Dr. Laura: Signs of Blood Clot

Swelling, tenderness, redness in the legs, shortness of breath and or chest pain are all signs of a blood clot. This is an emergent condition and needs to be addressed immediately. To prevent a blood clot, there are plenty of natural remedies that will help.

C-L-OT-S Awareness Campaign

Spread the word on the CLOTS awareness campaign. A clot in blood is the underlying cause of the top three cardiovascular killers: heart attack, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE). If symptoms of chest pain, lightheadedness, shortness of breath, leg tenderness and or leg swelling emerge, a visit to the emergency room is best to rule out anything serious.

C – Chest Pain

L– Lightheadedness

O– Out of breath

T- Leg Tenderness

S– Leg Swelling

Natural ways to help thin the blood

Did you know there are a number of natural health products that help thin the blood? Things taken regularly in substantial enough quantities or in combinations like fish oil, curcumin, Dong quai, dan shen, onion, reishi, papain, devil’s claw, garlic, ginkgo, feverfew, ginger, clove oil, horse chestnut, bilberry, kava kava, evening primrose oil, borage, black current, dandelion root, cayenne fruit, green tea, and vitamin  E all inhibit platelet aggregation (thin the blood). These natural remedies also have other actions on the body so you must seek professional advice for what products are right for you. Taking natural remedies to help thin the blood may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular events, and reduce the need or amount of prescription medication.

Naturopathic doctors are trained are medically trained and naturally focussed. Need relief from swelling, pain or fatigue? Call 519 826.7973 or book your appointment online

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND is a Naturopathic Doctor, a Certified Gluten Practitioner, a HeartMathCertified Practitioner and is a graduate of Adapt Level 1 at KresserInstitute of Functional Medicine. Essentially, Dr. Brownhelps people better digest their food and the word around them.

Naturopathic Medicine Week

Join us in celebrating the goodness in life!

Root Cause Medicine

Do you want to figure out the root cause of your problems?

Need to remove obstacles to health and support the body’s natural mechanisms of healing? Naturopathic medicine might be a good choice for you. Look below for the oath we take as naturopathic doctors. Learn about some of the extras Dr. Laura M.Brown, ND has under her wings of expertise and find out how to get the care you need.

Naturopathic Doctor’s Oath

I dedicate myself to the service of humanity as a practitioner of the art and science of naturopathic medicine.

By precept, education and example, I will assist and encourage others to strengthen their health, reduce risks for disease, and preserve the health of our planet for ourselves and future generations.

I will continually endeavour to improve my abilities.

I will conduct my life and practice of naturopathic medicine with integrity and freedom from prejudice.

I will keep confident what should not be divulged.

I will honour the principles of naturopathic medicine:

  • First to do no harm.
  • To co-operate with the healing power of nature.
  • To address the fundamental causes of disease.
  • To heal the whole person through individualize treatment.
  • To teach the principles of healthy living and preventative medicine.

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND helps people better digest food and the world around them.


Certifications

Registered Naturopathic Doctor

Certified HeartMath® Practitioner

Certified Gluten Practitioner

ADAPT Trained Practitioner

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND is a registered naturopathic doctor with a Functional Medicine approach.  She has advanced training in pharmaceuticals, is a certified HeartMath Practitioner and a Certified Gluten Practitioner  and holds the designation of ADAPT Trained Practitioner from Kresser Institute, the only Functional Medicine and ancestral health training company.

The Healing is Within

Your physical, emotional, cognitive and spiritual aspects are wholly considered.

You will engage in skills that lead to long-lasting health and wellness.

Community Engagement

 Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND engages regularly in opportunities to speak and teach at various community events.

Need More to Feel Comfortable?

 www.naturalaura.ca

 ca.linkedin.com/in/laurambrown 

Book a 15 min free consult by calling 519.826.7973

Ready to Get Started?

Book Online Now

Dr. Laura: Understand PMS

Premenstrual Syndrome, or PMS can come in a variety of patterns. A whirlwind of emotions, cravings and weight gain often come in tote with the monthly menstrual cycle. Better understand the impacts of the monthly swing in hormones and get the help you need to live a more balanced life.

PMS-A: Anxiety

Anxiety or irritability can come from estrogen excess or progesterone drops. This imbalance in the two major female hormones can make some feel like they want to crawl out of their own skin. Increased levels of estrogen in the second half of the period can allow adrenaline to build up and alter the serotonin balance. Natural treatment includes supportive measures for estrogen clearance, progesterone building herbs, regular moderate exercise, a healthy diet and stress management.

PMS-C: Carbohydrate Craving

Cravings for sweets and refined carbohydrates, feeling hangry, tired or having a headache all fall under the category of PMS-C. Abnormal variations in blood sugar may be a factor of magnesium levels – and this gives into the common cravings for chocolate as dark chocolate is high in magnesium. Noteworthy: a change in serotonin levels can also increase sugar cravings. Therefore, factors in insulin regulation are key and are a focus of treatment. Finally, herbal formulas are also available to reduce the satisfaction of sweets and crush the cravings.

PMS-D: Depression

In addition to anxiety, mood changes throughout the cycle can also lean towards depressive states. Symptoms that suggest the need to modify the stress response include crying, fatigue, headaches, feeling overwhelmed or out of control, and difficulty sleeping. Adaptogenic herbs may be helpful to support the stress response. Chinese formulas and botanical medicine formulas that include nerviness, anxiolytics and antidepressants can be very effective in PMS-D treatment. Certainly, nutraceuticals may also be helpful to modulate levels of serotonin, GABA, and dopamine and thyroid hormone levels should also be monitored, especially if the periods are heavy. Neurotransmitter hormones can be evaluated with take home urine tests called Organic Acid Tests (OATs).

PMS-H: Hyperhydration

Fluid retention is a common PMS complaint. Breast tenderness and distension, bloating, weight gain, swollen hands and feet can all be classified under PMS-H. An increase in circulating aldosterone levels is linked to decreased progesterone and magnesium with increased estrogen. Reduce salt and sodium intake (bread and cheese) and increase sources of potassium (bananas, baked potato with the skin, dandelion leaf tea). Treatment of Liver Qi stagnation with acupuncture and Chinese formulas are often very good at reducing PMS-H.

Naturally Navigate PMS

Naturally navigate your health with Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Naturopathic doctors can provide individualized treatment to manage hormones. The whole body is considered, the physical, emotional, cognitive and spiritual. When it comes to hormone balance, the naturopathic tool box is rich. Bring balance to your hormones and bring balance back into your life.

Start your evaluation on your own!

Start your evaluation on your own! Use Clue, the period and ovulation tracker, which is a free Ap for iPhone and Androids. Take note of your diet with the use of aps that help you track dietary, lifestyle and nutritional habits. Bring all this to your first appointment. You may also be a good candidate for a take home urine test. Stress and reproductive hormone can be assessed with an at home urine test, (DUTCH), available and interpreted with your naturopathic doctor.

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND is a Naturopathic Doctor, a Certified Gluten Practitioner, a HeartMathCertified Practitioner and is a graduate of Adapt Level 1 at KresserInstitute of Functional Medicine. Essentially, Dr. Brown helps people better digest their food and the word around them.

Dr. Phil Shares: 8 Bad Habits That Kill Your Metabolism

You may already suspect your metabolism slows as you age. According to research published in the Public Health Nutrition journal, you’re right. In a review of data on energy expenditure, researchers found simply getting older is associated with progressive declines in basal metabolic rate. On top of that, there are many daily habits that can drain your metabolism even further.

But you don’t have to go down without a fight. Cut out the below habits and watch your metabolism and energy levels improve.

Eating a nutritious breakfast is always a good way to start your morning. Because your metabolism slows down during sleep, eating can fire it up and help you burn more calories throughout the day. According to Rush University Medical Center, “When you eat breakfast, you’re telling your body that there are plenty of calories to be had for the day. When you skip breakfast, the message your body gets is that it needs to conserve rather than burn any incoming calories.”

OK, so it’s about more than just eating something in the morning. If you grab a sugary donut or eat a muffin in the car, you’re setting yourself up to crash later. Instead, choose something with filling protein and fiber like eggs, yogurt and berries or whole-wheat toast topped with peanut butter.

Going from your office chair to your car to your couch can lead to a very sedentary routine. And sitting for extended periods puts your body into energy-conservation mode, which means your metabolism can suffer. According to the UK’s National Health Service, “Sitting for long periods is thought to slow metabolism, which affects the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar, blood pressure and break down body fat.”

Cardio is great, and it can quickly burn calories, but once you’re done running or cycling, your calorie burn quickly returns to normal. When you do HIIT and resistance-based workouts, however, your calorie burn stays elevated for longer as your muscles repair themselves. Per the American Council on Exercise (ACE): “Strength training is a key component of metabolism because it is directly linked to muscle mass. The more active muscle tissue you have, the higher your metabolic rate.” And, according to ACE, a pound of muscle burns an additional 4–6 calories each day compared to a pound of fat.

Protein feeds your muscles, promotes satiety and is an important component to sustaining a healthy weight. Eat too little, and you may have trouble building or maintaining muscle mass — and per the above, we know muscle’s importance to metabolism. Also, protein requires more energy to break down than carbs or fat, so you’ll actually burn more calories during digestion.

One bad night’s sleep is enough to leave you feeling sluggish and impair your cognitive processing. String together several nights in a row — or a lifetime of inadequate sleep — and science shows decreased metabolism and hormonal imbalances may follow.

In a study published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, researchers found drinking 500 milliliters of water (about 2 cups) increases metabolic rate by 30%, and that spike lasts for more than an hour. So, drink water throughout the day to stay hydrated, and you’ll get the added benefit of a boosted metabolism.

When stress levels increase, your body produces a hormone called cortisol. Cortisol leads to increased appetite, makes us crave comfort foods, decreases our desire to exercise and reduces sleep quality — all things that negatively impact metabolism. So, while you can’t always control your stress levels, managing stress can go a long way toward protecting your body’s internal fire.

by Kevin Gray

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

SaveTagscreating healthy habitslosing weightmetabolism

Dr. Laura: Drugs that affect the microbiome

Drugs are one of the major factors that affect the microbiome. The impacts vary depending on the drug and duration of treatment.

The environmentfoodstress and drugs  all contribute to changes in the microbiome. This is why it is important to recognize and address any contributors that cause troubles.

Clinical intake and tests flushes out root causes and provide clarity. 

Why should I care?

Unique patterns in the microbiome link to different diseases. An unhealthy microbiome links to depression, anxiety, autistic disordersvitamin and mineral status (nutrient absorption)hormone production,  eczemadiabetes, obesity, arthritis and inflammatory bowel psoriasis and other autoimmune, conditions, heart healthcholesterolnon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), diseases.  Research continues to expand this list.  

What is the microbiome?

The human microbiome exists in the gastrointestinal/urogenital tract and the skin. The trillions of cells that make up our microbiome actually out number the human cells that we have in our body by tenfold. Are we microbes having a human experience?

Healthy microbiome?

A healthy regular stool is not always indicative of a healthy microbiome. History of autoimmune conditions, food sensitivity, sugar cravings, gas, pain, bloating, bad breath, candidiasis, brain fog, mood changes, weight issues, skin issues, joint pain, trauma, stress, headaches, use of birth control or other hormones, frequent use of antibiotics and certain drugs can all be factors or indicators of microbiome disruption. 

What drugs affect the microbiome?

Your microbiome may be out of balance if you are currently, or have history of taking, any of the following drugs:

  • Antibiotics
  • Cancer Therapies
  • Antihistamines
  • Antidiabetic drugs
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs
  • GI disorder drugs
  • Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Anti-psychotic drugs
  • Anti-coagulants
  • Hormones: estrogen, birth control, thyroid hormone

Find out more…tests available

One helpful test to look at the key players of the microbiome is the comprehensive stool and parasitic analysis. Knowledge of the landscape certainly helps streamline the treatment. 

Food sensitivities often rise when the microbiome is off balance. It is important to recognize the foods that are bothersome. Then remove them for a while and do the work to remove unwanted microbes and replace with healthy ones while repairing the gastrointestinal tract lining. Protocols are patient specific based on the microbiome the lining of gastrointestinal tract and the overall health of the patient. 

Dr. Laura M. Brown ND is a Naturopathic Doctor with a functional medicine approach. She is a Certified Gluten Practitioner, a HeartMath Certified Practitioner and is a graduate of Adapt Level 1 at Kresser Institute of Functional Medicine. Essentially, Dr. Brown helps people better digest their food and the word around them. More at www.naturalaura.ca and  www.forwardhealth.ca

Dr. Laura: Dangers of Proton Pump Inhibitors

Proton Pump Inhibitors, or PPI’s may help gastrointestinal reflux (GERD) in the short term, but they increase risk of many long term negative effects.

Long Term Side Effects of PPIs

When proton pump inhibitors are taken for an extended length of time, they can ™cause a shift in the gut microbiome that –increases risks for:

  • liver disease like alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis
  • increased risk for cardiovascular events, kidney disease and dementia. 
  • Nutritional deficiencies, especially B12 and iron.


GERD

™Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is caused from a faulty lower esophageal sphincter valve. ™Backs up content of stomac acid burns™ the esophageal lining. For many, a trip to the conventional doctor mean a prescription of proton pump inibitors – a drug that often ends in an -prazole. Like omeprazole, pantoprazole, for example.

Causes of GERD

  • bacterial overgrowth
  • lazy sphincter
  • food sensitivity

Interesting fact is the real cause of GERD may be from not enough stomach acid, rather than too much. If this is the case, taking a proton pump inhibitor, which lessens stomach acid can actually make the problem worse. Tests for H. pylori, a bacteria that can sometimes overgrow in the stomach may be necessary. H. pylori likes to reduce the level of stomach acid so it can thrive. Lower stomach acid means food is not properly digested and this can lead to fullness in the stomach and regurgitation or GERD.

The gastric-esophageal sphincter may be lazy and in need of tonification. Proton pump inhibitors won’t address this issue, however botanical medicine can often help.

Another reason to skip the proton pump inhibitor and look for the root cause is that GERD is often a result of food sensitivity. Food sensitivities related to GERD can be more than the typical caffeine, peppermint, spicy foods and citrus that commonly aggravate the issue.

For help with this and more digestive concerns, book online, contact drlaurambrown@forwardhealth.ca or call 519 826 7973 to book your appointment today.


Dr. Laura: Why do processed foods get such a bad wrap?

Advanced Glycated End products

AGES– Advanced Glycated End products area product of food processing. AGEs appear to stimulate chronic low-grade inflammation and promote oxidative stress and affect the pancreatic beta cell function leading to the development of insulin resistance. Stop AGE diets in animal models and diabetes stops.

Bad Fats

Fats– Not all are created equal! Processed foods use trans fats to prolong shelf life, saturated fats because they are cheap and tasty. Transfats and arachadonic acids create inflammation in the body. This increases risk for plaques in the vascular system, increases cholesterol and ultimately blood pressure. In contrast, when healthy fats like omega 3 fatty acids (aka high quality fish oil) the inflammation markers go down, the cell is better able to perform its function. Since every cell has a phospholipid bilayer. This means that every cell’s skin is made of fat. When fat is of a fluid nature, nutrients are able pass in and out more effectively and the cell’s function is optimized.

Food Dyes

Dyes–The processed food industry uses food dyes to add colour to colourless foods, to enhance colour and to avoid colour loss due to environmental elements and to preserve consistency when there are variations in the colour of food. Food dyes are know to cause inattention, hyperactivity, irritability, temper tantrums or trouble sleeping.

Sugars

Sugar & high fructose corn syrup. Most processed foods have some sugar added including soda pop, breads, cereals, yogurts, processed meats, soups and condiments. High-sugar diets may make a significant contribution to cardio-metabolic risk.  High fructose corn syrup, when digested by the body produces reactive carbonyls, which creates tissue damage. Countries using high-fructose corn syrup had rates of diabetes that were about 20% higher than countries that didn’t mix the sweetener into foods, even when total sugar and total calories remain the same.

Salt

Salt– Processed foods use salt to help preserve it and for added flavour. The amount of salt in restaurant and packaged foods are the main culprits in the Western diet, not the salt added to home-prepared whole foods.  Research shows that the average North American consumes 4000mg sodium per 2000kcal diet. This is almost twice as much as the 2300mg/day recommend by some health experts. If the amount reduces even to 2700mg/day, a 5mmHg smaller rise in systolic blood pressure would be noted in those 25-55 years of age. This results in an estimated 150,000 lives saved from death due to cardiovascular events. The kicker is, if not getting annual checkups, often the first sign of high blood pressure, is a deadly heart attack.

White Flour

White flour  – Without the fibre, white flour easily breaks down quickly into simple carbohydrates, which is essentially sugar to the body. Processed foods are full of white flour. The fast breakdown quickly elevates blood sugar, induces insulin release and quickly and causes cravings for more sugar to restore blood sugar levels. The cycle easily repeats itself as quick carbs are continually fed into the body. Over time and continued food abuse, the insulin that works diligently to get the sugar into the cells, becomes less effective, the sugar stays in the blood stream and the person is now experiencing high blood sugar levels and insulin resistance… a path well travelled to the diabetes destination.

Dr. Laura: Boost your energy

The energy powerhouses of cells are called mitochondria. These tiny organelles are derived solely from our mother’s DNA and are reposible for generating the energy our bodies need to run.

Mity Mitochondria

  • Make up about 10% of our body weight
  • 200-2000 per body cell
  • relies on the fats, carbohydrates and proteins we eat
  • loves to run on ketones
  • Needs nutrients like calcium, B vitamins, CoQ10, N-Acetyl-Cysteine, Magnesium, Alpha lipoid acid, lysine

Energy Drains

Fatigue comes from drains on the mitochondrial function. This can happen with any type of toxic burden:

  • long term nutrient deficiency
  • poor sleep habits
  • hormonal disruption
  • eating too much in general
  • eating too much sugar
  • excessive exercise
  • heavy metals
  • viruses and spirochetes (Lymes)
  • pesticides
  • plastics, PCB’s
  • drugs
  • mold

Signs of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

Unexplained fatigue, the need for more than 8 hours of sleep on an ongoing basis, poor exercise recovery, impaired sense of smell or taste, headaches, poor motivation, depression, anxiety, brain fog, forgetfulness, extra sensitive to light and noise – are all indicators of poor mitochondrial dysfunction. While other things may be at play like poor thyroid function, hypothalamus, pituitary or adrenal function, it is important to also consider the mitochondria.

Boost Your Energy

Support the mitochondria and reclaim your energy. An initial naturopathic appointment will start the process to understand the source of your energy drain. Together a same day plan could initiate the changes required to boost energy.

Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

Dr. Laura on Potassium Levels

Potassium is a mineral that dissolves in water and carries and electrical charge. Easy to see how it can act as an electrolyte.

Nerve, muscle, and heart function all depend on the appropriate level of potassium.It is absorbed in the small intestine and excreted mostly in the urine, and some in the sweat and stool.

The kidney is the main regulator of potassium levels, so if it is healthy and you are getting regular food sources of it, there likely is no reason to be concerned about the levels of potassium in the body.

Potassium’s role in the body.

  • fluid and electrolyte balance
  • maintains nerve and muscle growth
  • balances pH (acid/base balance)
  • contributes to heart function
  • assists in the use of carbohydrates and proteins
  • interacts with blood pressure
  • supports healthy metabolism and blood sugar regulation.

 

Food sources of potassium

  • acorn squash
  • artichokes
  • bananas
  • citrus
  • dried fruits
  • dark leafy greens
  • dried beans
  • legumes
  • nuts
  • potatoes (white and sweet)
  • soy
  • tomatoes
  • cod
  • salmon

Low levels of potassium

Potassium deficiency, or hypokalemia may be noted by fatigue, weakness, muscle cramps, heart palpitations, cardiac arrhythmia’s, hypertension, and postural hypotension. Trouble is, low potassium looks very much like high potassium, however it is more likely to have low levels

Low serum potassium can be caused by inadequate dietary intake, certain drugs, dialysis, plasmapheresis, increased potassium entry into the cells, decreased potassium exit from cells, and increased losses in the urine, gastrointestinal tract, or sweat.

High levels of potassium

Hyperkalemia rarely produces physical symptoms. Excessive potassium can disturb heart and skeletal muscle function, cause nausea, fatigue, muscle aches and weakness and increased respiratory rate.

Some medications can lead to higher than normal potassium levels:  ACE (angiotensin-converting enzymes), some antibiotics, anticoagulants, ARBS (angiotensin-receptor blockers), beta-blockers, COX-2 inhibitors, cyclosporine, antifungals, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs- Advil, Motrin), and potassium sparing diuretics.

Fasting, high blood sugar, metabolic acidosis, kidney insufficiency are all contributors to high levels of potassium.

Measuring potassium

Unless there is a state of severe deficiency, it can be difficult to assess proper levels of potassium. Blood serum levels may be normal, while blood cellular levels deficient. Beyond this, levels in the muscles may not reflect either the levels of blood cell or serum.

So long as the kidneys are functioning well and no drugs (as mentioned above) interfere,  there is generally no need to worry about higher intakes of potassium, as it will be sufficiently excreted.

References:

Kresser, Chris. 2018 Adapt Level One Blood Chemistry Manual. www.kresserinstitute.com

Lavalle, James. 2013 Your Blood Never Lies. Square One Publishers Garden City Park, NY.

Gaby A. 2011 Nutritional Medicine. Fritz Perl Publishing Concord, NH.

Dr. Laura: 5 ways to strengthen your immune system

Immune system need a boost? Support it with one or a combination of these top five natural ways. A strong immune system means less colds and flu, especially through this winter and early spring season.

As a start, be sure to wash your hands regularly with soap and water keep indoor humidity around 45-50%. Then, visit your naturopathic doctor to find what is the best combination of these five following things you need to strengthen your immune system.

1. Probiotics

2. Adaptogens

3. Medicinal Mushrooms

4. Vitamins

5. Minerals

 

Probiotics

We know that 70% of your immune system resides in the gastrointestinal tract, so it makes perfect sense to keep a healthy balance of your microflora. Research in probiotics is very active and there may be new strains available to help you balance yours.

Adaptogens

The adrenal glands are little hat like glands that sit atop the kidneys.  When you think of cold weather, think of hats and think of adrenal support. Resilience to stress can keep illness at bay but when we are constantly under stress at work, at home and toxins build up from pesticides, environmental factors, drugs, allergens – we need help. There are a number of adaptogenic herbs like holy basil, ashwagandha, ginsengs, liquorice, schisandra, codonopsis, astragalus and rhodiola that can be custom blended to support your needs.

Medicinal Mushrooms

Medicinal mushrooms can be an amazing support for the immune system. Helpful are hot water extracts of mushrooms like maitake (Grifola frondosa), reishi (Gandoderma lucidum), Cordyceps, shitake (Lentinus edodes), turkey tail (Coriolus versicolor), and sun mushroom (Agaricus blazei). It is possible to get these in different combinations and even in packets to make a “tea”.

Vitamins

Vitamin A, C, E top the list for immune support. Oranges, citrus and bell pepper provide Vitamin C.    The beta-carotene in orange and red vegetables will convert to Vitamin A in most people. Cod liver oil is a viable direct source of vitamin A.  Wheat germ oil and almonds pack a punch of vitamin E. There are formulas available that combine these vitamins with some minerals and they can often be a sure way of getting the support you need every day.

Minerals

Zinc, Selenium and Magnesium are truly critical for the immune system to function. A varied diet will often provide enough. Bone soup broths are a great, as are pumpkin seeds for the zinc, brazil nuts for the selenium and dark leafy greens for the magnesium.

 

This blog does not constitute medical advice. Natural products can interfere with existing medical conditions and prescription drugs. Be safe and get the knowledge and advice of a naturopathic doctor.

From the heart and mind of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND