Post Workout Massage–What You Should Do After Your Next Workout

We have all been there…..we went to the gym and did an endurance cycling class or went for a run and ran the hardest that we ever have and all that we can think about is how sore we are going to be the next day.  This muscle soreness is often what deters people from continuing their intense workout routines because they don’t want to be sore the next day.  But this does not have to be the case.  Having a massage after any  workout can ease post workout muscle soreness.  Did you know that even a ten minute massage after a training session or workout can improve your rebound time or post work out recovery? Check out this excellent article in Men’s Fitness  to see what the research says.

After a period of hard training or exercise  there will be an accumulation of waste material and possibly some micro trauma with slight swelling in the muscles. The tissues will also be nutritionally depleted and some may be in need of repair. By stimulating the blood circulation through the strained muscles with massage therapy, all these situations can be helped.  The waste is removed more quickly and completely and more fresh blood from the arteries arrives to supply the repair and nutritional needs. There should always be a rest period after exercise to allow the recovery process to take place, and a massage greatly improves the quality and effectiveness of such rest. It is the quality of rest that is the key to effective training and regular massage therapy treatments that enables more endurance workouts  at a higher level and with less injury.

By having a massage after your workout the conversation no longer has to be on how sore you are going to be, rather on how good you feel and how much quicker our muscles recovered so that you could duplicate the same workout the next day at the same intensity with no kick back pain.

So the next time your are running in the Forward Health neighbourhood at Preservation Park  or at your next cycling class at Movati fitness in Guelph,  why not consider working a massage therapy treatment into your workout routine?  Kick up the intensity in your workout without the worry of being sore for days later. After all , your massage therapy at Forward Health will take care of that.The-Function-of-a-Running-Shoe-18356134

Tour de Guelph – Sunday June 26, 2016

covered bridge ian and others_zpsjmadoa7x

Hi Everyone, Dr. Phil here, and I personally want to wish you a Happy and Safe Summer Season ahead.

One of my favorite things to do during the Summer is ride my bicycle, and participate in fundraising endeavors involving riding. One which is close to my heart and in our community is The 3rd Annual Tour de Guelph.  Those of you who know me, also know that my motto is “Motion Is Lotion” in order to stay pain free and full of energy, so a great way to achieve this goal is to get on your bicycle, and come on out on June 26th, with the start and finish at The University of Guelph.  I’ve outlined some information below to help you get signed up.

Looking forward to sharing in a great experience this year, and supporting our community-it’s as easy as riding a bike.

From the website:

The third annual Tour de Guelph will take place on Sunday, June 26, 2016. The committee is already hard at work planning an even better event for you, building on the success of our first two events.

Last year, we had close to 600 riders and raised $40,000 for Guelph General Hospital and Rotary projects. We look forward to improving on both those numbers. Thanks to all who participated – our riders, volunteers, sponsors, donors, organizing committee and other participants. Together, we showed that supporting our community is as easy as riding a bike. Here’s a collection of photos from the day. To open the photos page in the a new browser click here.

Here’s a collection of photos from last year’s event. To open the photos page in the a new browser click here. – See more at: http://tourdeguelph.kintera.org/faf/home/default.asp?ievent=1153667&lis=0&kntae1153667=949264558AB34B7797484882686692F7#sthash.nmn09CNS.dpuf

Dr. Phil’s Page: http://tourdeguelph.kintera.org/20160515120828786

Q: Where can I get additional information? Questions on registration can be sent to our Registrar at registration@tourdeguelph.ca. Questions on volunteering can be sent to our Volunteer Coordinator at volunteer@tourdeguelph.ca. Questions on any other matters can be sent to info@tourdeguelph.ca.2015-07-05 11.47.13

Psoriasis and other Autoimmune Conditions

Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disorder typically identified by reddened dry skin that becomes progressively flaky and scaly as well as painful and itchy. Usually the plaques are found on extensor surfaces such as elbows, knees and scalp.

psoriasis medscape

The immune system is involved in this inflammatory condition. Quite often once one autoimmune disease is had, others will evolve as well. Autoimmune means that the body’s defense system is attacking the body it lives in. It is hypervigilant. There is likely some genetic susceptibility in the individual, followed by an incident where the immune system launched a defense against a foreign molecule that had some resemblance to the molecules of the body. Now, when the immune system sees that near match it sends out its troupes and ends up destroying the tissues of its own body.

Autoimmune diseases can affect the heart, brain, nerves, muscles, skin, eyes, joints, lungs, kidneys, glands, the digestive tract, and blood vessels. Among others, it is the underlying mechanism of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Celiac, Crohn’s, Sjogren’s, Type I Diabetes and Psoriasis.

On Wednesday, July 27 at 6:30 in the Goodness Me! classroom at the corner of Gordon and Wellington St. in Guelph, join Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND to learn some of the underlying mechanisms of autoimmune diseases and the natural approaches for treatment. In this session, Dr. Laura M. Brown ND, will share her experience with research in Iceland’s geothermal psoriasis treatment centre and will address natural treatments options for those suffering with autoimmune diseases.

Register here.

picture from Medscape.com

Recipe for BBQ Lamb & Meal Plan

Lamb finished

New Zealand Spring Lamb

Follow this meal plan and Father’s Day dinner will be simple to prepare for and easy to please Dad on his special day.

Chops are easy to manage and quite tasty. I buy mine at Costco on Imperial Road in Guelph. One tray has about 8 chops.  Of course if you are an Ontario Lamb fan, that’s always fantastic to support local farmers.  Marinade 12-24 hours ahead of cooking and if you don’t need all 8, freeze the remaining marinaded chops for a future date. They easily defrost within 12 hours in the fridge, so take them out in the morning and they’ll be ready for BBQ that night.

Marinade

Olive oil – about 1/4 cup

Fresh Sliced Garlic – 1 bud

Rosemary – about 1 Tbsp

Ground black pepper corns – about 1 Tbsp

Lamb1

Usually I find a glass Pyrex rectangular container or something similar works best for this. One with a plastic seal able lid so the whole fridge doesn’t smell like garlic while it is marinading. Use about 1/4 c of olive oil, pour this in the glass container, then add about 1 tbsp of dried rosemary, slice up one bud of garlic thinly or in chopped finely. Course ground black pepper or grind peppercorns fresh with mortar and pestle – about 1 Tbsp. Rinse lamb chops off in cold running water, drip dry for a moment, then transfer to container with oil and herbs. Roll the chops around in the marinade so each is well coated. Arrange in the pan – a tight fit is good as it keeps the air out. Allow to marinade in fridge for 12-24hours.

BBQ Time

Lamb3Heat the grill with all burners on high. Allow to come to 500 degrees Fahrenheit or hotter. We have three burners on our BBQ, which is average sized. After all is hot, turn the one burner at the far end where you will place the meat on low, the middle burner with nothing on it at medium and the burner furthest from the meat, leave on high. This will give lots of heat to the cooking (mine went up to 700degrees Fahrenheit) and will minimize flares. Note to the chef… charring meat to a crisp is not healthy! Close the lid. Cook on one side for 6 min. Then turn meat over. Cook on other side for additional 6 min. When lamb comes off the BBQ it will continue to cook for a minute or two. Once it reaches the plate it will be pink in the middle but cooked.

Side Dishes

BBQ Lamb goes great with whipped sweet potatoes. Peel, chop and boil in a little water. Drain water once potatoes are soft. (Hint: I save the water the sweet potato boiled in a mason jar and will add to soups or use as a stir fry base later in the week.) Back to the day: Add 1 Tbsp of coconut oil to the cooked sweet potatoes and use a hand mixer on medium or high for 2-3 minutes until all the lumps are out.

Lamb isn’t the same without mint sauce or jelly. Mint is growing fresh you might take task to do this at home. Everyone in our home likes the Presidents Choice Mint Sauce and Mint Jelly you can find in the condiments section at Zehrs. Even the smaller Zehrs at Gordon and Clair area in Guelph carries this.

Veggies: hmm… any will do & lots. Steamed organic broccoli or peas and mushrooms or grilled or steamed asparagus is always a great companion. Of course always a big side serving of healthy leafy salad greens with a balsamic and olive oil vinaigrette.

New thing we found follows the meal very well  is sliced mango. Peel the mango and slice onto a plate – it’s great to taste near the end of the meal.

Vino – a glass a day is OK

I would pair this lamb meal with a glass of Valpolicella Ripasso, Amorone or Chianti Classico.

 From the heart and kitchen of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND.

Prevent and Treat Summer Sports Injuries with These Tips

Summer is the season when many competitive athletes and weekend warriors’ are most physically active. Hospitals get busier as well, seeing an increase in sports-related injuries. Many of these painful problems can be avoided with some basic pre- and post-workout practices that keep athletes ready to play and help them recover after.

“During the summer months we see an influx of patients with injuries associated with increased activity level; too much, too soon, too fast,” says Dr. Phil. “We also see an increase in injuries associated with environmental illnesses like heat illness and dehydration”.

Repetitive Stress Injuries

A traumatic injury occurs at one time, such as when someone sprains an ankle, tears a muscle, injures a knee or breaks a bone. A repetitive-stress injury occurs when an athlete repeats a movement, such as a baseball pitch or a tennis backhand. Over time, a muscle or ligament or tendon begins to wear down.

Athletes should pay attention to nagging soreness in joints and be careful about pain relievers that can hide a serious problem. A visit to a qualified sports medicine physician can help pinpoint an overuse issue that’s causing pain. Treatment often includes adding strength-training exercises that target the specific area. Athletes can then meet with his or her coach and work on improving the throw or swing that’s causing the problem.

The Stretching Myth

Athletes might be surprised to learn that stretching a muscle and holding that stretch before activity not only doesn’t reduce the risk of injury, it actually impairs sports performance and can increase a person’s risk for an injury. Holding a stretch, known as static stretching, desensitizes muscles and decreases vertical leap and power for approximately 15 minutes. It’s OK to do this type of stretching roughly 30 minutes before activity or immediately following, but not right before a jog or volleyball match.  Examples of dynamic stretches are: skipping, jumping jacks, quick lunges, arm circles and light jogging. After every workout, practice, game or match, athletes should static stretch to increase flexibility and improve future performance.

Static stretching is helpful after a workout or game. “Cooling down and stretching after activity shows benefits for injury prevention, particularly after consecutive intense workout days in a row,” says Dr. Phil.

RICE Might not be Nice

For decades, athletes have used ice to immediately treat sprains and other injuries. The most common method of treating sports injuries today is the RICE method (rest, ice, compression, elevation). According to current sport researchers (including Dr. Gabe Mirkin, who coined “RICE” and that treatment in 1978), icing is actually the wrong way to go. Inflammation after an injury is a sign the body is working to heal the problem. When athletes ice an injury, they slow the healing process. The same happens when taking anti-inflammatory medications, such as cortisone shots or ibuprofen.

It’s OK to use ice to manage severe pain, but only for 10 minutes, followed by a 20-minute break, followed by another 10 minutes of ice and so on. Athletes should stop icing after six hours and visit a doctor if the pain persists. If pain lasts for more 48 hours, it might be a sign professional medical attention is needed.

Hydrate Properly

During the summer, people participating in hard physical activity should begin all exercise sessions well hydrated, recommends Dr. Smith. “If a person becomes thirsty during activity, he is at least one liter depleted of fluid and this is means he needs to hydrate.” An athlete should pre-hydrate with 17 to 20 ounces of fluid, two to three hours before exercise, and another 7 to 10 ounces of fluid 20 to 30 minutes before exercise, says Dr. Smith. If the activity last less than 45 minutes, water should be adequate for hydration. If the exercise lasts longer than 45 minutes, athletes should consume some post-exercise carbohydrates, either in a sports drink, energy bar, snack or meal.

Beware of Heat Exposure

Many people who get heat prostration don’t realize it and keep playing, eventually ending up in the hospital. On hot days, athletes should check themselves, their partners and teammates for signs of heat stress, such as bright red skin, a lack of sweating and cold, clammy skin. Wear light-colored clothes and hats that wick water away from skin (avoid cotton) and let skin breathe.

Safe Workout and Exercise Tips

Dr. Phil recommends the following tips to build a safe, enjoyable exercise program:

  1. Build Frequency – How often you perform an activity. Start 2-3 times a week and build from there.
  2. Increase Duration – How long you do an activity. Start with 20 minutes and build from there.
  3. Increase Intensity – How difficult your activity is. The recommended rate to increase the intensity of your program is no more than 10% per week.

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health

Too Easy Recipe for Collard Green Wraps

Collard Green Wraps

collardgreenGluten free, dairy free, egg free, soy free.

Great for lunches & picnics!

Remove the spine of the collard green leaf from the end and then wash, while still wet, put on a plate and warm up in microwave for 30 -40 seconds (longer if you put your goodies on it and want them warm too). If you have smaller leafs, place end for end to help make more space for the goodies you want to put inside.

You can put lentils, beans, rice, quinoa, grated carrots, grated ginger, sprouts, slivered celery or cucumbers, ground nuts and seeds, chicken, hamburger, chicken burger, left over stew or chili… you get the idea – pack it with anything – including scrambled eggs, but of course then it wouldn’t be egg free.

Some of my favourite combos include:

Rowe’s ground chicken (dark meat) BBQ burger with an avocado slice, sprouts and honey mustard

Quinoa, ground almonds, chopped figs, dash of apple cider vinegar and olive oil, grated ginger

Grated carrots & ginger with chicken breast slices, arugula and a mix (put in small jar and shake) of balsamic vinegar, olive oil and dijon mustard

eggs whites and shredded unsweetened coconut

roast beef leftovers with honey mustard horseradish and baby greens/spring mix

From the heart and kitchen of Dr. Laura M. Brown, ND

(picture from honestfare.com)

Increase Focus & Attention

With such a frenzied state of work, school, and family life, I have met many patients for whom reducing stress and anxiety is a priority. In reducing the stress and subsequent feelings of anxiety patients find they enjoy an increase focus and attention. What a bonus!

Along with a body wide acupuncture protocol, dietary changes to soothe the liver, I have found cerebral acupuncture to amp up the therapeutic value. This makes sense as the lines I treat on the head are over the temporal lobe which is linked to language, organization of sensory input and is highly associated with memory skills.

templobe11
  • Temporal lobe is linked to organization of sensory input and is highly associated with memory skills
  • Acupuncture helps lower state of anxiety, increase focus & attention
  • Needling specific points with mild electrostim increases therapeutic value
  • Within the first 1-3 treatments patients are feeling a difference that lasts about 5 days.
  • Many prefer to maintain weekly sessions during stressful periods of work, home or school.

 

Most patients say they notice some change after the first treatment, but it feels much more enhanced after the third session. Weekly acupuncture sessions lasting 30min each are highly recommended during periods of stress. After 6 weeks of treatment, most are feeling highly refreshed and are ready to see how they feel with a monthly maintenance appointment.

Cerebral acupuncture is just one of many ways Dr. Laura M.Brown ND, can help you increase your focus and attention. Individualized treatment plans are medically assessed and naturally focused. Click here to book your appointment with our online booking system.

 

De-stress Mom with a Massage

Massage for Mom

Of all the ways we can say thank you to Mom, perhaps the best choice involves stress relief. A relaxation massage can be the most de-stressing hour you can give Mom this year and Forward Health has gift certificates you can buy for the Mom in your life.

Stress is universal, and it’s not always bad. Whenever you jump to catch a badly thrown ball, feel especially energetic before an important meeting, or hit the brakes in time to avoid a car accident, stress is doing its job. The adrenaline boosting your heart rate and the cortisol boosting your blood sugar, while diverting energy away from your digestive system and immune responses, are exactly what prehistoric humans needed to fight or flee attackers.

However, when there’s never any relief from stress, the sustained fight-or-flight response can cause problems. In fact, WebMD warns that constant stress actually becomes “distress – a negative stress reaction. Distress can lead to physical symptoms including headaches, upset stomach, elevated blood pressure, chest pain, and problems sleeping. Research suggests that stress also can bring on or worsen certain symptoms or diseases.”

Virtually every symptom listed by the American Psychological Association can benefit from massage. Research has shown that it can lower your heart rate and blood pressure, relax your muscles and increase the production of endorphins, your body’s natural “feel good” chemical. Serotonin and dopamine are also released through massage, and the result is a feeling of calm relaxation that makes chronic or habitual as well as acute or short-term stress much easier to overcome.

In fact, stress relief is one of the first benefits that come to mind when thinking of massage therapy. It’s also a key component for anyone trying to achieve a healthier lifestyle. Clinical studies show that even a single 1-hour session can significantly lower your heart rate, cortisol levels and insulin levels – all of which explain why massage therapy and stress relief go hand-in-hand.

Benefits of Massage Therapy for Stress:

Taking care of their body should be at the top of everyone’s priorities. By adding therapeutic massage to their routine now, they’ll feel, look and simply be healthier far into the future. In fact, stress relief alone can improve anyone’s vitality and state of mind. So what better way to prep for a long, happy life than a relaxing, therapeutic massage?

In addition to stress relief, ongoing massage therapy can reduce pain, increase energy levels and improve overall physical and mental performance. Our experienced, professional therapists at Forward Health customize every massage (and stress relief) session to address individual needs.

Give the gift of Massage at Forward Health. Contact us at (519) 826-7973 or online at www.forwardhealth.ca or, drop by and pick one up today.

Dr. Phil Shares: The Function of a Running Shoe


May is Foot Care month, and a great way to take off on the right foot is to understand the function of our shoe, especially the Running Shoe. so here it is.

The function of a running shoe is to protect the foot from the stress of running, while permitting you to achieve your maximum potential. Selecting the right shoe for your foot can be confusing without the proper knowledge.

People with low arches, called pronators, will need a shoe that provides stability. A shoe with good cushioning is important for people with high arches, called supinators.

There are three main features that you need to consider when selecting a running shoe: shape, construction, and midsole.

Shape

To determine the shape of the shoe, look at the sole. Draw a straight line from the middle of the heel to the top of the shoe. In a curve-shaped shoe, most comfortable for supinators, the line will pass through the outer half of the toes. A straight-shaped shoe will have a line that passes through the middle of the toes. These shoes are built to give pronators added stability.

Construction

Take out the insole and look at what type of stitching is used on the bottom. In board construction shoes, built specifically for pronators, the bottom of the shoe will not have any visible stitching. Combination shoes, appropriate for mild pronators or supinators, will have stitching that begins halfway. On slip-constructed shoes, you will see stitching running the entire length of the shoe providing the flexibility supinators need.

Midsole

Most of the cushioning and stability of a running shoe is determined by the midsole. A dual-density midsole provides shock absorption as well as some stability, perfect for pronators. Single density midsoles offer good cushioning but are not great at providing stability, making them better for supinators.

Keep in mind that a chiropractor can help you prevent running-related problems by assessing your gait, as well as the mobility of the joints in your feet, legs, pelvis and spine.

Thanks to The OCA for sharing

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health in Guelph

Dr. Phil Shares: Kick Up Your Heels!

Not only can those brand new high-heeled shoes cause pain in your feet, they can cause low back pain as well. In fact, poor footwear can cause difficulties in the feet, knees, hips, low back and all the way up the spine. Generally, the best shoes for your body are relatively flat and provide adequate support.

Try these tips to reduce the pain on those high-heels days.

Shopping for shoes

Shop in the afternoon or evening, as your feet tend to accumulate fluid and swell throughout the day.

Choosing a shoe

  1. Choose a heel height that you can walk in gracefully. The effect of a high heel is easily negated by a clumsy walk.
  2. Try to choose a shoe with a heel height of no more than 2 inches. It’s a good compromise height that will still create the arched posture associated with high heels without sending you tipping out of them.
  3. Avoid buying shoes with a recessed heel, as it is one of the most unstable heel styles.
  4. Avoid shoes with many thin straps; these can dig into your skin causing pain and swelling.
  5. Ensure that the shoes have good support for the arches of your feet.

Give your feet a fighting chance

  1. Place a cushioning pad into the front of the shoe to pad the balls of your feet. This will also help keep your toes from getting wedged into the front of the shoe.
  2. Take a break from your heels now and then. Slip off your shoes discretely and stretch some of the tensed muscles. Wiggle your toes and make circles with your ankles to help increase circulation.
  3. Finally, after a long day or evening on your feet, give them a break. Wear a low, comfortable shoe the next day to rest your muscles. Soak your feet in warm water or give them a nice massage.

Thanks To the OCA for Sharing

Shared by Dr. Phil McAllister @ Forward Health Guelph