredded Mexican blend cheese

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Heat oil in a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat, then add in beef and stir occasionally with a wooden spoon until brown.
  2. Add in onion, bell pepper, and taco seasoning and for cook 3 more minutes.
  3. Stir in green chilies and tomatoes along with cauliflower rice. Cook 5-7 minutes until moisture is gone.
  4. Sprinkle with cheese and cover until melted, about 2 minutes. Add toppings of choice (avocado, sour cream, cilantro, or jalapeno), serve, and enjoy!
Per Serving: 376 calories, 12 g carbs, 21 g fat, 33 g protein

Savory Snacks

Jalapeño Parm Crisps

Makes 2 Servings

INGREDIENTS:
  • 8 Tbsp. Parmesan cheese, grated
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 2 slices sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 medium jalapeño

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 425°. On a baking mat or parchment paper, create 8 mounds of Parmesan cheese, 1 Tbsp. each spaced 1” apart.
  2. Slice jalapeño thinly, then lay on a baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes; remove and allow to cool.
  3. Once cooled, lay a jalapeño slice on top of each mound of Parmesan, pressing down slightly.
  4. Split both cheddar slices into 4 pieces (8 total) and lay each piece on top of the jalapeño and Parmesan.
  5. Bake for 9 minutes. Serve warm and enjoy!
Per Serving: 200 calories, 4 g carbs, 15 g fat, 13 g protein

 

Keto-Style Pigs in a Blanket

Makes 4 Servings

INGREDIENTS:
  • 4 medium hot dogs
  • ½ cup mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • 1 Tbsp. cream cheese
  • ¾ cup almond flour
  • 1 large egg
  • ¼ tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. sesame seeds

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Cut each hot dog into 3 equal-sized pieces; set aside.
  2. Melt mozzarella in microwave and combine with almond flour and egg.
  3. Add baking powder, garlic powder, and salt to the mixture; mix well.
  4. Form dough in hands, split into 12 pieces, and roll pieces into balls.
  5. Place dough balls onto a parchment-lined baking sheet. Press each ball flat into an oval shape.
  6. Wrap each piece of hot dog in the pieces of dough. Sprinkle outside with sesame seeds, pressing down to stick.
  7. Bake for 17-20 minutes. Serve warm and enjoy!
Per Serving: 330 calories, 5 g carbs, 28 g fat, 15 g protein

 

Thanks for sharing Metagenics: Ketogenic

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Rick’s Tourtière Recipe!

This traditional French-Canadian dish is a crowd pleaser for the Holidays!

Ingredients:

1 lb Lean Ground Beef
1 lb Maple Leaf Ground Sausage
1/2 Cup Shredded Cheddar Cheese (Sharp)
1/2 Cup Chopped Onion
1 Egg Beaten
1 tsp Salt
¼ tsp Pepper
½ tsp Poultry Spice
½ tsp Sage
½ tsp Garlic
2 Frozen Pie Crusts (or make your favorite pastry recipe)

Instructions:

  • Cook ground beef and sausage until meat is thoroughly cooked (no pink) ensuring that the beef and sausage is mixed together.
  • Drain meat and place in a mixing bowl.
  • Sauté chopped onion and add it to the meat mixture.
  • Stir in spices and 1 beaten egg.
  • Line deep dish pie plate with pastry and spoon in meat mixture.
  • Cover with the top crust.
  • Brush the top crust with milk and cut vents.
  • Bake the pie for 50 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • If the edges of the crust begin to brown too quickly they can be covered with tin foil.

Dr. Phil Shares: 10 of the Best (and Worst) Workout Buddy Types

10 of the Best (and Worst) Workout Buddy Types

rward… but there are more soulmates in your life than just your spouse.

There’s your work husband/wife — that person in your office whom you tell everything. Then you have your book club bestie who loves the same characters and hates the same novels you do. And of course, your workout buddy — the one who keeps you on track with your meal preps and daily sweat sessions.

“When figuring out who your workout buddy is going to be for Double Time, choose someone you care about,” says Tony Horton. “You can choose a friend, a co-worker, or a family member. Double Time is also a great way to promote an active lifestyle for your family and have some fun bonding time with your kids.”

You’ll be spending a lot of time with your workout buddy, so it’s best to choose wisely. There are certain qualities that your buddy should possess—and a few you want to avoid at all cost. Here’s a guide to the different workout buddies you’ll encounter, and the best attributes of a true swolemate.

1. The Cardio Fanatic

“Wanna spin? Kickbox? Dance? Maybe go for a run?”

She’s always up for an energizing class — it doesn’t matter what it is as long as it gets the heart pumping and the sweat pouring. It’s beyond motivating to be moving and grooving next to this Energizer bunny — if your spirits are sagging, he’ll keep you going.

2. The Debbie Downer

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Studies actually show that social interaction plays an important role in your interest in an activity, even beyond experience of the activity itself. So make sure you not only find an activity you like, but a partner you favor, too.

3. The Constant Chatter Box

Trying to maintain a conversation while you’re lifting weights or powering through a cardio routine is no easy task. You don’t want to be rude and ignore the Chatty Cathy, but forcing yourself to respond can prevent you from getting the most out of your workout.

In fact, an inner dialog can be more helpful to your workouts than having someone else talk your ear off. This tactic, called “self-talk,” is useful for both motivational (i.e., mastery and drive) and cognitive (i.e., skill-specific and general) purposes, according to a study in the Journal of Psychological Sport and Exercise. So don’t let someone else’s talk get in the way of crushing your PR.

4. The Friendly Competitor

It doesn’t hurt if your workout partner is a bit competitive. A study of head-to-head cycling competition showed that it encourages participants to increase their performance. Having some friendly competition in the weight room or on the track will push you to be better than you thought you could be on your own.

5. The Flake

You make plans to go running at 7 a.m., but it’s 15 minutes past the hour and they’re still fast asleep. If only you had a dollar for every time The Flake has stood you up. It’s important to recognize these people for what they are — enthusiastic, fun friends who, when they do show up, add a lot to your workout. But they’re not people you can count on. So invite them to join, as long as you have someone else whom you can really rely on to be your workout buddy for the day.

6. The Muscle Head

He knows the best pre-workout supplements to improve your performance. She can tell you the difference between your gluteus maximus and your adductor longus — and which exercises work each. This buddy is a terrific partner, but only if you’re willing to put up with all the technical jargon.

7. The Drama Queen

There’s always something wrong with this workout buddy — the room is too warm or it’s too drafty. The machines are too old and broken down or they’re too new and complicated. No matter how hard you try to appease The Drama Queen, something will always be off. This will inevitably delay the act of working out for who knows how long, so it’s probably best to ditch this brand of buddy and find someone who’s not as high maintenance.

8. The One-Trick Pony

We all know that person who thinks whatever they’re doing — be it a diet or a workout plan — is the only way to do things. Sure, a low-carb diet may have helped her drop a few pounds or minute-long planks helped to strengthen his core. But just because it works for your friend doesn’t mean it will work for you. Figure out what kind of workout plan is best for you, and take this kind of buddy’s advice with a shaker of salt.

9. The Recovery Pro

Some days you just need to recover, sit on the couch, and binge on Netflix. A great workout buddy will know when to let you chill out and how to maximize your recovery time so your muscles can fully recharge. They’re always pushing you to foam roll, and they always bring the best healthy snacks to enjoy on rest day.

10. The Motivator

But you can’t sit on the couch for too long! On those days when you’re just not in the mood to workout, it’s crucial to have a support system to keep you motivated. When you can’t get going on your own, the best workout buddy will know just what to say to get you moving.

It’s a tall order finding your perfect workout buddy, but it sure beats working out on your own! What qualities do you look for in a workout partner?

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