Dr. Kyle: Diet Do’s and Don’ts for 2019

 

Looking to start a new diet in 2019? Here are a few tips on what to avoid and what to incorporate into your nutritional regime this year.

FATS ARE GOOD

The human body is designed to process and burn fats as one of its primary energy sources. Fat enhances food digestion and nutrient absorption. Accompany sides of vegetables with a fat source to increase nutrient bioavailability.

Try cooking with animal fats, organic grass-fed butter and coconut oil. Avoid trans fats and poly-unsaturated vegetable oils like canola oil.

Add some wild-caught salmon into your diet to balance out the ratio of omega-3’s to omega-6’s. The typical western diet has an abundance of omega-6’s so eating salmon 1-2 per week will boost your levels of anti-inflammatory omega-3’s.

DON’T SHY AWAY FROM CHOLESTEROL

Cholesterol is vital for the synthesis of hormones and vitamin D. It also helps form cell membranes and other structural components.

Eat whole foods and at least 1 yolk with your egg whites. This will give you a better nutrient profile and a healthy dose of cholesterol.

RED MEATS

Red meats have almost everything you need to not only survive but thrive. They are one of the most micronutrient dense fuel sources on the planet. Red meats are high in b-vitamins, iron, zinc, magnesium, and creatine.

Red meat also includes Lamb! It is an excellent source of heme-iron as well.

GET YOUR PROTEIN

It is most commonly recommended that daily intake should be 1g of protein per pound. Older athletes will need more due to less efficient protein absorption.

Keep in mind that dietary needs will fluctuate based on physical demands and training goals. Athletes trying to put on mass should eat 40g before bed to maintain protein synthesis throughout the night.

20g per meal will provide 90% of muscle protein synthesis. 40g will provide 100%.

Carbohydrates

Some carbs are better then other! So, we want to pick the right ones.

Avoid refined sugars (obviously). Include variation and eat 2 forms of carbs at a time for faster absorption. I recommend sweet potatoes, spinach, red peppers and carrots. These foods have plenty of micronutrients and produce low levels of gas.

Add a side of white rice to your meat and vegetable dish. White rice is easy to digest, and can help supplement your macronutrient intake. Oats on the other hand can be hard to digest – soak them in warm water overnight or add yogurt.

Remember, carbohydrates are used to fuel workouts! Getting adequate carbs to sustain your athletic performance will protect against muscle tissue breakdown.

As always, ask a healthcare professional for dietary recommendations that best suit you. Some foods that work well for others may not sit well for you. Listen to your body.

Stay healthy and good luck achieving all your health and wellness goals for 2019!

Dr. Kyle: Debunking the Salt Myth

Do you pay attention to how much sodium you take in?

Maybe you should!

It turns out that sodium may not be as bad as we previously thought. In fact, sodium is essential for many metabolic processes. Sodium is responsible for regulating blood pressure, maintaining blood volume and is required for neuron function and signal transduction.

Many believe that high (or adequate) salt intake will lead to high blood pressure. Most cases of hypertension are actually a result of genetics or stress. A small percentage of the people who are sodium sensitive may experience an increase in blood pressure, but an overwhelming benefit for the rest of the population cannot be ignored.

Sodium has several benefits including:

• Increased performance
• Increased stamina / endurance
• Increased blood volume
• Increased recovery

During high intensity exercise, the body actually responds better to a higher blood volume. This improves delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the working cells of the body. High blood volumes are also optimal for kidney filtration and removal of toxins and metabolic waste products.

Low dietary sodium and elimination diets can have detrimental effects for high performance athletes. Low salt intake will decrease overall blood volume, making the blood thicker. This can cause muscle weakness, cramps and lethargy.

What Type of Salt?

I recommend iodized salt. Iodine helps with thyroid function and regulates metabolism. Unbleached, pure Himalayan salt is also a good option.

So if you are hitting a wall during your workout it may be due to sodium depletion. Bottom line, make sure you are drinking plenty of water, eating sufficient carbs for your training needs, getting a balance of micronutrients from a variety of whole foods, and don’t be afraid to sprinkle a little salt on your meals every once in a while!

Dr. Phil Shares: Insulin Resistance Causes and Symptoms

One in three North Americans—including half of those age 60 and older— have a silent blood sugar problem known as insulin resistance. Insulin resistance increases the risk for prediabetes, type 2 diabetes and a host of other serious health problems, including heart attacks, strokes and cancer.

What is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin resistance is when cells in your muscles, body fat and liver start resisting or ignoring the signal that the hormone insulin is trying to send out—which is to grab glucose out of the bloodstream and put it into our cells. Glucose, also known as blood sugar, is the body’s main source of fuel. We get glucose from grains, fruit, vegetables, dairy products, and drinks that bring break down into carbohydrates.

How Insulin Resistance Develops

While genetics, aging and ethnicity play roles in developing insulin sensitivity, the driving forces behind insulin resistance include excess body weight, too much belly fat, a lack of exercise, smoking, and even skimping on sleep.4

As insulin resistance develops, your body fights back by producing more insulin. Over months and years, the beta cells in your pancreas that are working so hard to make insulin get worn out and can no longer keep pace with the demand for more and more insulin. Then – years after insulin resistance silently began – your blood sugar may begin to rise and you may develop prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. You may also develop non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a growing problem associated with insulin resistance that boosts your risk for liver damage and heart disease. 5

Signs and Symptoms of Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is usually triggered by a combination of factors linked to weight, age, genetics, being sedentary and smoking.

– A large waist. Experts say the best way to tell whether you’re at risk for insulin resistance involves a tape measure and moment of truth in front of the bathroom mirror. A waist that measures 35 inches or more for women, 40 or more for men (31.5 inches for women and 35.5 inches for men if you’re of Southeast Asian, Chinese or Japanese descent)increases the odds of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, which is also linked to insulin resistance.

– You have additional signs of metabolic syndrome. According to the National Institutes of Health,in addition to a large waist, if you have three or more of the following, you likely have metabolic syndrome, which creates insulin resistance.

  • High triglycerides. Levels of 150 or higher, or taking medication to treat high levels of these blood fats.
  • Low HDLs. Low-density lipoprotein levels below 50 for women and 40 for men – or taking medication to raise low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels.
  • High blood pressure. Readings of 130/85 mmHg or higher, or taking medication to control high blood pressure
  • High blood sugar. Levels of 100-125 mg/dl (the prediabetes range) or over 125 (diabetes).
  • High fasting blood sugar (or you’re on medicine to treat high blood sugar). Mildly high blood sugar may be an early sign of diabetes.

– You develop dark skin patches. If insulin resistance is severe, you may have visible skin changes. These include patches of darkened skin on the back of your neck or on your elbows, knees, knuckles or armpits. This discoloration is called acanthosis nigricans.8

Health Conditions Related to Insulin Resistance

An estimated 87 million American adults have prediabetes; 30-50% will go on to develop full-blown type 2 diabetes. In addition, up to 80% of people with type 2 diabetes have NAFLD.9 But those aren’t the only threats posed by insulin resistance.

Thanks to years of high insulin levels followed by an onslaught of cell-damaging high blood sugar, people with insulin resistance, prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance doubles your risk for heart attack and stroke – and triples the odds that your heart attack or ‘brain attack’ will be deadly, according to the International Diabetes Federation.10

Meanwhile, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome are also linked with higher risk for cancers of the bladder, breast, colon, cervix, pancreas, prostate and uterus.11, 12  The connection: High insulin levels early in insulin resistance seem to fuel the growth of tumors and to suppress the body’s ability to protect itself by killing off malignant cells. 13

How You Can Prevent or Reverse Insulin Resistance

Losing weight, getting regular exercise and not skimping on sleep can all help improve your insulin sensitivity. Don’t rely on dieting or exercise alone: in one fascinating University of New Mexico School of Medicine study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, overweight people who lost 10% of their weight through diet plus exercise saw insulin sensitivity improve by an impressive 80%. Those who lost the same amount of weight through diet alone got a 38% increase. And those who simply got more exercise, but didn’t lose much weight, saw almost no shift in their level of insulin resistance.14 

Turn in on time, too. In a study presented at the 2015 meeting of the Obesity Society, researchers found that just one night of sleep deprivation boosted insulin resistance as much as eating high-fat foods for six months.15

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Dr. Kyle: Sport Injury Rehabilitation

 

There are many factors to consider before clearing an athlete to return to sport. Time since injury, improvements in range of motion and increases in joint stability are all good metrics to evaluate before giving an athlete the green light.

Many rehabilitation programs focus primarily on enhancing maximal muscle strength. Current research suggests that Rate of Force Development (RFD) may actually be a better predictive factor in determining whether an athlete is ready for sport.

Common athletic maneuvers such as pivoting, jumping and stop-and-starts require rapid stabilization of the joints in the lower limb. This requires almost instantaneous muscle activation to prevent joint displacement and avoid re-injury. Factors such as neural activation, fiber composition and muscle contractile properties influence RFD and the body’s ability to absorb load on the joint. Therefore, it may not matter how strong the muscle is, but rather how fast the muscle can fire.

So how might this change rehabilitation programs?

Most physical rehabilitation protocols help build strength but fail to include an explosive component. Because athletic demands are often variable and unpredictable, it is important for the muscles to be able to react to any situation. Incorporating explosive plyometric exercises and a variation of sport specific drills will improve RFD and prevent future injury.

Take home points for sport-injury rehab:

• Allow sufficient time to for healing process to occur
• Recover full range of motion and flexibility
• Progressively overload the muscle to build strength
• Explosive training to enhance ability of muscle to generate force rapidly.
• Incorporate plyometric and sport specific drills to complement athletic demands.

As always, the best way to stay in the game is to avoid injury in the first place. So don’t wait for the pain to start before implementing an effective strength AND conditioning program.

If you or someone you know is suffering from a sport injury, call and book an appointment today for a complete musculoskeletal assessment!

 

Reference:
Buckthorpe, M., & Roi, G. S. (2018). The time has come to incorporate a greater focus on rate of force development training in the sports injury rehabilitation process. Muscles, ligaments and tendons journal, 7(3), 435-441. doi:10.11138/mltj/2017.7.3.435