Science of the Heart

Certified HeartMath Practitioner and Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND explains how the heart and brain communicate and how the activity of the heart influences our perceptions, emotions, intuition and health.

How does the heart communicate?

Pulse

The pulse is measured in beats per minute. A normal adult resting heart rate is 60-90 beats per minute. The heart rate is slower in athletes, hypothyroidism, and when taking medications like a beta-blocker.

Pressure

Blood pressure. The top number is the systolic pressure, which is the force the blood pushes on the arteries as it squeezes through. Generally 120mmHg or less is considered healthy. The bottom number in your reading is the diastolic pressure. Diastolic pressure is the force the blood acts on the arteries when the heart is filling with blood. Around 80mmHg is a good number. A visit to your doctor will help you understand how often you should test and what your numbers mean if they are not around 120/80mmHg.

Electrical

Electrocardiogram or EKG measures the electrical impulse that causes the heart to pump blood.  Sometimes people get a pacemaker if the natural electrical system is not working properly.

Hormonal

The heart is hormonal. Two well known hormones are atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP).  ANF and BNP are activated by increased wall stretch due to increased volume and pressure overload – they rise sharply right after a heart attack and can be monitored as an indicator of cardiovascular disease.

Rhythm

Heart rate variability (HRV), or the beat to beat variation of the heart rhythms are the clearest indicator of one’s emotional states, level of stress and cognitive processes. It is also the most consistent measure of cardiovascular health.  The 1994 Framingham Heart Study identified increased Heart Rate Variability (HRV) as the only common factor that was found in all healthy individuals.

 

 

Want to learn more?

Free Seminar on the Science of the Heart

Wednesday February 22, 2017, 6:30-8pm

Goodness Me!

From the mind and heart of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

Dr. Phil Shares: 5 Tips To Avoid Muscle Soreness

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Beachbody-Blog-Muscle-Soreness

Nothing derails your fitness goals like feeling sore. Yet getting sore is almost unavoidable—it’s a rite of passage, if you will. But it doesn’t have to wipe you out. Follow these tips and, if you’re lucky, you’ll avoid the dreaded DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) monster altogether.

 

1. Start SLOW
It’s very tempting to begin an exercise program with a lot of enthusiasm, but try your best to go at a reasonable pace. If you’ve never exercised, or it’s been a long time since you have, go much easier than you feel you are capable of on Day 1 and ramp things up at a pace that is based on how you feel. If you’re not sore, go a little harder the next day. If you’re a little sore, take it down a notch. If you’re very sore, scroll down to the next section of this article to mitigate the soreness.

If you’ve been exercising, but it’s been more than a week since you last worked out, follow the same pattern but go harder, based—again—on how fit you are. A good example to use here would be to start with about half of the workout scheduled—something like the warm-up, cooldown, and one round of exercises. Because you have a better fitness base, you can advance a little bit further each day than if you were out of shape. In general, take about a week to get back to full-bore 100% effort. This is also the example you want to use if you’ve been training and taken some time off.

If you’ve been exercising, but are starting a new program, base how hard you push yourself on how much advancement there is in your program. For example, if you’ve been doing INSANITY and you’re moving into INSANITY: THE ASYLUM or P90X, you can probably give it 100%—though you might not want to lift too much weight. But if you’re coming into one of those from FOCUS T25, you’ll want to back off a bit from what you could achieve on those first few days. Whenever your program makes a big jump, in time, intensity, or style of training (from all cardio to weight training, for instance), you’ll always want to hold a bit back in the beginning.

The reason is that your body has two types of muscle fibers: fast and slow (there are actually increments of these but this is enough for our scope). Fast-twitch fibers are very strong but break down easily and take a long time to repair. This translates into soreness. By easing into a program, you rely on your slow-twitch fibers which aren’t as strong but recovery very quickly. Going full bore on Day 1 activates your fast-twitch fibers, and leads to extensive breakdown and soreness. The harder you go, the sorer you are likely to get because there is something called emergency fibers, the fastest of the fast, which can take two weeks to repair.

 

2. Minimize Eccentric Motion
Concentric contraction is the shortening of the muscle, while eccentric contraction is the lengthening part of the movement. DOMS is almost entirely related to the eccentric part of the movement. You might be asking yourself, can I do one without the other? Good question.

If you’re doing a biceps curl, the concentric part of the movement is when you move the weight up, while the eccentric part is the way down. In order to avoid the eccentric part, you need to drop your weight. This won’t make you very popular in a gym and might ruin your floor at home, so probably not a very helpful suggestion.

In other cases, avoiding eccentric motion can be impossible. Jumping, for instance, uses concentric force to get you elevated, at which point you need to land, which is eccentric. The only way to do concentric-only jumps is to jump onto a platform and then lightly step down. Again, not too practical.

You can, however, limit the amount of time you’re lengthening your muscles. Slowing down your concentric motions and returning to the start position very quickly, or eliminating the airborne portion of jump training, are good ways to mostly avoid eccentric motion with only slight modifications.

You may have noticed that a lot of very popular exercise programs actually target jumping and eccentric movements. That’s because training them is highly effective, just not until your body is in shape to handle it. Which it never will be unless you proceed slowly and carefully.

 

3. Hydrate
Dehydration can also make you sore. In fact, once you’re used to your workout program, nearly all excessive soreness is due to dehydration or nutritional deficiencies.

Most people are chronically dehydrated. In fact, you can actually get sore by simply being dehydrated, even without the exercise. Adding exercise increases your water needs. A lot. Hydration is your body’s first defense against, not only soreness, but also most illnesses and other maladies.

How much water you need varies depending on your activity level, lifestyle, where you live, etc., but an easy gauge to use is to drink half your body weight in ounces each day. That’s before you account for exercise. For each hour you work out, you should add another 32 ounces (on average). This, too, varies based on the individual, heat, humidity, exercise intensity, and so forth, but you probably get the idea. You need a lot of water for optimal performance.

Water isn’t the only factor in hydration. Electrolytes, or body salts, are also sweated out when you exercise and must be replaced. If you’re training an hour per day or less, you probably don’t need to worry about them unless your diet is very low in sodium.

It’s also possible to drink too much water, a condition called hyponatremia. While this is a deadly condition, it’s irrelevant for most of the population for most conditions. Hyponatremia is an imbalance of water and electrolytes. However, it’s very hard for normal humans to get hyponatremia in everyday circumstances because you have to drink a lot of water, have very little salt, and sweat profusely for a long time. So while it’s a very real danger for those doing Ironman triathlons or people stranded in deserts, it’s not a relevant concern for most of us. If you’ve been eating regularly, your foods contain some salt (most do), and you’re not exercising over an hour or two per day, it’s not something to worry about unless you’re drinking multiple gallons of water a day.

 

4. Get Postworkout Fuel
The hour after you finish exercising is your nutrition sweet spot. The quicker your muscles recover, the less sore you get, so you never want to skip your postworkout snack unless you’ve reached a point when you know you’re not going to get sore.

What this snack should consist of has been debated for ages but countless modern studies show that glycogen depletion (replenished quickest with simple carbohydrates), should be your primary concern. Glycogen is a fuel that your muscles store in limited amounts. When you run out of it during exercise, your workout goes south very quickly. When it’s gone, muscle damage increases until it’s been restored.

Protein, which repairs muscle tissue but is very slow to digest, replenishing body salts, and targeted micronutrients (aka vitamins), all come next.

Left out of this puzzle is fat, but not in all forms. Some studies show promise using medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) postexercise, though it’s probably too techie to bother with in this article because most consumable fat slows digestion of all nutrients, which should also be your first priority when excessive muscle tissue damage has been done.

What is debated, however, is what that ideal carb to protein ratio should be. It basically comes down to how depleted your glycogen stores are. The more depleted, the more important carbohydrates become in your replenishment strategy.

While you will learn to tell when your glycogen is gone (or low) through experience, keep this in mind for now: the body can store enough glycogen for about an hour of hard training. If your workouts are 30 minutes or less, you may not need any carbohydrates. Approach an hour and you probably need at least some.

It also matters what you’ve eaten during the day, prior to the workout. If you’re hungry at the start, it could be an indication that your glycogen is low. If you start low, you may run out quickly.

Glycogen depletion is characterized by feeling empty. If you hit a point in your workout where you feel like you can’t go on, or you’re performing worse than you had been, you’re likely out of glycogen. Known as bonking in sports circles, when this happens you’ll want to shut down a workout and fuel up ASAP.

When you’re out of glycogen, it’s most effectively replaced by a targeted recovery supplement, like Results and Recovery Formula. These are formulated using every nutrient your body can use for recovery. In lieu of that, almost anything carb heavy can be effective. Something like a small bowl of cereal, perhaps with a banana, is a decent substitute. Aim to consume between 100 and 250 calories, depending on your size and how difficult your workout was. More than that probably can’t be digested within an hour.

If your workout was short or didn’t seem to tax you too much, opting for a protein-based snack is a better choice. Whey protein, due to the quickness your body absorbs it, is the best option here, and it’s also where you might consider MCTs if you’re intrigued by them.

 

5. Pick the Correct Workout Program
It’s worth noting that the more you stretch yourself with your choice of workout, program, or even each individual workout, the more you increase your chances of getting sore. The right program—or a trainer/coach—should ease you into exercise at a pace your body can handle, which is always the better choice. But, you know, whatever works for your psyche is probably what you’re going to choose. And that’s okay. Just be honest with yourself, and follow the rules above if you know you’re biting off a little more than you can chew.

 

What Happens If You Do Get Sore?

No matter how diligent we are, we all seem to mess this up, somehow, sometimes. Depending upon how much you skewed it, you can be back at full strength within a few days. Occasionally—at least if you’re like me—you’ll go way beyond what you should have done. In such cases, you can be out up to a couple of weeks. Either way, these tips will help you get back on the fast track.

 

1. Move
The last thing you want to do, when everything hurts is to move. But that’s exactly what you need to do. While you won’t want to continue with your gung ho workouts, you’ll still want to exercise daily. How much you do depends upon how sore you are.

If you really overcooked it, and things like walking down stairs feel like a torture test (I’ve been there), you won’t want to do much beyond moving as much as you can. All movement promotes blood circulation, and the more blood you circulate around your body, the quicker you’ll heal.

If you have a more sensible soreness, you can do your workout at a modified pace or, better yet, choose a recovery workout. If you’re using a Beachbody program, it probably came with a recovery workout or two. These workouts are designed to help your body work out kinks and soreness better than doing nothing could ever hope to. They can be used anytime you need them, can’t be done too often, and always leave you feeling much better than before you started.

 

2. Use Circulation Techniques
You can also induce circulation with some other techniques, all of which will help. In extreme cases, physical therapists are loaded with various devices to aid recovery, but here are three you can do at home. While none of these will rid you of soreness alone, each one you can put into practice improves your chances of relief.

Ice and heat – Though ice slows circulation over time, it’s a fantastic circulation tool when used strategically. Your body is almost a hundred degrees. Rubbing ice on (or submerging for short periods of time) affected areas causes blood to rush from that area. Applying a little heat brings it back. It’s a bit like moving, without the movement.

Hot/cold showers – On the same theme, alternately turning your shower on hot, then cold, and pointing it at sore muscles causes a similar effect. The greater contrast between hot and cold you can stand, the greater the recovery effect.

Restoration poses – Also known as taking a load off, yoga restoration poses are a bit more targeted than just kicking it on the couch with your feet up, though some of the poses are very similar. These are movement-free poses designed to circulate blood in and out of targeted areas.

Nutrition – The better you eat, the better your body works, period. When you have excessive breakdown, which you do when you’re sore, every nutrient helps. It’s a common tendency to drown injuries (and soreness is a small injury) with alcohol and desserts. And while that may help your mental state, it will slow down your recovery.

 

What Not To Do If You’re Sore: Take NSAIDS (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)
In the “what doesn’t work” section, see vitamin I (street name for ibuprofen, naproxen, and aspirin). While they are a common tool for recovery and pain relief, especially for recreational athletes, studies have repeatedly shown that they don’t aid in muscle recovery and, in fact, may exacerbate muscle breakdown. Plus, they come with a slew of other side effects.

Therefore, they should be avoided as much as possible. Understandably, you may want to use them to mask the pain in the most acute stages. Just know that it’s masking, and not solving, the recovery process. There’s too much on this topic to go into here, so I’ve provided some studies (below) for the curious.

 

Resources:
Donnelly AE, Maughan RJ, Whiting PH. Effects of ibuprofen on exercise-induced muscle soreness and indices of muscle damage.

Gorsline RT1, Kaeding CC. The use of NSAIDs and nutritional supplements in athletes with osteoarthritis: prevalence, benefits, and consequences.Clin Sports Med. 2005 Jan;24(1):71-82.

Rahnama N, Rahmani-Nia F, Ebrahim K. The isolated and combined effects of selected physical activity and ibuprofen on delayed-onset muscle soreness. Journal of Sports Science. 2005 Aug; 23(8): 843-50.

Trelle S1, Reichenbach S, Wandel S, Hildebrand P, Tschannen B, Villiger PM, Egger M, Jüni P. Cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: network meta-analysis.BMJ. 2011 Jan 11;342:c7086. doi: 10.1136/bmj.c7086.

Warden SJ. Prophylactic use of NSAIDs by athletes: a risk/benefit assessment. Phys Sportsmed. 2010 Apr;38(1):132-8. doi: 10.3810/psm.2010.04.1770.

Wharam PC, Speedy DB, Noakes TD, Thompson JM, Reid SA, Holtzhausen LM. NSAID use increases the risk of developing hyponatremia during an Ironman triathlon. Medicine and Science Sports and Exercise. 2006 Apr; 38(4): 618-22

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph

Thanks for sharing Beachbody.com

Dr. Phil Shares: 7 Secrets to Sticking with Exercise

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7 Secrets of Sticking With Exercise

 

Staying fit is a super power, wellness-wise. Exercise can improve your energy levels, sleep quality, body composition, and overall health. While these perks are great, hectic lives can make sticking with an exercise program tricky. Simple shifts in your behaviors can help minimize these barriers, making reaching and maintaining your fitness goals almost as easy as pushing play.

Set reasonable goals. Start with activities that seem attainable and reasonably challenging, then set a goal to engage in that activity at least a few times per week. Most wellness perks, according to the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, kick in if you do a minimum of 150 minutes of moderately-intense exercise per week. That’s just over 21 minutes a day.

Schedule it. Prioritize workouts in your calendar like anything else. Schedule routine sessions at times that make the most sense within your lifestyle. Many people find it’s easier to stick to an exercise routine in the morning while others find they have more energy in the afternoons. But neither is ideal if the time isn’t convenient for you. Experiment with various options until you find one that works.

Get the gear. Ideally, your workouts won’t require a lot of equipment. Regardless, stock up on whatever you need to get started and choose quality gear, especially when it comes to particularly important items, such as athletic shoes. Wearing colors and textures you enjoy may also help keep you motivated to suit up and head out.

Plan ahead. Prepare your gear ahead of time to prevent skipping workouts. If you schedule your workouts for the morning, set your fitness attire out the night before. If you plan to exercise on your way home from work, pack a workout bag in advance and bring it with you.

Buddy up. Most everything is more fun with friends. Use the buddy system for increased workout accountability and enjoyment. If showing up or making time to exercise is your biggest challenge, having someone to be accountable to could be all you need.

Sleep and rest well. Quality sleep makes for effective exercise, and helps ensure that you have the mental gusto to show up. Cultivate a healthy sleep schedule, and stick to routine sleep and waking times as often as you can.

Cut yourself some slack. Aiming for perfection can work against you. If you miss a workout, don’t beat yourself up. Instead, consider it a rest day and get back on it the next day. If you find yourself unable to stick to your goals, reassess. It’s better to work out at a lower intensity or for less time for a while than not at all. If you’re still struggling, seek guidance from a qualified sports trainer or one of the Beachbody experts. Doing so doesn’t show weakness, but strength.

By August McLaughlin @ Beachbody.com

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health in Guelph

Dr. Phil Shares: Make These 15 Small Changes to See Big Results

 

turkey sandwich

Whether you’re just getting started or just want to lose those last 10 pounds, scroll through these little changes that can have a big impact!

  • Swap Mayo for Avocado
    Making a sandwich? Avocado > butter or mayo. It’s full of healthy monounsaturated fat and fiber and contains more nutrients than those other two.
  • Refined Carbs
    Replace refined carbs (like white rice or enriched pasta) with whole grain versions. Whole grains have more fiber and more nutrients and absorb slower. The result is they won’t spike your blood sugar and will provide you with longer-lasting energy.
  • Rotate Playlist
    Rotate your playlist to keep your workout feeling fresh. And, while we love our trainers, if you need an extra push, don’t hesitate to put on your own soundtrack.
  • Swap Soda for Tea
    Swap soda with unsweetened, preferably fresh-brewed, iced tea. You’ll save hundreds of calories and won’t be drinking nasty chemicals. Just make sure not to drink “diet” tea or tea with weird preservatives or other chemicals.
  • television
    Watching TV? Do push-ups, crunches, squats, or stretch during commercials. You’ll burn extra calories, keep your brain active, and spend less time sitting (which is really bad for you in long stretches).
  • Reward Yourself
    Reward yourself with clothing or new fitness gear when you hit a milestone to give yourself something to look forward to and to train your brain to stop rewarding your body with food.
  • Divide Your Plate
    Dedicate 75% of your plate to vegetables and the remainder to whole grains and lean proteins. It will help you feel more full and will provide your body with necessary vitamins and minerals
  • Pedometer
    Wear a pedometer. You likely spend a lot of the day sitting. Blast belly fat by moving 10,000 steps per day, or approximately five miles
  • Olive Oil
    Cooking? Use light olive oil instead of butter. Why not extra virgin? When cooking over high heat, extra virgin’s lower smoke point can cause it to break down into dangerous byproducts.
  • Sign up for a competition
    Sign up for an athletic competition to keep yourself motivated. If your goal is “getting in shape,” it’s easy to lose steam! But, if you know you have to get—or stay—fit for an upcoming race, you’re more likely to stick with your workouts.
  • Ketchup
    Reach for mustard, hot sauce, and salsa instead of ketchup, mayo, or sour cream. Why? The former have fewer calories, more nutrients, and usually less sugar.
  • Plan Activity date
    Plan a fun activity date, like a snowball fight, a hike, or a game of tennis. Why? Novel activities and laughter are two proven ways to strengthen the bond between you and your partner.
  • Eat Slowly
    Eat slowly. It takes your body 20 minutes to realize it’s full. By eating slower, you’re less likely to overeat.
  • Sleep
    Get some Zs! Getting 7 to 8 hours of sleep helps muscles recover faster, the brain work better, and makes you less likely to overeat.
  • Take the Stairs
    Take the stairs! Park farther from the entrance! The less time you spend sitting, the better it is for your body. And, if you’re trying to lose weight, every little bit counts!
  • Thanks for sharing Beachbody.com

 

Gluten: More danger than we thought

Gluten is more than a digestive disrupter

A review of research from the past 50 years revels a link of gluten to chronic disease. It is now accepted that gluten sensitivity can affect body wide functions.

Intake of gluten may impact body function and lead to chronic diseases.

Gluten may:

  • impair nutrient absorption
    • lead to a cascade of neurological, bone, brain, and thyroid problems
  • increase inflammation in the brain
    • contribute to brain fog, dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s
  • impair blood glucose control
    • aggravate mood, appetite, diabetes
  • stop your feeling of being full
    • lead to eating more than you need, weight gain
  • stimulate an immune attack on
    • fibrous sheath on the muscle
    • myelin sheath of the nerves
    • & much, much more

Not even a tummy ache

Most patients who present with neurological or other organ manifestations of gluten sensitivity have no gastrointestinal symptoms.

Gluten could affect you or someone you love.

Empower your health with Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

Complimentary education talk at Goodness Me!

Wednesday January 18th 6:30-8pm.

Dr. Phil Shares: 9 Tips For Fitness Success in 2017

Follow These 9 Tips to See Success on Your Fitness Journey

It’s January! Time to dust off those sneakers and dive in to that fitness routine so you can ditch those holiday pounds and get down to your goal weight.

Whether you’re following a routine for the first time (or for the first time in a long time) or just refocusing your efforts in the New Year, here are some of my favorite tips on what to keep in mind as you get started. These tips will help you stick with it when you’re feeling grumpy or tired or frustrated or hungry.

Do: Before you start, log your weight, your measurements, and take your photos.
Don’t: Freak out over what you see.
No one likes his or her Day 1 photos or measurements. But, by capturing all of the basic information (how much you weigh, how big your waist is, what you look like shirtless or in a bikini), you’ll establish a starting place. Then, when you take down all this information again (we usually recommend taking them every 30 days, unless you’re doing the 21 Day Fix), you’ll see how much you’ve changed. “I can’t tell you how many times one of our Success Stories has told me that their ‘before’ picture on the fridge saved them at some point along the way,” says Steve Edwards, Beachbody’s VP of Fitness & Nutrition.

Do: Weigh yourself once a week
Don’t: Weigh yourself every day
Full disclosure – I break this rule. I weigh myself every morning just after I wake up. I don’t recommend it, but helps me stay on track. Your weight can fluctuate every day based on how much sodium you consumed the day before, how much you sweated during your workout, whether you went to the bathroom, what time of the month it is, etc. If you’re the type who could get discouraged from seeing your weight go up a pound or two (or more) in 24 hours, then I recommend weighing in approximately the same time each week. It’ll give you a better overall sense of the trend your weight is heading in. Just keep in mind you might gain a few pounds during the first few weeks of beginning a program. We explain why – and when you should see the numbers drop – here.

Do: Eat for the body you want – not the one you have
Don’t: Cut out all of your favorite foods
If you really want to be miserable and set yourself up for failure, cut out everything you like to eat. If your diet is really bad, a lot of stuff you like might have to go. Soda, fried food, super sugary coffee drinks…Think of this new journey as a boot camp. You’re training for the body you’ve always wanted. So feed that body with the food it needs. Lean proteins, complex carbs, and lots of nutrient-packed vegetables. We have tons of healthy recipes on this blog that will fit your new lifestyle. We even have healthier version of some of your favorite foods, including pizza, fries, and burgers. Think about your diet as an 80/20 split. 80% of the time, eat “clean.” The other 20% of the time, don’t stress about it. If you really want that beer or that cookie, have it. One cookie or one beer, isn’t going to be your downfall. Here’s an easy-to-follow article on how to change your diet over 8 weeks, cheat meals included.

Do: Plan your meals and organize your kitchen
Don’t: Wait until the day of to figure it out.
By planning your meals, like one of our social media ambassadors, Amanda Meixner (@meowmeix) does every week, you make it easier to eat healthier because you don’t have to think about it every day. You just grab your breakfast and/or your lunch and go. We’re going to start posting her meal plan photos each Monday to keep you inspired.

Do: Push through the soreness
Don’t: Push yourself to the point of injury
Whenever I start a new fitness program, I assume I’m going to be sore for the first two weeks. Even if the soreness doesn’t last that long, it helps my mind get in the right zone. “Soreness is a right of passage, but it’s still difficult to deal with,” says Edwards. “Don’t go 100% on day one, and ramp things up each day based on how you feel. If you do get sore, back off but don’t stop. Doing a workout at 50% is a lot better than nothing. It will also help your soreness fade quicker.” Here are some great tips on how to avoid soreness.

Do: Expect to be a little hungry and maybe a little grumpy in the beginning.
Don’t: Fall back into old bad habits.
No matter what change you’re making – whether it’s a new fitness routine or a cross-country move – there are bound to be growing pains. Change is uncomfortable. Prepare to feel a little out of sorts – you might be hungry, you might feel sore, you might be a little grumpy in response – and it’s more likely you’ll have an easier transition into your new lifestyle. “Soreness and hunger go hand in hand”, says Edwards. “When you’re sore you’re broken down and that incites hunger to repair your body. They’ll subside together. To speed things up, consider targeted nutrition or supplementation. The right food and the right time will minimize your desire to over eat.”

Do: Follow your workout calendar
Don’t: Don’t wait until Monday to start again if you miss a workout.
If you missed a workout because of sickness or travel or you just didn’t feel like doing it, don’t worry. Just get back to it. Not sure where to pick back up? This article will tell you.

Do: Get back on program if you fall off.
Don’t: Don’t beat yourself up, feel like you’ve failed, or wait until the next day/week/month to start over.
No one is perfect. Not me, not you, and not our trainers. Everyone has an unhealthy meal sometimes or misses a workout. Don’t let that define your day, your week, or your month. Justget right back on track. You’re on a journey and along the way, there are going to be a few misses. If you pick yourself right back up and keep going, you’ll get there.

Do: Share what you’re doing and find people who will keep you accountable
Don’t: Listen to the haters.
If you share what you’re doing with those around you, there’s a greater likelihood you’ll succeed because you’re creating a social support system that you’re accountable to. There might be people who pooh-pooh your journey, but ignore them. They have their reasons for doing so (usually the reasons stem from jealousy or fear), so just stay positive and reach out to your support system when you need help. We’re here for you, so don’t hesitate to reach out!

Here’s where to get even more support during your journey.
• If you have questions for our fitness and nutrition experts, post them here in the expert forums, and they’ll answer them.
• If you need more peer support, Beachbody’s social channels on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and the Team Beachbody message boards are great places to start.
• If you have a general question you’d like to see answered in our blog, email us at mailbag@beachbody.com.
•If you need a little extra motivation that day, tag me in your photo on Instagram (I’m @r_swanner).

Good luck and I can’t wait to see your after photos!

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health

Thanks for sharing Beachbody.com