Rick’s Vegetable Stock Recipe!

Fresh vegetable stock is the key ingredient for wonderful homemade soups and sauces this Fall Season, and the best part is that if you make it, you know exactly what’s in it!

Makes: 2.5 litres of stock

Ingredients:
2 Leeks roughly chopped
2 sticks of celery roughly chopped
2 Large onions chopped into quarters
1 Large green, red or yellow pepper seeded and chopped into large pieces
2 Large carrots roughly chopped
6 Large mushrooms quartered
1 Parsnip chopped
2 Large tomatoes seeded and roughly chopped
3 Tbs light soy sauce
3 Bay Leaves
3 Sprigs fresh thyme
3 Sprigs fresh rosemary
2 Tsp Sea Salt
2 Tsp garlic
Fresh Ground Pepper
3 Litres cold water

Instructions:
Put all ingredients into a large stock pot and bring slowly to the boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 30 minutes stirring periodically.
Allow to cool. Strain and discard the vegetables (alternatively some of the vegetables can be puréed in the blender and added back for a heartier stock).
Keep stock in the refrigerator to use in soups and sauces. Stock can also be frozen for use at a later date.

Dr. Phil Shares: How Often Should I Work Out to Maintain?

How Often Should I Work Out to Maintain My Weight?

You put in the hours, pumping iron, logging miles, sweating buckets, overhauling your diet, and (most important) staying consistent.

And the results speak for themselves — every time you look in the mirror, a leaner, more athletic person stares back at you. You’ve even bought yourself a new wardrobe. So now what?

Some people will keep going, perhaps taking up triathlons, joining a hoops league, or training for the CrossFit Games.

But others will want to take their foot off the gas and appreciate what they’ve accomplished.

The key is not to leave it off for too long — two weeks of inactivity are all it takes to notice significant declines in strength and cardiovascular fitness, according to a study in the Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine.

Indeed, the body is incredibly efficient at adapting to whatever demands (or lack thereof) are placed on it.

So now that you’ve crossed the finish line, how can you keep from backpedaling and losing what you’ve built? Just follow these simple steps.

1. Cut Back Gradually

Smart training plans (like those available on Beachbody On Demand) can allow you to work out 5 or 6 days a week with no ill effects (read: overtraining).

But once you reach your strength and endurance goals, you can reduce your workout frequency without losing your hard-earned gains, according to a study at the University of Alabama.

The researchers found that adults aged 20 to 35 who worked out just one day a week not only saw no loss of muscle but actually continued to gain it (albeit at a greatly reduced rate).

Our recommendation: Start by reducing your workout frequency by a third, then a half, and so on until you find the minimal effective dose that’s right for you.

2. Keep It Intense

Even a single set of a strength-training exercise can produce hypertrophy (i.e., muscle growth), according to a study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

So if your goal is to hold on to what you have, one or two sets per move per workout should do the trick.

The key is to keep them challenging; you should always feel like you stopped two reps short of failure.

Take a similar approach with cardio: In a study in the journal Physiological Reports, a team of British researchers found that a single, intense, 20-minute interval workout every five days allowed participants to maintain levels of cardiovascular fitness built through much higher frequency training programs.

3. Dial In Your Diet

Here’s the one category where you might have to be more diligent than you were before you reached your goal.

As you cut back on your workouts, you’re going to start burning fewer calories. To avoid the fate of the ex-athlete who balloons 50 pounds when he hangs up his cleats, tighten up your diet as you reduce your training time.

“On the days you don’t work out, cut 300 to 500 calories from your diet,” says Dr. Jade Teta, founder of The Metabolic Effect, a fitness and nutrition coaching service focused on maximizing results with minimal effort. “Ideally, those calories should come from starchy carbs and sources of empty calories [i.e., junk food] rather than from protein or veggies,” says Teta.

4. Stay Flexible

These general guidelines are just that: general guidelines. Though lower frequency, more intense workouts seem to work for most people looking to maintain their fitness gains, there’s no “one-size-fits-all” solution.

“It’s going to be different for everyone,” says Teta.

So be a detective: Monitor your strength, weight, definition, and overall sense of well-being as you tweak your exercise and eating habits, and be ready to adjust everything up or down accordingly.

BY: Andrew Heffernan CSCS, GCFP

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Dr. Laura: Menopause-could probiotics be the answer?

The microbiome shows distinct differences in pre and post menopausal women, a 2019 study reports.

The change in microbiome could help us better understand the reasons for health decline in many post-menopausal women. The presence of estrogen protects against cardiovascular, metabolic disease and bone health. Now mounting evidence shows how the gut microbiota affects estrogen metabolism levels. It is unclear if the post-menopausal decline in estrogen is directly related to the change in diversity of the microbiome. We do know that estrogen hold some regulatory capacity in the immune system and more than 70% of the immune system resides in the gut.

Bone health

Additionally, probiotics can help in bone mineral matrix as the microbes in the gut are responsible for secreting a host of metabolites into the blood stream. Aging women tend to have more Tolumonas microbes. These particular bacterium produce toluene which can reduce bone mineral density.

Some evidence that compares the microbiome of the pre and post menopausal women showed that the bacteria seemed to be more satisfied in the earlier years and tend to compete with each other for nutrient substrates in later years. A decline in estrogen after menopause could increase the bacterial demand for calcium.

Cardiovascular health

Post-menopausal women have a microbiome that produces more cysteine and homocysteine. These components absorb across the small intestine into the blood stream and pose as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. You can take a lab test to measure you homocysteine levels.

Immune health

It is important to uphold a diverse microbiome to keep the immune system healthy and strong. Older women have higher levels of E.coli and Bacteroides and lower levels of bacteria in the Firmicutes family. Younger women have more Roseburia and less Parabacteroides. The ratios of these microbes in older women links to metabolic and endocrine disorders.

Probiotics for anti-aging

This might be all Greek to you and me, (actually the names of all these critters are in Latin), but the take away is pretty cool. Some of the difference found between pre and post menopausal individuals may provide leadership into the field of anti-aging with probiotic therapy.

References

Hui ZhaoJuanjuan ChenXiaoping LiQiang SunPanpan QinQi Wang Compositional and functional features of the female premenopausal and postmenopausal gut microbiota. First published: 05 July 2019 https://doi.org/10.1002/1873-3468.13527