Dr. Phil Shares: Lifting Weights Could Lower Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Lifting Weights Could Lower Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A whopping 30 million North Americans have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes — and more than 84 million more have higher than normal blood glucose levels (called prediabetes) and are at risk for developing the disease. Obesity is the leading risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes.

The rising rates of Type 2 diabetes also mean increased potential for developing serious health complications ranging from heart disease and stroke to vision loss and premature death. Exercise could be the antidote.

THE IMPACT OF EXERCISE ON TYPE 2 DIABETES

Several studies have found exercise can prevent or delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes; some research has shown a 58% risk reduction among high-risk populations. While much of the research has looked at the impact of moderate-to high-intensity cardiovascular exercise, a new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings examined the potential impact of strength training on Type 2 diabetes risk. The data showed building muscle strength was associated with a 32% lowered risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Study co-author Yuehan Wang, PhD, notes resistance training may help improve glucose levels by increasing lean body mass and reducing waist circumference, which is associated with insulin resistance — and achieving results doesn’t require lifting heavy weights or spending countless hours in the gym.

“Our study showed that very high levels of resistance training may not be necessary to obtain considerable health benefits on preventing Type 2 diabetes,” Wang says. “Small and simple resistance exercises like squats and planks can benefit your health even if you don’t lose any weight.”

Think twice before abandoning the treadmill or elliptical trainer for the weight room, advises Eric Shiroma, ScD, staff scientist at the National Institute on Aging.

As part of a 2018 study, Shiroma and his colleagues followed more than 35,000 healthy women for 14 years and found women who incorporated strength training into their workouts experienced a 30% lowered risk of Type 2 diabetes but women who also participated in cardiovascular activities experienced additional risk reduction.

“When comparing the same amount of time in all cardio, strength [training] or a combination, the combination had the most Type 2 diabetes risk reduction,” Shiroma explains.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Researchers are still unclear about which type of exercise could have the biggest impact on reducing your risk. Wang suggests erring on the side of caution and following a workout regimen that blends both pumping iron and heart-pumping cardio, explaining, “Both strength training and cardiovascular aerobic training are important for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes.”

The biggest takeaway, according to Shiroma, is any amount of exercise is beneficial for reducing Type 2 diabetes risk so do pushups or take a walk around the block as long as you get moving.

by Jodi Helmer

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Dr. Kaitlyn: Support your immune system this fall

It’s that time of the year! Fall is always a busy season with everyone heading back to their routines after a relaxing summer. With the drastic changes in temperature outside it is only a matter of time before we see colds and flus everywhere. At this time of the year, it’s important to support our immune systems and prepare our bodies for a cold winter season.

Here are some simple ways that you can support your body’s immune system.

Good hygiene: Wash your hands frequently, especially before eating and after touching public surfaces (like door handles). If you do happen to catch a virus, sneeze into your elbow (not your hands) to prevent spreading germs to others.

Hydration: Drinking enough water is always important to keep our bodies working their best.

Sleep: There is a well known association showing that those of us who are not getting adequate sleep tend to get sick more often.

Nutrient dense foods: We all know that consuming plenty of fruits and veggies is important for our health. Did you know that choosing warming foods such as ginger, spices and garlic can help your body withstand the switch to cooler temperatures? Eating plenty of warming foods during the change in season is common practice in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Supplements: There are plenty of important vitamins and minerals that can be taken in supplemental form to help support our body’s natural immunity. While these supplements are widely available, it is important to speak with your naturopathic doctor to choose the right product and dose for you.